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An assistant professor of criminal justice assists professors at colleges or universities and teaches undergraduate and graduate students, focusing on criminal justice. Their responsibilities usually include preparing coursework and lesson plans, administering examinations, grading tests and quizzes, arranging activities, and monitoring the students' progress. They may also participate in mentoring and training teaching assistants, coordinating with internal and external parties, and performing clerical tasks such as processing documents and organizing files. In the absence of the professor, an assistant professor may also assume their duties to maintain an efficient learning environment.

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Assistant Professor Of Criminal Justice Responsibilities

Here are examples of responsibilities from real assistant professor of criminal justice resumes representing typical tasks they are likely to perform in their roles.

  • Upload class attendance and student grades to university platform, and manage LMS (Moodle) for student interaction and participation.
  • Identify and implement effective marketing strategies to target prospective students for the online and on-campus programs.
  • Ensure all documents are properly authorize and support according to department policies, procedures, regulatory practices, and legal requirements.
  • Assist in back-office operations and provide impeccable customer service.

Assistant Professor Of Criminal Justice Job Description

When it comes to understanding what an Assistant Professor Of Criminal Justice does, you may be wondering, "should I become an Assistant Professor Of Criminal Justice?" The data included in this section may help you decide. Compared to other jobs, Assistant Professors Of Criminal Justice have a growth rate described as "much faster than average" at 11% between the years 2018 - 2028, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. In fact, the number of Assistant Professor Of Criminal Justice opportunities that are predicted to open up by 2028 is 155,000.

Assistant Professors Of Criminal Justice average about $29.12 an hour, which makes the Assistant Professor Of Criminal Justice annual salary $60,574. Additionally, Assistant Professors Of Criminal Justice are known to earn anywhere from $34,000 to $107,000 a year. This means that the top-earning Assistant Professors Of Criminal Justice make $73,000 more than the lowest earning ones.

Once you've become an Assistant Professor Of Criminal Justice, you may be curious about what other opportunities are out there. Careers aren't one size fits all. For that reason, we discovered some other jobs that you may find appealing. Some jobs you might find interesting include a Law Enforcement Instructor, Law Enforcement Technician, Justice, and Professor.

Assistant Professor Of Criminal Justice Jobs You Might Like

0 Assistant Professor Of Criminal Justice Resume Examples

Assistant Professor Of Criminal Justice Skills and Personality Traits

We calculated that 26% of Assistant Professors Of Criminal Justice are proficient in Sociology, PHD, and Law Enforcement. They’re also known for soft skills such as Interpersonal skills, Speaking skills, and Writing skills.

We break down the percentage of Assistant Professors Of Criminal Justice that have these skills listed on their resume here:

  • Sociology, 26%

    Served as academic advisor for students majoring in Criminal Justice and Sociology Faculty Advisor to Criminal Justice Club

  • PHD, 25%

    Worked closely with other Research Assistants, lead PhD student and Faculty Advisor on the Children of Incarcerated Parents Project.

  • Law Enforcement, 18%

    Analyzed and summarized federal and state cases pertaining to law enforcement use of excessive force and disability discrimination claims, respectively.

  • Criminal Cases, 6%

    Assigned to federal and state drug interdiction task force to investigate high level criminal cases involving drug smuggling and related crimes.

  • Undergraduate Courses, 6%

    Teach Microcomputer Application and Business/Management undergraduate courses

  • Course Content, 4%

    Assess quality of course content and recommend program revisions and new curriculum in compliance with various accrediting agencies.

Most Assistant Professors Of Criminal Justice list "Sociology," "PHD," and "Law Enforcement" as skills on their resumes. We go into more details on the most important Assistant Professor Of Criminal Justice responsibilities here:

