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Become An Asian Art Curator

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Working As An Asian Art Curator

  • Thinking Creatively
  • Judging the Qualities of Things, Services, or People
  • Getting Information
  • Communicating with Persons Outside Organization
  • Organizing, Planning, and Prioritizing Work
  • Mostly Sitting

  • $80,000

    Average Salary

What Does An Asian Art Curator Do

Archivists appraise, process, catalog, and preserve permanent records and historically valuable documents. Curators oversee collections of artwork and historic items, and may conduct public service activities for an institution. Museum technicians and conservators prepare and restore objects and documents in museum collections and exhibits.

Duties

Archivists typically do the following:

  • Authenticate and appraise historical documents and archival materials
  • Preserve and maintain documents and objects
  • Create and manage system to maintain and preserve electronic records
  • Organize and classify archival records to make them easy to search through
  • Safeguard records by creating film and digital copies
  • Direct workers who help arrange, exhibit, and maintain collections
  • Set and administer policy guidelines concerning public access to materials
  • Provide help to users
  • Find and acquire new materials for their archives  

Curators, museum technicians, and conservators typically do the following:

  • Acquire, store, and exhibit collections
  • Select the theme and design of exhibits
  • Design, organize, and conduct tours and workshops for the public
  • Attend meetings and civic events to promote their institution
  • Clean objects such as ancient tools, coins, and statues
  • Direct and supervise curatorial, technical, and student staff
  • Plan and conduct special research projects

Archivists preserve documents and records for their importance or historical significance. They coordinate educational and public outreach programs, such as tours, workshops, lectures, and classes. They also may work with researchers on topics and items relevant to their collections.

Some archivists specialize in an era of history so they can have a better understanding of the records from that period.

Archivists typically work with specific forms of records, such as manuscripts, electronic records, websites, photographs, maps, motion pictures, and sound recordings.

Curators, also known as museum directors, direct the acquisition, storage, and exhibition of collections, including negotiating and authorizing the purchase, sale, exchange, and loan of collections. They may authenticate, evaluate, and categorize the specimens in a collection.

Curators often oversee and help conduct their institution’s research projects and related educational programs. They may represent their institution in the media, at public events, at conventions, and at professional conferences.

Some curators who work in large institutions may specialize in a particular field, such as botany, art, or history. For example, a large natural history museum might employ separate curators for its collections of birds, fish, insects, and mammals.

Some curators focus primarily on taking care of their collections, others on researching items in their collections, and still others spend most of their time performing administrative tasks. In small institutions with only one or a few curators, one curator may be responsible for a number of tasks, from taking care of collections to directing the affairs of the museum.

Museum technicians, commonly known as registrars or collections specialists, concentrate on the care and safeguarding of the objects in museum collections and exhibitions. They oversee the logistics of acquisitions, insurance policies, risk management, and loaning of objects to and from the museum for exhibition or research. They keep detailed records of the conditions and locations of the objects that are on display, in storage, or being transported to another museum. They also maintain and store any documentation associated with the objects.

Museum technicians also may answer questions from the public and help curators and outside scholars use the museum’s collections.

Conservators handle, preserve, treat, and keep records of works of art, artifacts, and specimens—work that may require substantial historical, scientific, and archeological research. They document their findings and treat items to minimize deterioration or to restore them to their original state. Conservators usually specialize in a particular material or group of objects, such as documents and books, paintings, decorative arts, textiles, metals, or architectural material.

Some conservators use x rays, chemical testing, microscopes, special lights, and other laboratory equipment and techniques to examine objects, determine their condition, and decide on the best way to preserve them. They also may participate in outreach programs, research topics in their specialty, and write articles for scholarly journals.

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How To Become An Asian Art Curator

Most archivist, curator, and conservator positions require a master’s degree related to the position’s field. Museum technicians must have a bachelor’s degree. People often gain experience through an internship or by volunteering in archives and museums.

Education

Archivists. Archivists typically need a master’s degree in history, library science, archival science, political science, or public administration. Although many colleges and universities have history, library science, or other similar programs, only a few institutions offer master’s degrees in archival studies. Students may gain valuable archiving experience through volunteer or internship opportunities.

Curators. Curators typically need a master’s degree in art history, history, archaeology, or museum studies. Students with internship experience may have an advantage in the competitive job market.

