Campbell Soup Company History Timeline

(886 Jobs)
1869

In 1869 Joseph A. Campbell and Abraham Anderson started producing canned vegetables, jellies, condiments, minced meats and, of course, soups.

1869 The origins of the Campbell Soup Company lie in 19th Century America, when fruit merchant, Joseph A Campbell partnered up with icebox manufacturer Abraham Anderson to form the Joseph A Campbell Preserve Company.

The company was started in 1869 by Joseph A. Campbell, a fruit merchant from Bridgeton, New Jersey, and Abraham Anderson, an icebox manufacturer from South Jersey.

In 1869 Philadelphia produce merchant Joseph Campbell became Anderson's partner, forming Anderson and Campbell.

In 1869 Philadelphia produce merchant Joseph Campbell became Anderson’s partner, forming Anderson and Campbell.

In 1869, Philadelphia produce merchant Joseph Campbell became Anderson’s partner, forming Anderson and Campbell.

Campbell Soup Company was founded in Camden, New Jersey, in 1869 as a partnership between Abram Anderson (an icebox manufacturer) and Joseph Campbell (a fruit merchant) to produce canned tomatoes and vegetables, jellies, soups, condiments, and minced meats.

The Campbell Soup Company, created by Joseph Campbell and Abraham Anderson in 1869, has grown to become the number one wet soup company in the world.

1876

Joseph Campbell retires, ending the association of the original founders, with Abraham Anderson having previously left the partnership in 1876.

In 1876, Anderson left the partnership and the company became the “Joseph A. Campbell Preserve Company”.

In 1876 Anderson and Campbell dissolved their partnership and Campbell bought Anderson's share of the business, changing its name to Joseph Campbell & Company.

In 1876 Anderson and Campbell dissolved their partnership and Campbell bought Anderson’s share of the business, changing its name to Joseph Campbell Preserve Company.

In 1876, Anderson left the partnership and Arthur Dorrance and Joseph Campbell formed a new partnership, beginning a long-term association between the Dorrance family and the company.

In 1876 Anderson and Campbell dissolved their partnership and Campbell bought Anderson's share of the business, changing the business name to the Joseph A. Campbell Preserve Company.

In 1876, Anderson left the partnership and the company became the "Joseph A. Campbell Preserve Company". Anderson's son, Campbell Speelman, split paths with his father and continued to work at Campbell's as a creative director, originally designing the Campbell's Soup Cans.

1882

In 1882 a partnership was formed between Campbell's son-in-law, Walter S. Spackman; Campbell's nephew, Joseph S. Campbell; and Arthur Dorrance, Spackman's personal friend who brought a cash infusion to the partnership.

In 1882 a partnership was formed between Campbell’s son-in-law, Walter S. Spackman; Campbell’s nephew, Joseph S. Campbell; and Arthur Dorranee, Spademan’s personal friend who brought a cash infusion to the partnership.

In 1882 a partnership was formed between Campbell's son-in-law, Walter S. Spackman; Campbell's nephew, Joseph S. Campbell; and Arthur Dorrance, Spackman's personal friend, who brought more cash to the partnership.

1894

Campbell retired in 1894 and was succeeded by Dorrance.

1896

Campbell reorganized into “Joseph Campbell & Co.” in 1896.

In 1896 the company built a large factory in Camden and expanded its product line to include prepared meats, sauces, canned fruits, ketchup, and plum pudding.

Campbell reorganized into "Joseph Campbell & Co." in 1896.

1897

In 1897, a major landmark occurred when Arthur Dorrance, the general manager of the company, reluctantly hired his 24-year-old nephew.

In 1897, Dr John T Dorrance invented condensed soup.

Doctor Dorrance quickly made his mark on history with the invention of condensed soup in 1897.

However, this all changed in 1897 when the company’s manager, Arthur Dorrance, reluctantly hired his nephew to join the team.