  • Interpersonal skills can be considered to be the most important personality trait for an Assistant Professor Of Criminal Justice to have. According to a Assistant Professor Of Criminal Justice resume, "Most postsecondary teachers need to be able to work well with others and must have good communication skills to serve on committees and give lectures." Assistant Professors Of Criminal Justice are able to use Interpersonal skills in the following example we gathered from a resume: "Assisted customers with merchandise questions, and frequently promoted customer service and interpersonal skills to all customers. "
  • Another trait important for fulfilling Assistant Professor Of Criminal Justice duties is Speaking skills. According to a Assistant Professor Of Criminal Justice resume, "Postsecondary teachers need good verbal skills to give lectures." Here's an example of how Assistant Professors Of Criminal Justice are able to utilize Speaking skills: "Developed and presented two classes (Networks and Technical Management) online"
  • Another skill that is quite popular among Assistant Professors Of Criminal Justice is Writing skills. This skill is very critical to fulfilling every day responsibilities as is shown in this example from a Assistant Professor Of Criminal Justice resume: "Postsecondary teachers need to be skilled writers to publish original research and analysis." This example from a resume shows how this skill is used: "Tutor college students online and conduct virtual writing training sessions for individuals and classes through Adobe Connect. "
  • See the full list of Assistant Professor Of Criminal Justice skills.

    Before becoming an Assistant Professor Of Criminal Justice, 49.5% earned their bachelor's degree. When it comes down to graduating with a master's degree, 20.0% Assistant Professors Of Criminal Justice went for the extra education. If you're wanting to pursue this career, it may be impossible to be successful with a high school degree. In fact, most Assistant Professors Of Criminal Justice have a college degree. But about one out of every ten Assistant Professors Of Criminal Justice didn't attend college at all.

    Those Assistant Professors Of Criminal Justice who do attend college, typically earn either a Criminal Justice degree or a Law degree. Less commonly earned degrees for Assistant Professors Of Criminal Justice include a Sociology degree or a Psychology degree.

    Once you're ready to become an Assistant Professor Of Criminal Justice, you should explore the companies that typically hire Assistant Professors Of Criminal Justice. According to Assistant Professor Of Criminal Justice resumes that we searched through, Assistant Professors Of Criminal Justice are hired the most by Texas A&M; University-Corpus Christi, University of South Carolina, and Northern Arizona University. Currently, Texas A&M; University-Corpus Christi has 4 Assistant Professor Of Criminal Justice job openings, while there are 3 at University of South Carolina and 2 at Northern Arizona University.

    But if you're interested in companies where you might earn a high salary, Assistant Professors Of Criminal Justice tend to earn the biggest salaries at Pace University, Texas Wesleyan University, and University of Baltimore. Take Pace University for example. The median Assistant Professor Of Criminal Justice salary is $107,428. At Texas Wesleyan University, Assistant Professors Of Criminal Justice earn an average of $85,772, while the average at University of Baltimore is $85,623. You should take into consideration how difficult it might be to secure a job with one of these companies.

    View more details on Assistant Professor Of Criminal Justice salaries across the United States.

    The three companies that hire the most prestigious assistant professor of criminal justices are:

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    What Law Enforcement Instructors Do

    In this section, we take a look at the annual salaries of other professions. Take Law Enforcement Instructor for example. On average, the Law Enforcement Instructors annual salary is $5,299 lower than what Assistant Professors Of Criminal Justice make on average every year.

    While the salaries between these two careers can be different, they do share some of the same responsibilities. Employees in both Assistant Professors Of Criminal Justice and Law Enforcement Instructors positions are skilled in Law Enforcement, Criminal Cases, and Course Content.

    There are some key differences in responsibilities as well. For example, an Assistant Professor Of Criminal Justice responsibilities require skills like "Sociology," "PHD," "Undergraduate Courses," and "Blackboard." Meanwhile a typical Law Enforcement Instructor has skills in areas such as "Lesson Plans," "Incident Response," "Defensive Tactics," and "Training Programs." This difference in skills reveals how truly different these two careers really are.

    Law Enforcement Instructors receive the highest salaries in the Professional industry coming in with an average yearly salary of $57,956. But Assistant Professors Of Criminal Justice are paid more in the Education industry with an average salary of $58,410.

    Law Enforcement Instructors tend to reach lower levels of education than Assistant Professors Of Criminal Justice. In fact, Law Enforcement Instructors are 5.7% less likely to graduate with a Master's Degree and 21.7% less likely to have a Doctoral Degree.

    What Are The Duties Of a Law Enforcement Technician?

    A law enforcement technician is responsible for communicating with field units and emergency services to support the functions of the police department. Typical duties include assessing the appropriate dispatch unit to respond, collaborating with other law enforcement agencies, and fielding incoming calls. Additionally, you will be responsible for monitoring inventories, re-stocking supplies, and scheduling maintenance. As a law enforcement technician, you may perform clerical and administrative duties such as storing evidence, filing reports, and entering data. You are also responsible for coordinating the repair and maintenance of facility vehicles.

