FIND PERSONALIZED JOBS
Sign up to Zippia and discover your career options with your personalized career search.
×
FIND
PERSONALIZED JOBS

CONTENT HAS
BEEN UNLOCKED
Close this window to view unlocked content
or
find interesting jobs in

Log In

Log In to Save

Sign Up to Save

Sign Up to Dismiss

Sign Up

SIGN UP TO UNLOCK CONTENT

or

The email and password you specified are invalid. Please, try again.

Email and password are mandatory

Forgot Password?

Don't have an account? Sign Up

reset password

Enter your email address and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Back to Log In

Log In

Log In to Save

Sign Up to Save

Sign Up to Dismiss

Sign up to save the job and get personalized job recommendations.

Sign up to dismiss the job and get personalized job recommendations.

or

The email and password you specified are invalid. Please, try again.

Email and password are mandatory

Already have an account? Log in

reset password

Enter your email address and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Back to Log In

Company Saved

Answer a few questions and view jobs at that match your preferences.

Where do you want to work?

Job Saved

See your Saved Jobs now

or

find more interesting jobs in

Job Dismissed

Find better matching jobs in

Become An Assistant Planner

Where do you want to work?

To get started, tell us where you'd like to work.
Sorry, we can't find that. Please try a different city or state.

Working As An Assistant Planner

  • Developing Objectives and Strategies
  • Communicating with Persons Outside Organization
  • Getting Information
  • Performing for or Working Directly with the Public
  • Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates
  • Deal with People

  • Mostly Sitting

  • $53,791

    Average Salary

What Does An Assistant Planner Do

Urban and regional planners develop land use plans and programs that help create communities, accommodate population growth, and revitalize physical facilities in towns, cities, counties, and metropolitan areas.

Duties

Urban and regional planners typically do the following:

  • Meet with public officials, developers, and the public regarding development plans and land use
  • Administer government plans or policies affecting land use, the environment, zoning, historic buildings, public utilities, community facilities, housing, community design, and transportation
  • Gather and analyze market research data, censuses, and economic and environmental studies
  • Conduct field investigations to analyze factors affecting community development and decline, including land use
  • Review site plans submitted by developers
  • Assess the feasibility of proposals and identify needed changes
  • Recommend whether proposals should be approved or denied
  • Present projects to communities, planning officials, and planning commissions
  • Stay current on zoning or building codes, environmental regulations, and other legal issues

Urban and regional planners identify community needs and develop short- and long-term solutions to develop and revitalize communities and areas. For example, planners examine ideas for proposed facilities, such as schools, to ensure that these facilities will meet the needs of a changing population.

As an area grows or changes, planners help communities manage the related economic, social, and environmental issues, such as planning a new park, sheltering the homeless, and making the region more attractive to businesses.

Some planners work on broad, community-wide projects; others focus on specific issues. Ultimately, planners advocate the best use of a community’s land and resources for residential, commercial, industrial, educational, and recreational purposes.

When beginning a project, planners work with public officials, community members, and other groups to identify community issues and goals. Using research and data analysis, and collaborating with interest groups, they formulate strategies to address issues and to meet goals.

Planners also may help carry out community plans by overseeing projects and organizing the work of the groups involved. Projects may range from a policy recommendation for a specific initiative to a long-term, comprehensive area plan.

Urban and regional planners use a variety of tools and technology in their work, including geographic information systems (GIS) that analyze and manipulate data. GIS is used to integrate data with digital maps. For example, planners use GIS to overlay a land map with population density indicators. They also use statistical software, visualization and presentation programs, financial spreadsheets, and other database and software programs.

The following are examples of types of urban and regional planners:

Land use and code enforcement planners are concerned with the way land is used and whether development plans comply with codes, which are the standards and laws of a jurisdiction. These planners work to carry out effective planning and zoning policies and ordinances. For example, a planner may develop a policy to encourage development in an underutilized location and to discourage development in an environmentally sensitive area.

Transportation planners develop transportation plans and programs for an area. They identify transportation needs and issues, assess the impact of transportation services or systems, and anticipate and address future transportation patterns. For example, as growth outside the city creates more jobs, the need for public transportation to get workers to those jobs increases. Transportation planners develop and model possible solutions and explain the possibilities to planning boards and the public.

Environmental and natural resources planners attempt to mitigate the harmful effects of development on the environment. They may focus on conserving resources, preventing destruction of ecosystems, or cleaning polluted areas.