In 1897, Dorrance's 24-year-old nephew, Doctor John T. Dorrance, joined the company.

In 1897 Arthur Dorrance hired his nephew, John Thompson Dorrance, a chemical engineer and organic chemist who invented a method of successfully canning condensed soup.

In 1897, John T. Dorrance, a nephew of the general manager Arthur Dorrance, began working for the company at a wage of $7.50 a week.

1898

1898 The original labels for Campbell’s condensed tomato soup line were actually orange and blue, but this all changed in 1898 when the company’s treasurer, Herberton L. Williams, thought a red and white scheme would be more fitting.

In 1898, Herberton Williams, a Campbell’s executive, convinced the company to adopt a carnelian red and bright white color scheme, because he was taken by the crisp carnelian red color of the Cornell University football team’s uniforms.

In 1898, Herberton Williams, a Campbell's executive, convinced the company to adopt a carnelian red and bright white color scheme, because he was taken by the crisp carnelian red color of the Cornell University football team's uniforms.

1899

By 1899 John Dorrance had successfully developed a method of canning condensed soup.

1900

In 1900, Campbell's soups won the Gold Medallion for excellence at the Paris Exposition.

The final and most recognisable version is modelled on the medal the company received at the Paris Exposition Universelle in 1900 as a symbol of excellence.

John Dorrance became director of the company in 1900.

John Dorrance became director of the company in 1900 and soon after the company was renamed the Joseph Campbell Company.

John Dorrance became director of the company in 1900, and sometime not long after the company became the Joseph Campbell Company.

John Dorrance became director of the company in 1900 and soon after, the company was renamed the Joseph Campbell Company.

1902

In 1902 Chef DeLisle became the first executive chef of Campbell’s.

1904

In 1904, the cherubic Campbell Kids were introduced in a series of trolley car advertisements, as a way to appeal to working mothers.

By 1904 the company sold 16 million cans of soup a year.

By 1904 the company was selling 16 million cans of soup a year.

In 1904, the company developed its "Campbell Kids" campaign as a marketing device to sell soup and, in the same year, 16 million cans of Campbell soup were sold.

1905

As the company began increasing the variety of soups it offered, it began canning less produce, eventually leading, in 1905, to a change in company name to Joseph Campbell Company.

1911

Boasting 21 varieties of soup by this time, Campbell began to eye a bigger market; in 1911 Campbell began selling its products in California, thus becoming one of the first companies to serve the entire nation.

In 1911 Campbell expanded its business into California, and became one of the first companies to serve the entire nation.

1912

In 1912 Campbell began growing its own produce in an effort to standardize quality.

1913

1913 Campbell’s Cream of Celery Soup is introduced.

1914

J.T. Dorrance became president of the company in 1914.

1915

In 1915 Dorrance became sole owner of Campbell when he bought out his uncle, Arthur Dorrance.

Meantime, in 1915, Campbell acquired the Franco-American Food Company.

In 1915, Dorrance became sole owner of Campbell when he bought out his uncle, Arthur Dorrance.

Campbell bought Franco-American in 1915.

1916

The idea to use condensed soup in recipes originated in a cookbook entitled "Helps for the Hostess" that was published in 1916.

1916 In the early 20th century, people began recognising the benefits of using condensed soup in their recipes – thanks in part to the cookbook ‘Helps for the Hostess’, published in 1916.

The first of many Campbell cookbooks, Helps for the Hostess, was published in 1916.

Campbell's soup also had an impact on the way Americans prepared meals; as early as 1916, recipes using condensed soup as an ingredient appeared in cookbooks.

1921

In 1921 Campbell acquired the Franco-American Food Company, and the next year the company was renamed the Campbell Soup Company.

In 1921 Campbell acquired the Franco-American Food Company, and the next year the company was incorporated as the Campbell Soup Company.

1922

Campbell Soup was founded on November 23, 1922 and is headquartered in Camden, NJ.”