In small museums, curator positions may be available to applicants with a bachelor’s degree. Because they also may have administrative and managerial responsibilities, courses in business administration, public relations, marketing, and fundraising are recommended.

Museum technicians. Museum technicians, commonly known as registrars, typically need a bachelor’s degree. Because few schools offer a bachelor’s degree in museum studies, it is common for registrars to obtain an undergraduate degree in a related field, such as art history, history, or archaeology. Some jobs may require candidates to have a master’s degree in museum studies. Museums may prefer candidates with knowledge of the museum’s specialty, training in museum studies, or previous experience working in museums.

Conservators. Conservators typically need a master’s degree in conservation or in a closely related field. Graduate programs last 2 to 4 years, the latter years of which include internship training. Only a few graduate programs in museum conservation techniques are offered in the United States. To qualify for entry into these programs, a student must have a background in chemistry, archaeology, studio art, or art history. Completing a conservation internship as an undergraduate can enhance admission prospects.

Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations

At this time, only a few employers require or prefer certification for archivists. However, archivists may choose to earn voluntary certification because it allows them to demonstrate expertise in a particular area.

The Academy of Certified Archivists offers the Certified Archivist credential. To earn certification, candidates must have a master’s degree, have professional archival experience, and pass an exam. They must renew their certification periodically by retaking the exam or fulfilling continuing education credits.

Other Experience

To gain marketable experience, candidates may have to work part time, as an intern or as a volunteer, during or after completing their education. Substantial experience in collection management, research, exhibit design, or restoration, as well as database management skills, is necessary for full-time positions.

Advancement

Continuing education is available through meetings, conferences, and workshops sponsored by archival, historical, and museum associations. Some large organizations, such as the U.S. National Archives and Records Administration in Washington, DC, offer in-house training.

Top museum positions are highly sought after and are competitive. Performing unique research and producing published work are important for advancement in large institutions. In addition, a doctoral degree may be needed for some advanced positions.

Museum workers employed in small institutions may have limited opportunities for promotion. They typically advance by transferring to a larger institution that has supervisory positions.

Important Qualities

Analytical skills. Archivists, curators, museum technicians, and conservators need excellent analytical skills to determine the origin, history, and importance of many of the objects they work with.

Computer skills. Archivists and museum technicians should have good computer skills because they use and develop complex databases related to the materials they store and access. 

Customer-service skills. Archivists, curators, museum technicians, and conservators work with the general public on a regular basis. They must be courteous and friendly and be able to help users find materials.

Organizational skills. Archivists, curators, museum technicians, and conservators must be able to store and easily retrieve records and documents. They must also develop logical systems of storage for the public to use.

Technical skills. Many historical objects need to be analyzed and preserved. Conservators must use the appropriate chemicals and techniques to preserve different objects, such as documents, paintings, fabrics, and pottery.

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Asian Art Curator Typical Career Paths

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Do you work as an Asian Art Curator?

Average Yearly Salary
$80,000
View Detailed Salary Report
$37,000
Min 10%
$80,000
Median 50%
$80,000
Median 50%
$80,000
Median 50%
$80,000
Median 50%
$80,000
Median 50%
$80,000
Median 50%
$80,000
Median 50%
$173,000
Max 90%
Best Paying Company
Yale University
Highest Paying City
Minneapolis, MN
Highest Paying State
North Dakota
Avg Experience Level
2.9 years
How much does an Asian Art Curator make at top companies?
The national average salary for an Asian Art Curator in the United States is $80,957 per year or $39 per hour. Those in the bottom 10 percent make under $37,000 a year, and the top 10 percent make over $173,000.

