What is a Barista

Without baristas, the world would probably fall apart. How else would we get our coffee? Baristas are in charge of collecting our demanding coffee orders and making the drinks. Whether it's just a hot coffee or a pumpkin spice latte with extra whip, almond milk and 3 pumps of caramel, baristas are the reason the world goes round.

Since you're in charge of getting coffee and espresso drinks for customers, you might stumble into some grumpy people. You know those shirts that say, "don't talk to me until after I've had my coffee"? Those kind of people. Between those customers and long lines of drink orders, the job of a barista can be stressful at times.

Typically, baristas work in standalone coffee shops, but there are some who work at malls or even hospitals. The majority of your shift will be spent standing, so it's time to invest in some good shoes.

There is more than meets the eye when it comes to being a barista. For example, did you know that they make an average of $11.85 an hour? That's $24,656 a year!

Between 2018 and 2028, the career is expected to grow 14% and produce 775,300 job opportunities across the U.S.

What Does a Barista Do

There are certain skills that many baristas have in order to accomplish their responsibilities. By taking a look through resumes, we were able to narrow down the most common skills for a person in this position. We discovered that a lot of resumes listed communication skills, customer-service skills and physical strength.

Learn more about what a Barista does

How To Become a Barista

If you're interested in becoming a barista, one of the first things to consider is how much education you need. We've determined that 42.8% of baristas have a bachelor's degree. In terms of higher education levels, we found that 2.0% of baristas have master's degrees. Even though some baristas have a college degree, it's possible to become one with only a high school degree or GED.

Choosing the right major is always an important step when researching how to become a barista. When we researched the most common majors for a barista, we found that they most commonly earn bachelor's degree degrees or high school diploma degrees. Other degrees that we often see on barista resumes include associate degree degrees or diploma degrees.

You may find that experience in other jobs will help you become a barista. In fact, many barista jobs require experience in a role such as cashier. Meanwhile, many baristas also have previous career experience in roles such as sales associate or server.

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Average Salary
$24,656
Average Salary
Job Growth Rate
14%
Job Growth Rate
Job Openings
63,700
Job Openings
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Barista Career Paths

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Average Salary for a Barista

Baristas in America make an average salary of $24,656 per year or $12 per hour. The top 10 percent makes over $30,000 per year, while the bottom 10 percent under $20,000 per year.
Average Salary
$24,656
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Barista Resumes

Designing and figuring out what to include on your resume can be tough, not to mention time-consuming. That's why we put together a guide that is designed to help you craft the perfect resume for becoming a Barista. If you're needing extra inspiration, take a look through our selection of templates that are specific to your job.

Learn How To Write a Barista Resume

At Zippia, we went through countless Barista resumes and compiled some information about how to optimize them. Here are some suggestions based on what we found, divided by the individual sections of the resume itself.

View Barista Resume Examples And Templates

Barista Demographics

Barista Gender Statistics

female

66.1 %

male

29.2 %

unknown

4.6 %

Barista Ethnicity Statistics

White

64.1 %

Hispanic or Latino

15.1 %

Black or African American

11.5 %

Barista Foreign Languages Spoken Statistics

Spanish

57.7 %

French

10.8 %

German

4.4 %
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Barista Education

Barista Majors

14.7 %

Barista Degrees

Bachelors

42.8 %

High School Diploma

30.4 %

Associate

17.2 %
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Online Courses For Barista That You May Like

Fundamentals of Logistics, Supply Chain & Customer Service
udemy
4.5
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Learn Logistics, Supply Chain and Customer Service. 3 Courses in 1...

SAP Customer Service (CS/SM) - Service Management module
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Real World SAP CS and SD, Repair Orders, Service Orders, Service Contracts...

Customer Service Mastery: Delight Every Customer
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4.6
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Master Customer Service using this practical customer care course...

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Top Skills For a Barista

The skills section on your resume can be almost as important as the experience section, so you want it to be an accurate portrayal of what you can do. Luckily, we've found all of the skills you'll need so even if you don't have these skills yet, you know what you need to work on. Out of all the resumes we looked through, 20.9% of baristas listed food products on their resume, but soft skills such as communication skills and customer-service skills are important as well.

  • Food Products, 20.9%
  • High Volume, 13.8%
  • Presentation Standards, 7.1%
  • Consistent Attendance, 6.3%
  • Customer Service, 6.2%
  • Other Skills, 45.7%
  • See All Barista Skills

12 Barista RESUME EXAMPLES

Best States For a Barista

Some places are better than others when it comes to starting a career as a barista. The best states for people in this position are Alaska, Maine, Vermont, and Oregon. Baristas make the most in Alaska with an average salary of $28,605. Whereas in Maine and Vermont, they would average $27,877 and $27,851, respectively. While baristas would only make an average of $27,807 in Oregon, you would still make more there than in the rest of the country. We determined these as the best states based on job availability and pay. By finding the median salary, cost of living, and using the Bureau of Labor Statistics' Location Quotient, we narrowed down our list of states to these four.

