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Become An Assembler

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Working As An Assembler

  • Getting Information
  • Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates
  • Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events
  • Monitor Processes, Materials, or Surroundings
  • Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Material
  • Repetitive

  • Stressful

  • $24,220

    Average Salary

What Does An Assembler Do

Assemblers and fabricators assemble finished products and the parts that go into them. They use tools, machines, and their hands to make engines, computers, aircraft, ships, boats, toys, electronic devices, control panels, and more.

Duties

Assemblers and fabricators typically do the following:

  • Read and understand schematics and blueprints
  • Use hand tools or machines to assemble parts
  • Conduct quality control checks
  • Work closely with designers and engineers in product development

Assemblers and fabricators have an important role in the manufacturing process. They assemble both finished products and the pieces that go into them. The products encompass a full range of manufactured goods, including aircraft, toys, household appliances, automobiles, computers, and electronic devices.

Changes in technology have transformed the manufacturing and assembly process. Modern manufacturing systems use robots, computers, programmable motion-control devices, and various sensing technologies. These technological changes affect the way in which goods are made and the jobs of those who make them. Advanced assemblers must be able to work with these new technologies and use them to manufacture goods.

The job of an assembler or fabricator requires a range of knowledge and skills. Skilled assemblers putting together complex machines, for example, read detailed schematics that show how to assemble the machine. After determining how parts should connect, they use hand or power tools to trim, shim, cut, and make other adjustments to fit components together. Once the parts are properly aligned, they connect them with bolts and screws or weld or solder pieces together.

Quality control is important throughout the assembly process, so assemblers look for faulty components and mistakes in the assembly process. They help fix problems before defective products are made.

Manufacturing techniques are moving away from traditional assembly line systems toward lean manufacturing systems, which use teams of workers to produce entire products or components. Lean manufacturing has changed the nature of the assemblers’ duties.

It has become more common to involve assemblers and fabricators in product development. Designers and engineers consult manufacturing workers during the design stage to improve product reliability and manufacturing efficiency. Some experienced assemblers work with designers and engineers to build prototypes or test products.

Although most assemblers and fabricators are classified as team assemblers, others specialize in producing one type of product or perform the same or similar tasks throughout the assembly process.

The following are examples of types of assemblers and fabricators:

Aircraft structure, surfaces, rigging, and systems assemblers fit, fasten, and install parts of airplanes, space vehicles, or missiles, such as the wings, fuselage, landing gear, rigging and control equipment, and heating and ventilating systems.

Coil winders, tapers, and finishers wind wire coils of electrical components used in a variety of electric and electronic products, including resistors, transformers, generators, and electric motors.

Electrical and electronic equipment assemblers build products such as electric motors, computers, electronic control devices, and sensing equipment. Automated systems have been put in place because many small electronic parts are too small or fragile for human assembly. Much of the remaining work of electrical and electronic assemblers is done by hand during the small-scale production of electronic devices used in all types of aircraft, military systems, and medical equipment. Production by hand requires these workers to use devices such as soldering irons.

Electromechanical equipment assemblers assemble and modify electromechanical devices such as household appliances, computer tomography scanners, or vending machines. The workers use a variety of tools, such as rulers, rivet guns, and soldering irons.

Engine and machine assemblers construct, assemble, and rebuild engines, turbines, and machines used in automobiles, construction and mining equipment, and power generators.

Structural metal fabricators and fitters cut, align, and fit together structural metal parts and may help weld or rivet the parts together.

Fiberglass laminators and fabricators laminate layers of fiberglass on molds to form boat decks and hulls, bodies for golf carts, automobiles, and other products.

Team assemblers work on an assembly line, but they rotate through different tasks, rather than specializing in a single task. The team may decide how the work is assigned and how different tasks are done. Some aspects of lean production, such as rotating tasks and seeking worker input on improving the assembly process, are common to all assembly and fabrication occupations.

Timing device assemblers, adjusters, and calibrators do precision assembling or adjusting of timing devices within very narrow tolerances.

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How To Become An Assembler

The education level and qualifications needed to enter these jobs vary depending on the industry and employer. Although a high school diploma is enough for most jobs, experience and additional training is needed for more advanced assembly work.

Education

Most employers require a high school diploma or the equivalent for assembler and fabricator positions.

Training

Workers usually receive on-the-job training, sometimes including employer-sponsored technical instruction.