The idea became so hot with Americans that in 1922, the company formally adopted "Soup" as its middle name.

1922 By the 20th century, the popularity of Campbell’s condensed soups was so great, the company decided to adopt ‘Soup’ as its middle name.

In 1922 the company was incorporated as the Campbell Soup Company, centering the company on its most famous and profitable product.

In 1922, the company changed its name to the Campbell Soup Company.

The company was incorporated as the Campbell Soup Company in 1922.

1923

In 1923 Arthur C. Dorrance, John Dorrance’s brother, became Campbell’s general manager.

1929

John Dorrance and Chef Louis Charles DeLisle celebrating his Order of Chevalier du Merite (Knight of Merit) award in 1929.

In 1929 Arthur C. Dorrance was made a director and vice-president of the board of directors.

In 1929 the company opened a second major facility in Chicago.

In 1929, Arthur C. Dorrance was made a director and vice president of the board of directors.

1930

When John Dorrance died in 1930, Arthur C. Dorrance was elected president.

1931

Campbell began backing these introductions with radio advertising in 1931, using the famous "M'm! M'm! Good!" slogan.

1938

After the program’s adaptation of The War of the Worlds became a sensation for accidentally starting a mass panic due to its realism, Campbell’s took over as sponsor of the radio theater program in December 1938.

After the program's adaptation of The War of the Worlds became a sensation for accidentally starting a mass panic due to its realism, Campbell's took over as sponsor of the radio theater program in December 1938.

The acquisition includes a manufacturing location based in Napoleon, Ohio, opened in 1938.

1941

Meantime, the company published its first full-length cookbook in 1941, titling it Easy Ways to Good Meals.

1942

In 1942 sales topped $100 million for the first time.

1946

Arthur C. Dorrance died in 1946, and James McGowen, Jr., became president.

In 1946 Arthur C. Dorrance died and James McGowen, Jr. became president.

In 1946 Arthur C. Dorrance died and James McGowen Jr. became president.

1948

Perhaps best known are the “Campbell Kids” designed by illustrator Grace Drayton.Ronald Reagan was a spokesman for V8 when Campbell’s acquired the brand in 1948.

Ronald Reagan was a spokesman for V8 when Campbell's acquired the brand in 1948.

1950

When television made its way to American homes in the 1950’s, Campbell introduced TV commercials, and some 40 years later, the Campbell Kids were found dancing to rap songs on the small screen.

1950 The first Campbell television adverts air in the USA, and the company goes on to sponsor popular TV shows, Lassie and Peter Pan.

In 1950 the first Campbell television commercials were broadcast.

1953

In the midst of this growth, W.B. Murphy was elected president, following McGowan's retirement in 1953.

In the midst of this growth, W. B. Murphy was elected president, following McGowan’s retirement in 1953.

In the midst of this growth, W.B. Murphy was elected president, following McGowan’s retirement in 1953.

1958

In 1958 sales exceeded $500 million for the first time and Campbell established Campbell's Soups, S.p.A. in Italy.

In 1958 sales exceeded $500 million for the first time and Campbell established Campbell’s Soups, S.p.A. in Italy.

1961

In 1961 Campbell acquired Pepperidge Farm, Incorporated, a maker of quality baked goods, and a similar Belgian company, Biscuits Delacre.

In 1961 Campbell acquired Pepperidge Farm, a maker of quality baked goods, and a similar Belgian company, Biscuits Delacre.

In 1961 the Campbell Soup Company acquired Pepperidge Farm.

1962

1962 Artist Andy Warhol famously used the red and white Campbell’s Soup packaging design to create a series of 32 pop art silkscreened paintings – each representing a flavour from the brand’s condensed soup line.

1966

Also in 1966 Campbell formed Godiva Chocolatier to distribute the Belgian-made chocolates in the United States.

1969

Campbell created Champion Valley Farms, Inc., a pet food concern, in 1969.

