What is a Biomedical Engineer

A Biomedical Engineer's work varies from designing prosthetics and artificial organs to creating and developing technology used to monitor, diagnose, and heal patients, as well as monitoring and testing equipment, and software and offering training to the medical staff using it, and so on.

As a scientist who hopes to bridge the gap between and even fuse two complex branches of knowledge - medicine and engineering - biomedical engineering has various areas of study within it.

To work as such a Biomedical Engineer you will need to obtain at least a Bachelor's degree in Biomedical Engineering or a related field. Gaining certain certifications and going through accredited programs might be a wise investment for the future of your career.

What Does a Biomedical Engineer Do

Biomedical engineers combine engineering principles with medical and biological sciences to design and create equipment, devices, computer systems, and software used in healthcare.

Learn more about what a Biomedical Engineer does

How To Become a Biomedical Engineer

Biomedical engineers typically need a bachelor’s degree in biomedical engineering or bioengineering from an accredited program in order to enter the occupation. Alternatively, they can get a bachelor’s degree in a different field of engineering and then either choose biological science electives or get a graduate degree in biomedical engineering.

Education

Prospective biomedical engineering or bioengineering students should take high school science courses, such as chemistry, physics, and biology. They should also take math courses, including algebra, geometry, trigonometry, and calculus. Courses in drafting or mechanical drawing and in computer programming are also useful.

Bachelor’s degree programs in biomedical engineering and bioengineering focus on engineering and biological sciences. Programs include laboratory-based courses, in addition to classroom-based courses, in subjects such as fluid and solid mechanics, computer programming, circuit design, and biomaterials. Other required courses may include biological sciences, such as physiology.

Accredited programs also include substantial training in engineering design. Many programs include co-ops or internships, often with hospitals and medical device and pharmaceutical manufacturing companies, to provide students with practical applications as part of their study. Biomedical engineering and bioengineering programs are accredited by ABET.

Important Qualities

Analytical skills. Biomedical engineers must be able to analyze the needs of patients and customers to design appropriate solutions.

Communication skills. Because biomedical engineers sometimes work with patients and frequently work on teams, they must be able to express themselves clearly. They must seek others’ ideas and incorporate those ideas into the problem-solving process.

Creativity. Biomedical engineers must be creative to come up with innovative and integrative advances in healthcare equipment and devices.

Math skills. Biomedical engineers use the principles of calculus and other advanced topics in mathematics, as well as statistics, for analysis, design, and troubleshooting in their work.

Problem-solving skills. Biomedical engineers typically deal with and solve problems in complex biological systems.

Advancement

Biomedical engineers typically receive greater responsibility through experience and more education. To lead a research team, a biomedical engineer generally needs a graduate degree. Some biomedical engineers attend medical or dental school to specialize in applications at the forefront of patient care, such as using electric impulses in new ways to get muscles moving again. Some earn law degrees and work as patent attorneys. Others pursue a master’s degree in business administration (MBA) and move into managerial positions. For more information, see the profiles on lawyers and architectural and engineering managers.

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Average Salary
$76,625
Average Salary
Job Growth Rate
4%
Job Growth Rate
Job Openings
25,615
Job Openings
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Average Salary for a Biomedical Engineer

Biomedical Engineers in America make an average salary of $76,625 per year or $37 per hour. The top 10 percent makes over $98,000 per year, while the bottom 10 percent under $59,000 per year.
Average Salary
$76,625
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Biomedical Engineer Demographics

Biomedical Engineer Gender Statistics

male

67.9 %

female

25.1 %

unknown

7.0 %

Biomedical Engineer Ethnicity Statistics

White

59.1 %

Asian

19.8 %

Hispanic or Latino

12.7 %

Biomedical Engineer Foreign Languages Spoken Statistics

Spanish

36.8 %

French

13.8 %

Arabic

8.0 %
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Biomedical Engineer Education