Some employers may require specialized training or an associate’s degree for the most skilled assembly and fabrication jobs. For example, jobs with electrical, electronic, and aircraft and motor vehicle products manufacturers typically require more formal education through technical schools. Apprenticeship programs are also available.

Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations

The Fabricators & Manufacturers Association, International (FMA) offers the Precision Sheet Metal Operator Certification (PSMO) and the Precision Press Brake Certification (PPB). Although not required, becoming certified can demonstrate competence and professionalism. It also may help a candidate advance in the profession.

In addition, many employers that hire electrical and electronic assembly workers, especially those in the aerospace and defense industries, require certifications in soldering.

Important Qualities

Color vision. Assemblers and fabricators who make electrical and electronic products must be able to distinguish different colors because the wires they work with often are color coded.

Dexterity. Assemblers and fabricators should have a steady hand and good hand-eye coordination, as they must grasp, manipulate, or assemble parts and components that are often very small.

Math skills. Assemblers and fabricators must know basic math and must be able to use computers, as the manufacturing process continues to advance technologically.

Mechanical skills. Modern production systems require assemblers and fabricators to be able to use programmable motion-control devices, computers, and robots on the factory floor.

Physical stamina. Assemblers and fabricators must be able to stand for long periods and perform repetitious work.

Physical strength. Assemblers and fabricators must be strong enough to lift heavy components or pieces of machinery. Some assemblers, such as those in the aerospace industry, must frequently bend or climb ladders when assembling parts.

Technical skills. Assemblers and fabricators must be able to understand technical manuals, blueprints, and schematics for a wide range of products and machines to properly manufacture the final product.

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6 Assembler jobs

Trek Bicycle Corporation
Rockville, MD
Assembler - Rockville

$24,960 Estimated

Planar Monolithics Industries, Inc.
Frederick, MD
Assembler

$24,960 Estimated

Builders Firstsource/Probuild
Frederick, MD
Assembler II Custom Millwork

$24,960 Estimated

Planar Monolithics Industries, Inc.
Frederick, MD
ASSEMBLER

$24,960 Estimated

Tad PGS, Inc.
Manassas, VA
Assembler

$24,220 Estimated

Peak Technical Staffing USA
Frederick, MD
Assembler (Sub Assembly in Sheet Metal)

$24,960 Estimated

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Real Assembler Salaries

Job Title Company Location Start Date Salary
Scene Assembler Blur Studio, Inc. Culver City, CA Sep 29, 2013 $75,000
Scene Assembler Blur Studio, Inc. Culver City, CA Sep 02, 2015 $65,000
Steel Tower Assemblers Sabre Communications Corp Dba Sabre Tubular Structures TX Apr 30, 2014 $36,335
Assembler III Builders First Source Fairfax, VA Jan 13, 2010 $32,620
Assembler III Builders First Source Fairfax, VA Jan 14, 2010 $32,620
Assembler III Builders First Source Fairfax, VA Jan 15, 2010 $32,620
Eletronic Assembler Creative R Us Pompano Beach, FL Feb 19, 2016 $28,475
Assembler Polaris Industries Manufacturing, LLC DBA Polaris MN Aug 01, 2011 $25,232
Assembler Marvin Windows and Doors, A Division of Marvin Lum MN Aug 01, 2011 $25,232
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Top Skills for An Assembler

PartNumbersAssemblyLineSmallHandToolsSafetyProceduresPackageCircuitBoardsQualityChecksAssemblyInstructionsAssemblyProceduresResponsibilitiesiPalletJackAirToolsTemporaryCustomerServiceElectricalComponentsQualityStandardsWireHarnessesSmallPartsCleanRoomEnvironmentBlueprintSpecifications

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Top Assembler Skills

  1. Part Numbers
  2. Assembly Line
  3. Small Hand Tools
You can check out examples of real life uses of top skills on resumes here:
  • Used list to dispense and receive information that included product codes, part numbers, quantities locations comments etc.
  • Proved ability to adapt by performing a variety of jobs on the production/assembly line.
  • Worked with small hand tools (drills screwdrivers, scrapers).
  • Follow all Safety procedures, perform related duties as assigned.
  • Transferred as needed to different departments including; Millwright, Test, Mount Paint and Package

Top Assembler Employers

What Kind Of Companies Hire an Assembler

  1. Whirlpool Corporation
  2. Wal-Mart
  3. Flextronics
  4. Aerotek
  5. Cardinal Health
  6. Randstad
  7. General Electric
  8. Covidien
  9. Manpower
  10. Caterpillar
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