Campbell created Champion Valley Farms, a pet food concern, in 1969.

Finally, in 1969, Campbell created Champion Valley Farms, a pet food concern.

1970

Campbell, which had built its fortune on Dorrance's invention of condensed soup, introduced the Chunky brand of ready-to-serve soups in 1970.

1971

In 1971, for the first time, Campbell's sales topped $1 billion.

In 1971, for the first time, Campbell’s sales topped $1 billion.

In 1971 sales for the first time topped $1 billion.

1972

In 1972 Murphy retired and was replaced as president by Harold A. Shaub.

In 1972 Murphy retired and was replaced by President Harold A. Shaub.

1973

In 1973 Campbell acquired Pietro's Pizza Parlors, a chain based in the Pacific Northwest.

In 1973 Campbell acquired Pietro’s Pizza Parlors, a chain based in the Pacific Northwest.

In 1973 Campbell acquired Pietro’s Pizza Parlors, a chain of restaurants in the Pacific Northwest.

1974

In 1974 the company completed a purchase of the European Godiva company and became its sole owner.

1978

In 1978 Campbell purchased Vlasic Foods, Inc., a Michigan-based producer of pickles and similar condiments, for approximately $35 million in capital stock.

In 1978 Campbell purchased Vlasic Foods, a Michigan-based producer of pickles and similar condiments, for approximately $35 million in capital stock.

In 1978 Campbell made one of its largest acquisitions ever when it purchased Vlasic Foods, a Michigan-based producer of pickles and similar condiments, for about $35 million in capital stock.

1979

The Vlasic acquisition was followed in 1979 by the acquisitions of seven small European food-producing companies and three small domestic operations.

1980

In June 1980 the company entered the debt market with a $100 million ten-year offering.

In June of 1980 the company entered the debt market with a $100 million ten-year offering.

To sustain these growth-oriented policies, Campbell broke with its life-long tradition of relying on internally generated funds to finance its efforts and, for the first time, entered the debt market in June, 1980 with a $100 million, ten-year offering.

Also in 1980 Campbell acquired additional bakery, pasta, and pickle operations.

In 1980 R. Gorden McGovern succeeded Shaub as president and Campbell made two acquisitions—Swift-Armour S.A. Argentina and a small American poultry processing plant used by Swanson for its frozen chicken dinners.

In 1980 R. Gorden McGovern succeeded Shaub as president and Campbell made two acquisitions—Swift-Armour S.A. Argentina and a small American poultry-processing plant used by Swanson for its frozen chicken dinners.

Also in 1980, Campbell acquired additional bakery, pasta, and pickle operations.

In 1980 R. Gorden McGovern succeeded Shaub as president and Campbell made two acquisitions: Swift-Armour S.A. Argentina and a small American poultry-processing plant used by Swanson for its frozen chicken dinners.

1981

The company acquired Snow King Frozen Foods, a large producer of uncooked frozen specialty meats, and introduced the wildly successful Prego spaghetti sauce nationally in 1981.

In 1981 McGovern reorganized Campbell's management structure, dividing the company into two new divisions—Campbell United StatesA. and Campbell International—and about 50 business groups.

In 1981 McGovern reorganized management structure, dividing the company into two new divisions—Campbell United StatesA. and Campbell International—and about 50 business groups.

Paul’s Kitchens, a processor of frozen prepared seafood and vegetables. It also acquired Snow King Frozen Foods, a large producer of uncooked frozen specialty meats, and introduced the wildly successful Prego spaghetti sauce nationally in 1981.

1982

Also in 1982, Juice Bowl Products, a fruit juice processor, was acquired.

In 1982 Campbell acquired Mrs.

1983

One of the most important facets of McGovern’s makeover was his goal of positioning the company with consumers as “somebody who is looking after their well-being,” McGovern told Business Week in 1983.

1984

In 1984 John T. Dorrance, Jr., the son of condensed soup's inventor, retired as chairman of the board and became director of the board's executive committee.