    Next up, we have the Law Enforcement Technician profession to look over. This career brings along a lower average salary when compared to an Assistant Professor Of Criminal Justice annual salary. In fact, Law Enforcement Technicians salary difference is $10,435 lower than the salary of Assistant Professors Of Criminal Justice per year.

    While the salary may be different for these job positions, there is one similarity and that's a few of the skills needed to perform certain duties. We used info from lots of resumes to find that both Assistant Professors Of Criminal Justice and Law Enforcement Technicians are known to have skills such as "Law Enforcement," "Criminal Cases," and "Emergency. "

    While some skills are similar in these professions, other skills aren't so similar. For example, several resumes showed us that Assistant Professor Of Criminal Justice responsibilities requires skills like "Sociology," "PHD," "Undergraduate Courses," and "Course Content." But a Law Enforcement Technician might use skills, such as, "General Public," "Federal Laws," "Office Procedures," and "Public Safety."

    On average, Law Enforcement Technicians earn a lower salary than Assistant Professors Of Criminal Justice. There are industries that support higher salaries in each profession respectively. Interestingly enough, Law Enforcement Technicians earn the most pay in the Government industry with an average salary of $51,067. Whereas, Assistant Professors Of Criminal Justice have higher paychecks in the Education industry where they earn an average of $58,410.

    In general, Law Enforcement Technicians study at lower levels of education than Assistant Professors Of Criminal Justice. They're 14.9% less likely to obtain a Master's Degree while being 21.7% less likely to earn a Doctoral Degree.

    How a Justice Compares

    Justices are court officials in charge of making the final decision of cases on the Supreme Court and appeals courts. They can be appointed or elected by the higher court officials. While they do not hold trials, they review documentation that comes from lower courts before decision making. They hear oral argumentation on certain cases from attorneys. Full court justices decide on combining prominent or more complex cases. They also issue a well-written legal opinion.

    The Justice profession generally makes a lower amount of money when compared to the average salary of Assistant Professors Of Criminal Justice. The difference in salaries is Justices making $10,281 lower than Assistant Professors Of Criminal Justice.

    Using Assistant Professors Of Criminal Justice and Justices resumes, we found that both professions have similar skills such as "Law Enforcement," "Criminal Cases," and "Powerpoint," but the other skills required are very different.

    As mentioned, these two careers differ between other skills that are required for performing the work exceedingly well. For example, gathering from Assistant Professors Of Criminal Justice resumes, they are more likely to have skills like "Sociology," "PHD," "Undergraduate Courses," and "Course Content." But a Justice might have skills like "Customer Service," "Procedures," "Facility," and "Public Safety."

    When it comes to education, Justices tend to earn lower education levels than Assistant Professors Of Criminal Justice. In fact, they're 8.5% less likely to earn a Master's Degree, and 17.3% less likely to graduate with a Doctoral Degree.

    Description Of a Professor

    A professor is a teaching professional who provides instructions to students on various academic and vocational subjects in colleges, universities, and vocational schools. Professors design curriculums for courses and ensure that they meet college and department students. They continuously conduct research and experiments so that advanced knowledge in their field is completed. They share their research and works by publishing them in books and academic journals. They also provide assistance to graduating students.

    The fourth career we look at typically earns higher pay than Assistant Professors Of Criminal Justice. On average, Professors earn a difference of $97,833 higher per year.

    According to resumes from both Assistant Professors Of Criminal Justice and Professors, some of the skills necessary to complete the responsibilities of each role are similar. These skills include "Sociology," "PHD," and "Undergraduate Courses. "

    Each job requires different skills like "Law Enforcement," "Criminal Cases," "Diversity," and "CJ," which might show up on an Assistant Professor Of Criminal Justice resume. Whereas Professor might include skills like "Philosophy," "Theory," "Mathematics," and "C++."

    In general, Professors make a higher salary in the Education industry with an average of $125,264. The highest Assistant Professor Of Criminal Justice annual salary stems from the Education industry.

    In general, Professors reach similar levels of education when compared to Assistant Professors Of Criminal Justice resumes. Professors are 4.9% more likely to earn their Master's Degree and 10.8% less likely to graduate with a Doctoral Degree.