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Become An Aircraft Electrician

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Working As An Aircraft Electrician

  • Documenting/Recording Information
  • Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge
  • Getting Information
  • Repairing and Maintaining Electronic Equipment
  • Making Decisions and Solving Problems
  • Stressful

  • $58,540

    Average Salary

What Does An Aircraft Electrician Do At Headquarters, Air Force Reserve Command

* Troubleshoot electrical or environmental and related equipment for assigned aircraft.
* Install, modify, repair, replace, adjust and overhaul complex and/or electrical or environmental systems, components, and accessories, with intricate wiring armament, landing gear, antiskid, ignition, stall warning, power distribution, engine drive alternator and fuel indicating systems.
* Utilize safety practices and procedures and comply with security regulations, directives, and policies.
* Ensure tools are properly marked, calibrated (if necessary), and are secured when area is unattended.
* Certify work produced under the USAF Technical Order Program

What Does An Aircraft Electrician Do At Air National Guard Units (Title 32/Title 5)

* Performs functional tests, analyzes performance and troubleshoots the electronic, electrical, hydraulic, pneumatic and mechanical functions of the subsystems integrated into the digital brake/antiskid system, maintenance annunciation panel (MAP) system of the integrated main generator, standby generator, emergency generator, flight control power, AC/DC power distribution and sub-systems integrated into the electronic/electrical and environmental systems.
* Interprets analog and digital operational and output characteristics and results from the Maintenance Annunciation Panel (M
* A.P.), onboard computers, aircrew debriefings and specialized test equipment.
* The electrical system includes the electrical power generation and distribution system, the fire detection and extinguishing system, the ice and rain protection system, the landing gear system, the interior and exterior lighting system, the oxygen generation and distribution system, and the auxiliary power system.
* The environmental system includes compression, distribution, pressurization, heating, cooling, temperature control, moisture/air contamination control, and liquid cooling requirements.
* Removes, repairs, calibrates, installs, aligns, inspects, and conducts operational performance checkouts on the components of the electronic/electrical and environmental systems.
* Analyzes malfunctions using schematics, logic and wiring diagrams, computer data, and factory drawings.
* Diagnoses circuit operating characteristics using on-board computer, special test equipment and laptop computers to isolates problems to the failing component.
* Removes and replaces components or assemblies down to the lowest level authorized by depot.
* Performs organizational and intermediate level maintenance modifications as required.
* Performs recurring inspections and system tests of the life support and the electronic/electrical and environmental system to certify aircraft are ready for flight.
* Modifies and updates electrical and environmental support equipment according to applicable technical publications.
* Maintains and operates various types of test equipment such as oscilloscopes, diagnostic computers, digital and analog multi-meters, constant speed drive test stands, voltmeters, ammeters, etc.
* Performs precise and advanced wiring maintenance procedures on aircraft.
* Utilizes computer data and specialized test equipment to interpret equipment analog/digital operational characteristics to isolate malfunctions in the appropriate sub-systems.
* Interprets electronic terms and symbols, and applies a variety of electronic formulas, tables and charts in order to perform fault isolation and repairs to systems and sub-systems, such as the 1553 data bus's, BUS Interface Unit (BIU), BUS Adapter Unit (BAU), F
* Electrical Multiplexing System (EMUX), the C130J Enhanced Cargo Handling/Arial Delivery System (ECHS/ADS) and the F
* Engine Modification from the PW100
* to the PW100
* which incorporates a Digital Electronic Engine Control (DEEC).
* Provides technical guidance, advice and/or assistance to other work centers on the interrelationship of electronic/electrical and environmental systems and their respective system, to include flight controls, offensive fire control radar, weapon release, communications, hydraulic, fuel, engine and egress.
* Processes and accounts for supply assets in the repairable processing system to maintain aircraft records, inspection records, and equipment maintenance in computer systems (CAMS).
* Documents maintenance actions and man-hour expenditures on maintenance forms and computer systems.
* Clears Red X symbols on maintenance forms as authorized, and performs electronic/electrical and environmental system debriefing of aircrews.
* Recommends methods (AFTO Form 22) to improve equipment performance and maintenance procedures, i.e., data corrections to correct software or technical order deficiencies.
* Processes and accounts for due-in-from maintenance (DIFM) supply assets.
* Documents maintenance repair actions, man-hour accounting, maintenance forms, and computer systems.
* Maintains historical data of repaired components, Line Replaceable Units (LRUs) and test equipment.
* Performs other duties as assigned.
* PLEASE CONTACT HRO FOR COMPLETE JOB DESCRIPTION.
* Travel Required
* Not required
* Supervisory status
* No
* Promotion Potential
* Who May Apply
* This job is open to…
* United States Citizens
* Questions? This job is open to 1 group.
* Job family (Series)
* Aircraft Electrician
* Similar jobs
* Aircraft Electricians
* Aircraft Instrument Mechanics
* Electricians, Aircraft
* Mechanics, Aircraft Instrument
* Requirements
* Help
* Requirements
* Conditions of Employment
* National Guard Membership is required.
* Males born after 31 December 1959 must be registered for Selective Service.
* Federal employment suitability as determined by a background investigation.
* May be required to successfully complete a probationary period.
* Participation in direct deposit is mandatory