In 1984 John T. Dorrance Jr., the son of condensed soup’s inventor, retired as chairman of the board and became director of the board’s executive committee.

In 1984 John T. Dorrance Jr., the son of the inventor of condensed soup, retired as chairman of the board and became director of the board’s executive committee.

In 1984 John T. Dorrance, Jr., the son of condensed soup’s inventor, retired as chairman of the board and became director of the board’s executive committee.

1985

The Cape Cod Potato Chip Hyannis Factory opened in 1985, where visitors can stop by for a self-guided tour.

In 1985, however, the company decided to cut back on new product gambles and McGovern reevaluated his goals and returned the company's focus to product quality and efficiency.

The company purchased a Belgian food producer and 20 percent of Arnotts Ltd., an Australian biscuit manufacturer, in 1985.

In 1985, however, the company decided to cut back on new-product gambles and McGovern reevaluated his goals and returned the company’s focus to product quality and efficiency.

In 1985 the company decided to cut back on new-product gambles and McGovern reevaluated his goals and returned the company’s focus to product quality and efficiency.

A Belgian food producer and 20% of Arnotts Ltd., an Australian biscuit manufacturer, were purchased in 1985.

In 1985, however, the company decided to cut back on new product gambles and McGovern reevaluated his goals and returned the company’s focus to product quality and efficiency.

1986

In 1986 the company bought two more American food companies and established Campbell Enterprises to oversee non-grocery products.

1987

In 1987 the company sold its disappointing Valley Farms pet food, Triangle physical fitness, and Juice Works beverage businesses.

By 1987 McGovern began selling off some of Campbell's less successful ventures.

In 1987 the company sold its disappointing pet food, Triangle physical fitness, and Juice Works beverage businesses.

By 1987 McGovern began selling off some of Campbell’s less-successful ventures.

By 1987 McGovern began selling off some of Campbell’s less successful ventures.

1988

In 1988 the Pietro's pizza and Annabelle's restaurants were also sold, taking Campbell out of the restaurant business entirely.

In 1988 the Pietro’s pizza and Annabelle’s restaurants were also sold, taking Campbell out of the restaurant business entirely.

1989

Campbell's management crisis was exacerbated by the death, in April 1989, of John Dorrance.

Campbell’s management crisis was exacerbated by the death, in April of 1989, of John Dorrance.

Campbell’s management crisis was exacerbated by the death, in April 1989, of John Dorrance.

But Chairman Vlasic had loaded the board with family members loyal to the company (six of the 15 board members are family members, including John Dorrance’s three children), so a proxy battle seems unlikely. Its management crisis was exacerbated by the death, in April, 1989, of John Dorrance.

McGovern—who failed in an attempt to merge the company with the Quaker Oats Company in 1989—left Campbell that same year.

McGovern left Campbell in late 1989.

McGovern—who failed in an attempt to merge the company with Quaker Oats in 1989—left Campbell that same year.

1990

The cookie subsidiary of Campbell Soup, Campbell Biscuits Europe, got a head start on the market in February 1990, when it reorganized its European corporate structure, consolidated marketing, and standardized packaging.

The cookie subsidiary of Campbell Soup, Campbell Biscuits Europe, got a head start on the market in February of 1990, when it reorganized its European corporate structure, consolidated marketing, and standardized packaging.

1991

By June 1991, Johnson had closed or sold 20 plants worldwide, reduced the company's 51,700 person workforce by 15.5 percent, and pulled unprofitable lines from store shelves.

By June of 1991, Johnson had closed or sold 20 plants worldwide, reduced the company’s 51,700 person work force by 15.5 percent, and pulled unprofitable lines from store shelves.

By June 1991, Johnson had closed or sold 20 plants worldwide, reduced the company’s 51,700 person workforce by 15.5 percent, and pulled unprofitable lines from store shelves.