Economic development planners focus on the economic activities of an area. They may work to expand or diversify commercial activity, attract businesses, create jobs, or build housing.

Urban design planners strive to make building architecture, streets, and public spaces look and function in accordance with an area’s development and design goals. They combine planning with aspects of architecture and landscape architecture. Urban design planners focus on issues such as city layout, street design, and building and landscape patterns.

Show More

Show Less

How To Become An Assistant Planner

Urban and regional planners need a master’s degree from an accredited planning program to qualify for most positions.

Education

Most urban and regional planners have a master’s degree from an accredited urban or regional planning program. In 2015, there were 72 programs accredited by the Planning Accreditation Board that offered a master’s degree in planning.

Many master’s programs accept students with a wide range of undergraduate backgrounds. However, many candidates who enter master’s degree programs have a bachelor’s degree in economics, geography, political science, or environmental design.

Most master’s programs include spending considerable time in seminars, workshops, and laboratory courses, in which students learn to analyze and solve planning problems. Although most master’s programs have a similar core curriculum, they often differ in the courses they offer and the issues on which they focus. For example, programs located in agricultural states may focus on rural planning, and programs located in an area with high population density may focus on urban revitalization.

Some planners have a background in a related field, such as public administration, architecture, or landscape architecture.

Aspiring planners with a bachelor’s degree can qualify for a small number of jobs as assistant or junior planners. There are currently 15 accredited bachelor’s degree programs in planning. Candidates with a bachelor’s degree typically need work experience in planning, public policy, or a related field.

Other Experience

Although not necessary for all positions, some entry-level positions require 1 to 2 years of work experience in a related field, such as architecture, public policy, or economic development. Many students gain experience through real-world planning projects or part-time internships while enrolled in a master’s planning program. Others enroll in full-time internships after completing their degree.

Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations

As of 2015, New Jersey was the only state that required urban and regional planners to be licensed, although Michigan required registration to use the title “community planner.” More information can be requested from the regulatory boards of New Jersey and Michigan.

The American Institute of Certified Planners (AICP) offers the professional AICP Certification for planners. To become certified, candidates must meet certain education and experience requirements and pass an exam. Certification must be maintained every 2 years. Although certification is not required for all planning positions, some organizations prefer to hire certified planners.

Important Qualities

Analytical skills. Urban and regional planners analyze information and data from a variety of sources, such as market research studies, censuses, and environmental impact studies. They use statistical techniques and technologies such as geographic information systems (GIS) in their analyses to determine the significance of the data.

Communication skills. Urban and regional planners must be able to communicate clearly and effectively because they often give presentations and meet with a wide variety of audiences, including public officials, interest groups, and community members.

Decisionmaking skills. Urban and regional planners must weigh all possible planning options and combine analysis, creativity, and realism to choose the appropriate action or plan.

Management skills. Urban and regional planners must be able to manage projects, which may include overseeing tasks, planning assignments, and making decisions.

Writing skills. Urban and regional planners need strong writing skills because they often prepare research reports, write grant proposals, and correspond with colleagues and stakeholders.

Show More

Show Less

Do you work as an Assistant Planner?

Assistant Planner Jobs

NO RESULTS

Aw snap, no jobs found.

Add To My Jobs

Do you work as an Assistant Planner?

Help others decide if this is a good career for them

Do you work as an Assistant Planner?

