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Become An Archaeological Field Technician

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Working As An Archaeological Field Technician

  • Documenting/Recording Information
  • Evaluating Information to Determine Compliance with Standards
  • Processing Information
  • Getting Information
  • Monitor Processes, Materials, or Surroundings
  • Deal with People

  • $46,007

    Average Salary

What Does An Archaeological Field Technician Do

The key role of an Archaeological Field Technician is to conduct archaeological surveys, testing, and data recovery. They prepare accurate and concise laboratory documentation/mapping.

How To Become An Archaeological Field Technician

Environmental science and protection technicians typically need an associate’s degree or 2 years of postsecondary education, although some positions may require a bachelor’s degree.

Education

Environmental science and protection technicians typically need an associate’s degree in environmental science, environmental health, public health, or a related degree. Because of the wide range of tasks, environments, and industries in which these technicians work, there are jobs that do not require postsecondary education and others that require a bachelor’s degree.

A background in natural sciences is important for environmental science and protection technicians. Students should take courses in chemistry, biology, geology, and physics. Coursework in mathematics, statistics, and computer science also is useful because technicians routinely do data analysis and modeling.

Many schools offer internships and cooperative-education programs, which help students gain valuable experience while attending school. Internships and cooperative-education experience can enhance the students’ employment prospects.

Many technical and community colleges offer programs in environmental studies or a related technology, such as remote sensing or geographic information systems (GISs). Associate’s degree programs at community colleges traditionally are designed to easily transfer to bachelor’s degree programs at public colleges and universities.

Important Qualities

Analytical skills. Environmental science and protection technicians must be able to carry out a wide range of laboratory and field tests, and their results must be accurate and precise.

Communication skills. Environmental science and protection technicians must have good listening and writing skills, because they must follow precise directions for sample collection and communicate their results effectively in their written reports. They also may need to discuss their results with colleagues, clients, and sometimes public audiences.

Critical-thinking skills. Environmental science and protection technicians reach their conclusions through sound reasoning and judgment. They have to be able to determine the best way to address environmental hazards.

Interpersonal skills. Environmental science and protection technicians need to be able to work well and collaborate with others, because they often work with scientists and other technicians.

Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations

In some states, environmental science and protection technicians need a license to do certain types of environmental and health inspections. For example, some states require licensing for technicians who test buildings for radon. Licensure requirements vary by state but typically include certain levels of education and experience and a passing score on an exam.

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Archaeological Field Technician jobs

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Archaeological Field Technician Demographics

Gender

  • Female

    49.4%
  • Male

    48.9%
  • Unknown

    1.7%

Ethnicity

  • White

    83.1%
  • Hispanic or Latino

    9.4%
  • Asian

    4.9%
  • Unknown

    2.1%
  • Black or African American

    0.4%
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Languages Spoken

  • Spanish

    42.3%
  • German

    13.5%
  • French

    13.5%
  • Chinese

    3.8%
  • Greek

    3.8%
  • Mandarin

    3.8%
  • Danish

    1.9%
  • Cherokee

    1.9%
  • Hebrew

    1.9%
  • Dutch

    1.9%
  • Malay

    1.9%
  • Japanese

    1.9%
  • Hindi

    1.9%
  • Russian

    1.9%
  • Arabic

    1.9%
  • Italian

    1.9%
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Archaeological Field Technician

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Archaeological Field Technician Education

Archaeological Field Technician

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Top Skills for An Archaeological Field Technician

LaboratoryAnalysisGPSArchaeologicalPedestrianSurveyArchaeologicalReportsCulturalResourcePhaseIIIPipelineCorridorArchaeologicalSitesShovelTestPitsTotalStationPhaseIIArchaeologicalExcavationHistoricSitesGISTestUnitsShovelTestProbesDataCollectionHistoricArtifactIdentificationDataEntryDataRecovery

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Top Archaeological Field Technician Skills

  1. Laboratory Analysis
  2. GPS
  3. Archaeological Pedestrian Survey
You can check out examples of real life uses of top skills on resumes here:
  • Performed finds processing and laboratory analysis.
  • Documented sites using hand drawings, GPS unit and digital camera.
  • Researched previous archaeological reports for working projects.
  • Participated in a Phase II cultural resource management project at a historic site in Baltimore County, Maryland.
  • Worked on a Phase III cultural resource management project at Ft. Greeley, Alaska.

Top Archaeological Field Technician Employers