Saporito, Bill. "Campbell Soup Gets Piping Hot." Fortune, September 9, 1991.

Late in 1991, Campbell also focused on the impending European Community's single market, which promised 344 million consumers (50 percent more than the United States) and had potential for future growth.

By the end of 1991, some indicators showed that Johnson's efforts had paid off: Campbell's earnings through the first three quarters of 1991 had risen 33 percent, making the company's profits the second fastest-growing in the food industry.

But some analysts warned that the profits came at the expense of core brand promotion, which was cut in 1991.

He was posthumously inducted into Junior Achievement’s National Business Hall of Fame in 1991.

Late in 1991, Campbell also focused on the impending European Community’s single market, which promised 344 million consumers (50 percent more than the United States) and had potential for future growth.

By the end of 1991, some indicators showed that Johnson’s efforts had paid off: Campbell’s earnings through the first three quarters of 1991 had risen 33 percent, making the company’s profits the second-fastest growing in the food industry.

Campbell’s good performance, maintenance of high stock prices ($80 in mid-1991), and 58 percent Dorrance family ownership has staved off any threat of takeover by such giants as Philip Morris and Unilever.

By the end of 1991, some indicators showed that Johnson’s efforts had paid off: Campbell’s earnings through the first three quarters of 1991 had risen 33 percent, making the company’s profits the second fastest-growing in the food industry.

1992

In 1992 the company made bolder goals, with a vision expressed as "Campbell Brands Preferred Around the World." The plan made further preparations for the European Community's single market and expanded those efforts around the world.

In 1992 the company made bolder goals, with a vision expressed as “Campbell Brands Preferred Around the World.” The plan made further preparations for the European Community’s single market and expanded those efforts around the world.

1993

In 1993 Vlasic retired as chairman, with Johnson taking on this additional title.

The company recorded a $300 million restructuring charge in 1993 in relation to the divestment of several underperforming units.

In addition to a big push into the Mexican soup market, the company in 1993 began selling V8 vegetable juice in Europe and established a joint venture with Nakano Vinegar Co.

The company recorded a $300 million restructuring charge in 1993 in relation to the divestment of several underper-forming units.

In 1993, the company took a $300-million restructuring charge to reduce staffing and close and consolidate various operations in order to renew the company's solid financial status.

1994

1994 Campbell’s celebrates its 125th anniversary.

1995

"campbell soup co. debuts first ever co-branded product partnering swanson frozen foods with american's favorite soup." frozen food digest, december 1995.

Later in 1995, the company picked up Greenfield Healthy Foods, the number one maker of fat-free brownies and cookies for the health and convenience store markets, and Fresh Start Bakeries, a supplier of baked goods to fast-food restaurants.

Just weeks after Conant began at Campbell, the company announced its biggest acquisition since the 1995 purchase of Pace.

In 1995 it resigned from the Pepperidge Farm and Goldfish crackers account, reportedly because of a business conflict, and agency Saatchi & Saatchi/New York took over the account.

In 1995, Campbell purchased Pace Foods in San Antonio, the leading United States producer of salsa, for $1.1 billion.

1996

grant, linda. "stirring it up at campbell." fortune, 13 may 1996.

ono, yumiko. "campbell outlines broad reorganization; plans include cutting jobs and brands, buying firm and $160 million charge." the wall street journal, 6 september 1996.

The family's power was soon diminished somewhat, after Bennett's brother, John T. Dorrance III, sold most of his stake in the company by late 1996, leaving the family in control of 44 percent of the stock.

Paul's frozen seafood line was sold to Pillsbury Co.'s Van de Kamp's unit in 1996.

Replacing him was Harvey Golub, former chairman and CEO of American Express Company and a Campbell director since 1996.

The family’s power was soon diminished somewhat, after Bennett’s brother, John T. Dorrance III, sold most of his stake in the company by late 1996, leaving the family in control of 44 percent of the stock.