1. Washington

Total Barista Jobs:
714
Highest 10% Earn:
$38,000
Location Quotient:
1.82
Location Quotient is a measure used by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) to determine how concentrated a certain industry is in a single state compared to the nation as a whole. You can read more about how BLS calculates location quotients here

2. Oregon

Total Barista Jobs:
301
Highest 10% Earn:
$41,000
Location Quotient:
1.35
Location Quotient is a measure used by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) to determine how concentrated a certain industry is in a single state compared to the nation as a whole. You can read more about how BLS calculates location quotients here

3. Maine

Total Barista Jobs:
49
Highest 10% Earn:
$34,000
Location Quotient:
0.69
Location Quotient is a measure used by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) to determine how concentrated a certain industry is in a single state compared to the nation as a whole. You can read more about how BLS calculates location quotients here
Full List Of Best States For Baristas

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Barista FAQs

Can I be a barista with no experience?

Yes, you can be a barista with no experience.

You can attend training courses to learn the history of coffee and specific ways of making espresso and coffee drinks. That can help you stand out from other candidates. However, some jobs may not require it, as a more experienced barista can train you at your place of employment.

In addition, baristas often work in places where other beverages and food are served. Having experience and knowing how to conduct yourself in a food environment, such as knowing food safety guidelines, can help obtain a barista position.

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Can a 14-year-old be a barista?

Yes, a 14-year-old can be a barista. However, 14-year-olds have restrictions for when they can work, how long they can work, as well as what kind of work they're allowed to do.

Under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), young people below 18 years of age have specific standards for work so that they don't jeopardize their health, well-being, or education.

According to the U.S. Department of Labor, 14-year-olds can only work outside school hours, but no more than three hours during a school day. They can't work more than eight hours on a non-school day and no more than 18 hours/week during school sessions.

Inside the workplace itself, 14-year-olds are limited to low-risk duties, such as cashiering, table service, and cleaning inside the workplace itself. They may perform kitchen work such as using toasters, milkshake blenders, and coffee grinders. Also, they may perform limited cooking duties involving electric or gas grills.

Some of the things they are not allowed to do are baking activities, dealing with oil-power-driven machines like food grinders, or working in freezers.

Because a typical coffee place doesn't have high-risk equipment and environment, a 14-year-old could work as a barista.

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Do baristas only make coffee?

No, baristas do not only make coffee. It depends on the employer and the place of employment.

For example, Starbucks serves more than just coffee, offering options like tea and frappuccinos. However, their employees are still called baristas, and they also handle coffee drinks. A specialty coffee house may offer espresso-based drinks solely like lattes and cappuccinos.

Technically, baristas prepare espresso-based drinks and coffee drinks such as French press coffee and drip coffee. They have experience in preparing them and knowledge about the different types of coffee around the world.

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How do you become a barista for beginners?

To become a barista, for beginners, it's important to learn the world of coffee. With no experience or prior training, it's essential to familiarize yourself in this beverage-making industry. Learn barista terminology and coffee terms such as "aeration" and "emulsifying."

You can learn via credible online sources or by taking a barista training course. You can also patron coffee houses and shops often to observe or talk to baristas.

To be a well-rounded, skilled barista, it would be advantageous to learn the history of coffee, the different kinds in the world, and specialized skills like latte art and making cold-brew coffee.

Overall, it's essential to understand that the duties of a barista are more than making drinks. It often includes interacting with customers, handling the cash register, and preparing food. If you can become familiar with the workplace environment and understand how to conduct yourself professionally, then you're at a good spot to begin searching for barista jobs and interviewing.

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Is a male barista a baristo?

No, a male barista is not a baristo. The term barista is gender-neutral. Its etymology comes from the Italian word "barista," which means a bartender. Baristas typically work behind a counter, usually serving coffee and other non-alcoholic drinks and snacks.

The hypercorrection word "baristo" most likely stems from misinterpreting the singular ending -a as feminine and thus substituting it to the masculine singular ending -o.

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What is a female barista called?

A female barista is called a barista. The term "barista" is gender-neutral. Its etymology comes from the Italian word "barista," which means a bartender. The current term in the United States typically refers to employees at coffee houses such as Starbucks.

The confusion may stem from the rise of the term "baristo" to distinguish male baristas. However, it's linguistically inaccurate.

In English, the plural version is "baristas." However, in Italian, the plural versions are gender-specific: "bariste" (feminine) and "baristi" (masculine).

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What qualifications do you need to be a barista?

You do not need qualifications to be a barista. It doesn't require any formal college education, and often employers can train you on the job.

Typically, at minimum, you only need a high school diploma. Some baristas go on to enroll in barista training courses and even specialize in specific skills. In general, the more you practice, the more you become familiar with various coffee processes and become better at making drinks.

It's important to remember that a barista doesn't only make drinks. Baristas may handle cash, prepare food, and interact with customers. So, job descriptions may ask for these skills.

Lastly, having a willingness to learn, a positive attitude, and patience will be helpful as the nature of the job requires lots of practice.

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