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How To Become An Aircraft Electrician

Many aircraft and avionics equipment mechanics and technicians learn their trade at an FAA-approved aviation maintenance technician school. Others enter with a high school education or equivalent and are trained on the job. Some workers enter the occupation after getting training in the military. Aircraft mechanics and avionics technicians typically are certified by the FAA. See Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) part 65, subparts D and E, for the most current requirements for becoming a certified mechanic.

Education and Training

Aircraft mechanics and service technicians often enter the occupation after attending a Part 147 FAA-approved aviation maintenance technician school. These schools award a certificate of completion that the FAA recognizes as an alternative to the experience requirements stated in regulations. The schools also grant holders the right to take the relevant FAA exams.

Some aircraft mechanics and service technicians enter the occupation with a high school diploma or equivalent and receive on-the-job training to learn their skills and to be able to pass the FAA exams. Other workers enter the occupation after getting training in the military. Aviation maintenance personnel who are not certified by the FAA work under supervision until they have enough experience and knowledge and become certified.

Avionics technicians typically earn an associate’s degree before entering the occupation. Aircraft controls, systems, and flight instruments have become increasingly digital and computerized. Maintenance workers who have the proper background in aviation flight instruments or computer repair are needed to maintain these complex systems.

Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations

Although aircraft and avionics equipment mechanics and technicians are not required to get licenses or certifications, most do, because these credentials often improve a mechanic’s wages and chances for employment. The FAA requires that aircraft maintenance be done either by a certified mechanic with the appropriate ratings or authorizations or under the supervision of such a mechanic.

The FAA offers separate certifications for bodywork (Airframe mechanics, or “A”) and engine work (Powerplant mechanics, or “P”), but employers may prefer to hire mechanics who have both Airframe and Powerplant (A&P) ratings. The A&P ratings generally certify that aviation mechanics meet basic knowledge and ability standards.

Mechanics must be at least 18 years of age, be fluent in English, and have 30 months of experience to qualify for either the A or the P rating or both (the A&P rating). If only one rating is sought by the mechanic, 18 months’ experience is required to take either the Airframe or the Powerplant exam. However, completion of a program at a Part 147 FAA-approved aviation maintenance technician school can substitute for the experience requirement and shorten the time requirements for becoming eligible to take the FAA exams.

Applicants must pass written, oral, and practical exams that demonstrate the required skills. Candidates must pass all the tests within a timeframe of 2 years.

To keep their certification, mechanics must have completed relevant repair or maintenance work within the previous 24 months. To fulfill this requirement, mechanics may take classes from their employer, a school, or an aircraft manufacturer.