Assistant Planner Demographics

Gender

Female

61.6%

Male

35.8%

Unknown

2.6%
Ethnicity

White

59.1%

Hispanic or Latino

15.4%

Asian

11.3%

Black or African American

10.2%

Unknown

4.0%
Show More
Foreign Languages Spoken

Spanish

36.9%

French

10.7%

Chinese

9.5%

Mandarin

8.3%

Italian

6.0%

Cantonese

4.8%

German

3.6%

Russian

2.4%

Korean

2.4%

Japanese

2.4%

Thai

2.4%

Portuguese

1.2%

Basque

1.2%

Hebrew

1.2%

Amharic

1.2%

Malayalam

1.2%

Hindi

1.2%

Tagalog

1.2%

Sindhi

1.2%

Arabic

1.2%
Show More

Assistant Planner Education

Schools

Fashion Institute of Technology

8.7%

California State Polytechnic University - Pomona

7.1%

Pennsylvania State University

7.1%

Michigan State University

6.3%

University of Phoenix

6.3%

Florida State University

5.6%

Syracuse University

4.8%

New York University

4.8%

University of California - Berkeley

4.8%

Arizona State University

4.8%

Portland State University

4.8%

University of Florida

4.8%

Pace University - New York

4.0%

LIM College

4.0%

California Polytechnic State University-San Luis Obispo

4.0%

University of Southern California

4.0%

University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee

4.0%

University of Arizona

4.0%

University of Wisconsin - Stout

3.2%

San Francisco State University

3.2%
Show More
Majors

Business

20.3%

Urban Planning

17.5%

Marketing

8.3%

Communication

6.5%

Specialized Sales And Merchandising

5.5%

Management

4.8%

Geography

4.3%

Economics

3.8%

Environmental Science

3.5%

Psychology

3.5%

Public Relations

3.0%

Finance

2.8%

Health Care Administration

2.5%

Public Administration

2.3%

Accounting

2.3%

Family And Consumer Sciences/Human Sciences Business Services

2.0%

History

2.0%

Advertising

2.0%

Natural Resources Management

1.8%

Fine Arts

1.8%
Show More
Degrees

Bachelors

50.0%

Masters

27.7%

Other

12.7%

Certificate

4.0%

Associate

3.1%

Doctorate

1.8%

Diploma

0.6%

License

0.2%
Show More

Job type you want
Full Time
Part Time
Internship
Temporary

Real Assistant Planner Salaries

Job Title Company Location Start Date Salary
Assistant Planner City of Foster City Foster City, CA Apr 02, 2012 $75,372
Assistant Planner Metropolitan Planning Group, Inc. Mountain View, CA Sep 13, 2016 $68,871 -
$73,045
Assistant Planner Saks & Company LLC New York, NY Jun 25, 2015 $56,760
Assistant Planner WZI Incorporated Bakersfield, CA Oct 01, 2009 $55,000
Assistant Planner WZI Inc. Bakersfield, CA Oct 08, 2009 $55,000
Assistant Planner WZI Inc. Bakersfield, CA Sep 08, 2010 $55,000
Assistant Planner PB Americas, Inc. Denver, CO Jan 20, 2012 $50,000
Assistant Planner Puget Sound Regional Council Seattle, WA Aug 16, 2014 $47,016
Assistant Planner, Engagement Team The Martin Agency New York, NY Sep 09, 2015 $44,637 -
$54,400
Assistant Planner BBDO USA LLC New York, NY Jun 06, 2011 $40,500
Assistant Planner City of Phoenix Phoenix, OR Oct 01, 2014 $38,797 -
$49,525
Assistant Planner City of Phoenix Phoenix, OR Apr 11, 2011 $37,128 -
$47,375
Assistant Planner City of Phoenix Phoenix, OR Oct 03, 2011 $37,128 -
$47,375

No Results

To get more results, try adjusting your search by changing your filters.

Show More

How Would You Rate The Salary Of an Assistant Planner?

Have you worked as an Assistant Planner? Help other job seekers by rating your experience as an Assistant Planner.

Top Skills for An Assistant Planner

Show More

  1. Inventory Levels
  2. New Merchandise
  3. Purchase
You can check out examples of real life uses of top skills on resumes here:
  • Facilitate monthly forecast collaboration meetings with suppliers to ensure adequate inventory levels to maximize product availability and minimize supply chain inventory.
  • Assisted Shipping/Receiving for incoming shipments and reviewed contents against purchase order for accuracy.
  • Develop store plans by department and vendor to drive sales by store in conjunction with the total department and vendor goals.
  • Completed detailed research, issued permits and received/documented/deposited cash payments.
  • Draft amendments to city ordinances designed to facilitate community development objectives.

How Would You Rate Working As an Assistant Planner?

Are you working as an Assistant Planner? Help us rate Assistant Planner as a Career.

Rank:

Average Salary:

Top 10 Best States for Assistant Planners

  1. Nevada
  2. Oregon
  3. District of Columbia
  4. Washington
  5. California
  6. Alaska
  7. Massachusetts
  8. Colorado
  9. Maryland
  10. Rhode Island
  • (29 jobs)
  • (72 jobs)
  • (17 jobs)
  • (96 jobs)
  • (328 jobs)
  • (5 jobs)
  • (69 jobs)
  • (94 jobs)
  • (109 jobs)
  • (7 jobs)

Top Assistant Planner Employers

Show More

Jobs From Top Assistant Planner Employers

Related to your recently viewed content