Biomedical Engineer Majors

Biomedical Engineer Degrees

Bachelors

65.0 %

Masters

16.0 %

Associate

12.1 %

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Doctorate

Top Colleges for Biomedical Engineers

1. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Cambridge, MA • Private

In-State Tuition
$51,832
Enrollment
4,550

2. Stanford University

Stanford, CA • Private

In-State Tuition
$51,354
Enrollment
7,083

3. University of Florida

Gainesville, FL • Private

In-State Tuition
$6,381
Enrollment
34,564

4. University of California - San Diego

La Jolla, CA • Private

In-State Tuition
$14,167
Enrollment
30,279

5. California State University - Long Beach

Long Beach, CA • Private

In-State Tuition
$6,798
Enrollment
31,503

6. Northeastern University

Boston, MA • Private

In-State Tuition
$51,522
Enrollment
13,760

7. University of Pennsylvania

Philadelphia, PA • Private

In-State Tuition
$55,584
Enrollment
10,764

8. Georgia Institute of Technology

Atlanta, GA • Private

In-State Tuition
$12,424
Enrollment
15,201

9. Cornell University

Ithaca, NY • Private

In-State Tuition
$55,188
Enrollment
15,105

10. Yale University

New Haven, CT • Private

In-State Tuition
$53,430
Enrollment
5,963
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Online Courses For Biomedical Engineer That You May Like

Biomedical Equipment Technician Training: Maintenance & Repair
edX (Global)

Maintaining and troubleshooting sophisticated medical instruments is not an easy task. In order to deliver effective care, the technician requires the knowledge of different aspects of biology and engineering. The different devices work in so many different ways and the literature about repair and troubleshooting is often hard to come by. It can be quite frustrating to search for solutions every time the operator encounters a problem. There is added pressure because the availability of medical...

Introduction to Biomedical Engineering
coursera

The course is aimed at university-level students of all engineering backgrounds, who would like to learn the basics of modern biomedical engineering, including the development of human-robotic interfaces and systems such as bionic prosthetics. The course is covering the practical basics of almost everything that a modern biomedical engineer is required to know: electronics, control theory, microcontrollers (Arduino), and high-level programming (MATLAB). All covered disciplines do not require any...

Introduction to Biomedical Imaging
edX (Global)

Imaging technologies form a significant component of the health budgets of all developed economies, and most people need advanced imaging such as MRIs, X-Rays and CT Scans (or CAT Scans) during their life. Many of us are aware of the misinformation sometimes offered in TV dramas, which either exaggerates the benefits or overemphasizes the risks. This medical imaging course provides an introduction to biomedical imaging and modern imaging modalities. The course also covers the basic scientific...

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Top Skills For a Biomedical Engineer

The skills section on your resume can be almost as important as the experience section, so you want it to be an accurate portrayal of what you can do. Luckily, we've found all of the skills you'll need so even if you don't have these skills yet, you know what you need to work on. Out of all the resumes we looked through, 8.0% of Biomedical Engineers listed Medical Devices on their resume, but soft skills such as Analytical skills and Communication skills are important as well.

12 Biomedical Engineer RESUME EXAMPLES

Best States For a Biomedical Engineer

Some places are better than others when it comes to starting a career as a Biomedical Engineer. The best states for people in this position are Minnesota, Wyoming, Oregon, and Connecticut. Biomedical Engineers make the most in Minnesota with an average salary of $90,514. Whereas in Wyoming and Oregon, they would average $88,771 and $86,810, respectively. While Biomedical Engineers would only make an average of $86,123 in Connecticut, you would still make more there than in the rest of the country. We determined these as the best states based on job availability and pay. By finding the median salary, cost of living, and using the Bureau of Labor Statistics' Location Quotient, we narrowed down our list of states to these four.

1. Oregon

Total Biomedical Engineer Jobs:
169
Highest 10% Earn:
$127,000
Location Quotient:
1.39
Location Quotient is a measure used by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) to determine how concentrated a certain industry is in a single state compared to the nation as a whole. You can read more about how BLS calculates location quotients here

2. Wyoming

Total Biomedical Engineer Jobs:
16
Highest 10% Earn:
$126,000
Location Quotient:
0.91
Location Quotient is a measure used by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) to determine how concentrated a certain industry is in a single state compared to the nation as a whole. You can read more about how BLS calculates location quotients here

3. Maryland

Total Biomedical Engineer Jobs:
327
Highest 10% Earn:
$121,000
Location Quotient:
1.76
Location Quotient is a measure used by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) to determine how concentrated a certain industry is in a single state compared to the nation as a whole. You can read more about how BLS calculates location quotients here
Full List Of Best States For Biomedical Engineers

How Do Biomedical Engineer Rate Their Jobs?

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5.0

Rewarding profession.June 2019

5.0

Zippia Official LogoRewarding profession.June 2019

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