Avionics technicians typically are certified through a repair station for the specific work being done, or else they hold the Airframe rating to work on an aircraft’s electronic and flight instrument systems. An Aircraft Electronics Technician (AET) certification is available through the National Center for Aerospace & Transportation Technologies (NCATT). It certifies that aviation mechanics have a basic level of knowledge in the subject area, but it is not required by the FAA for any specific tasks. Avionics technicians who work on communications equipment may need to have the proper radiotelephone operator certification issued by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC).

Other licenses and certifications are available to mechanics who wish to increase their skill set or advance their careers. The Inspection Authorization (IA) is available to mechanics who have had their A&P ratings for at least 3 years and meet other requirements. These mechanics are able to sign off on many major repairs and alterations. Mechanics can get numerous other certifications, such as Repairmen of light-sport aircraft and Designated Airworthiness Representative (DAR).

Important Qualities

Strength and agility. Mechanics and technicians may need to carry or move heavy equipment or aircraft parts. They may need to climb on airplanes, balance, and reach without falling.

Detail oriented. Mechanics and technicians need to adjust airplane parts to exact specifications. For example, they often use precision tools to tighten wheel bolts to an exact tension.

Dexterity. Mechanics and technicians must possess dexterity to coordinate the movement of their fingers and hands in order to grasp, manipulate, or assemble parts.

Observational skills. Mechanics and technicians must recognize engine noises, read gauges, and collect other information to determine whether an aircraft’s systems are working properly.

Troubleshooting skills. Mechanics and technicians diagnose complex problems, and they need to evaluate options to correct those problems.

Work Experience in a Related Occupation

Avionics technicians may begin their careers as aircraft mechanics and service technicians. As aircraft mechanics and service technicians gain experience, they may study independently, attend formal classes, or otherwise choose to pursue additional certifications that grant privileges to work on specialized flight instruments. Eventually, they may become dedicated avionics technicians who work exclusively on flight instruments.

Advancement

As aircraft mechanics gain experience, they may advance to lead mechanic, lead inspector, or shop supervisor. Opportunities are best for those who have an inspection authorization (IA). Many specialist certifications are available that allow mechanics to do a wider variety of repairs and alterations.

Mechanics with broad experience in maintenance and repair might become inspectors or examiners for the FAA.

Additional business and management training may help aircraft and avionics equipment mechanics and technicians open their own maintenance facility.

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Aircraft Electrician jobs

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Aircraft Electrician Demographics

Gender

  • Male

    90.3%
  • Female

    8.7%
  • Unknown

    1.0%

Ethnicity

  • White

    81.7%
  • Hispanic or Latino

    9.9%
  • Asian

    6.6%
  • Unknown

    1.2%
  • Black or African American

    0.6%
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Languages Spoken

  • Spanish

    40.0%
  • Chinese

    13.3%
  • Korean

    13.3%
  • German

    6.7%
  • Japanese

    6.7%
  • French

    6.7%
  • Mandarin

    6.7%
  • Arabic

    6.7%
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Aircraft Electrician

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Aircraft Electrician Education

Aircraft Electrician

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Top Skills for An Aircraft Electrician

ElectricalSystemsAvionicsSystemsTroubleshootTestEquipmentSafetyProceduresElectricalComponentsTroubleshotUh-60FlightControlSystemsHandToolsRadarDepotLevelMaintenanceTechnicalManualsAircraftMaintenanceOperationalChecksAircraftComponentsC-130WireHarnessesFlightLineTechnicalData

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Top Aircraft Electrician Skills

  1. Electrical Systems
  2. Avionics Systems
  3. Troubleshoot
You can check out examples of real life uses of top skills on resumes here:
  • Performed duties as an aircraft armament/electrical systems technical inspector.
  • Performed Depot Level Modifications on HH-65 avionics systems.
  • Performed aircraft electrical troubleshooting and maintenance on U.S. Army helicopters.
  • Set up and operated ground support and test equipment to perform functional and continuity tests of electrical and electronic systems.
  • Follow electrical drawings, schematics, safety procedures, military specifications and Standard and Technical Manuals to accomplish assigned tasks.

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