Real Asian Art Curator Salaries

Job Title Company Location Start Date Salary
Asian Gallery Consulting Curator Detroit Institute of Arts Detroit, MI Jan 09, 2016 $250,440
Curator of Chinese Art & Head of Asian Art Dept The Minneapolis Institute of Arts Minneapolis, MN Jun 20, 2011 $140,000
Pritzker Chair of Asian Art and Curator of Chinese Art The Art Institute of Chicago Chicago, IL Apr 01, 2015 $98,667 -
$200,000
Curator of Contemporary Art Cleveland Museum of Art Cleveland, OH May 23, 2016 $90,480
Curator of Contemporary Art The Cleveland Museum of Art Cleveland, OH Sep 15, 2015 $90,480
Curator of Chinese Art Peabody Essex Museum Salem, MA Sep 23, 2014 $75,000 -
$110,000
Curator of Indian and South Asian Art Peabody Essex Museum Salem, MA Sep 23, 2014 $75,000 -
$110,000
Curator of Chinese Art Peabody Essex Museum Salem, MA Sep 09, 2013 $75,000 -
$110,000
Curator of Indian and South Asian Art Peabody Essex Museum Salem, MA Jan 20, 2014 $75,000 -
$110,000
Curator of Chinese Art Cleveland Museum of Art Cleveland, OH Dec 09, 2016 $70,000 -
$110,000
Curator of The Indigenous Arts of Australia University of Virginia Charlottesville, VA Jan 09, 2016 $68,000
Curator of The Indigenous Arts of Australia University of Virginia Charlottesville, VA Oct 29, 2016 $68,000
Asian Art Specialist/Curator Heritage Capital Corporation Beverly Hills, CA Oct 01, 2015 $67,315
Asian Art Specialist/Curator Heritage Capital Corporation Dallas, TX Dec 10, 2015 $67,315
Art Content Curator Younow, Inc. New York, NY Nov 09, 2016 $65,000
Art Content Curator Younow, Inc. New York, NY Nov 14, 2016 $63,925
Art Content Curator Younow, Inc. New York, NY Nov 16, 2016 $63,925
Curator In Indian, Himalayan, and Southeast Asian The Art Institute of Chicago Chicago, IL Feb 18, 2010 $60,822
Curator of 19Th and 20Th Century European Art The San Diego Museum of Art San Diego, CA Oct 10, 2014 $60,549
Jane Chace Carroll Curator of Asian Art Trustees of The Smith College Northampton, MA Sep 21, 2015 $60,000
Curator of Russian Art and Artifacts The Museum of Russian Art Minneapolis, MN Apr 25, 2011 $59,155
Curator of Contemporary Art Museum of Fine Arts of St. Petersburg, Florida Saint Petersburg, FL Aug 01, 2016 $53,000

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Top 10 Best States for Asian Art Curators

  1. District of Columbia
  2. Connecticut
  3. New Jersey
  4. New York
  5. Massachusetts
  6. Alaska
  7. Missouri
  8. Nevada
  9. Colorado
  10. Vermont
  • (3 jobs)
  • (5 jobs)
  • (10 jobs)
  • (14 jobs)
  • (6 jobs)
  • (0 jobs)
  • (3 jobs)
  • (2 jobs)
  • (11 jobs)
  • (4 jobs)

Asian Art Curator Demographics

Gender

Female

55.8%

Male

34.6%

Unknown

9.6%
Ethnicity

White

59.3%

Hispanic or Latino

18.7%

Black or African American

11.5%

Asian

6.5%

Unknown

4.1%
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Foreign Languages Spoken

Japanese

50.0%

Tagalog

50.0%

Asian Art Curator Education

Schools

School of the Art Institute of Chicago

8.7%

University of Alabama at Birmingham

8.7%

Ball State University

8.7%

University of Texas at Arlington

4.3%

College of Southern Idaho

4.3%

Saint Anselm College

4.3%

Pratt Institute-Main

4.3%

Moore College of Art and Design

4.3%

Howard University

4.3%

University of Mississippi

4.3%

Ohio State University

4.3%

Kapi'olani Community College

4.3%

North Carolina School of the Arts

4.3%

University of Wisconsin - La Crosse

4.3%

California State University - Northridge

4.3%

University of California - Los Angeles

4.3%

University of Delaware

4.3%

Miami Dade College

4.3%

San Francisco State University

4.3%

Florida State University

4.3%
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Majors

Fine Arts

36.4%

General Education, Specific Areas

6.8%

Apparel And Textiles

4.5%

Photography

4.5%

Anthropology

4.5%

English

4.5%

Communication

4.5%

Electrical Engineering

4.5%

Education

4.5%

Psychology

2.3%

Entertainment Business

2.3%

Culinary Arts

2.3%

Agricultural Public Services

2.3%

Alternative And Complementary Medicine And Medical Systems

2.3%

Business

2.3%

Marketing

2.3%

Philosophy

2.3%

International Relations

2.3%

Economics

2.3%

Graphic Design

2.3%
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Degrees

Bachelors

39.1%

Masters

32.6%

Other

15.2%

Certificate

8.7%

Associate

4.3%
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