Paul’s frozen seafood line was sold to Pills-bury Co.’s Van de Kamp’s unit in 1996.

In 1996, Campbell's Pepperidge Farm unit "re-launched" its Milano cookies and Goldfish crackers with new marketing strategies.

The company's Franco American unit increased marketing support for its core Spagettios brand in 1996, leading to a 15 percent sales increase.

However, when it acquired Erasco, Germany's number one soup company in 1996, Campbell increased its international soup sales by almost 40 percent.

As of 1996, Campbell held only 10 percent of the non-United States market for soup, which amounted to $5 billion in retail sales.

Campbell's international strategy in soups was to customize its brands to local tastes. For example, Campbell's cream of pumpkin was Australia's top-selling canned soup in 1996, while Hong Kong's favorite was watercress and duck gizzard soup.

1997

In September 1997, the company announced a plan to spin off seven non-core businesses, including Swanson frozen foods, Vlasic pickles, Swift Armour meats, and other international specialty foods businesses.

Also in 1997 Arnotts acquired the Sydney, Australia-based Kettle Chip Company.

When a smiling face was added to the original goldfish in 1997, "Smiley" the Goldfish icon was born.

The company's Pepperidge Farm and Godiva brands were solid contributors to company performance, both experiencing double-digit growth in 1997.

The company attributed the drop to "special charges" the company recorded in the first quarter of 1997—before the charge, net earnings increased 9 percent and earnings per share increased 15 percent.

In early 1997, several market analysts were enthusiastic about Campbell Soup Company's financial performance and its management.

Campbell's soups and sauces accounted for $4.1 billion in sales in 1997, most of which came from three varieties—tomato, chicken noodle, and cream of mushroom.

The spin-off would provide significant cost reductions for Campbell and allow the company to focus on businesses with the highest growth potential—soup and sauces, biscuits and confectionery, and foodservice—all of which grew 10 percent in sales and 15 percent in earnings during 1997.

In 1997, new products such as V8 Splash and Franco-American Superiore all-family pastas contributed to the company's sales growth.

In 1997, international volume and market share gains were achieved in all countries, with exceptional growth realized in Australia, Canada, and Japan.

1998

The company's largest campaign in its history, "M'm! M'm! Good For The Body, Good For The Soul" was launched in February 1998 and focused on the "nurturing and nourishing" qualities of Campbell's soup.

"campbell launches new soup campaign: m'm! m'm! good for the body, good for the soul." campbell soup company press release, 9 february 1998.

The Vlasic spin-off was completed March 30, 1998, creating a new $1.4-billion company called Vlasic Foods International.

lee, jeanne. "comfort stocks." fortune investor, 2 march 1998.

The 1998 dealmaking was not quite over, however, as Campbell sold Delacre, its European biscuit business, to United Biscuit (Holdings) PLC for $125 million in cash in June—leaving Pepperidge Farm and Arnotts as its mainstays in biscuits and crackers.

Hays, Constance L., "Will Goldfish Tactics Help Campbell's Soups?," New York Times, October 18, 1998, sec.

Hays, Constance L., “Will Goldfish Tactics Help Campbell’s Soups?,” New York Times, October 18, 1998, sec.

The latter, however, was sold in 1998.

Saatchi & Saatchi created the accompanying tagline, "The snack that smiles back." In 1998, following a consolidation by the brand's parent company, Campbell Soup, Young & Rubicam Advertising in New York won the Goldfish account.

Nabisco, which claimed one of the top spots in the snack-cracker market with its Ritz brand, went one step too far in its competition with Pepperidge Farm when it introduced its own fish-shaped crackers in 1998.

Launched in 1998, the Progresso campaign was called "Discover the Better Taste of Progresso," and it targeted women aged 25 to 54.

Fortune also reported the health of the "comfort-food" industry as a whole in early 1998.

1999

In July 1999, meantime, Johnson retired from his remaining position as chairman.

The latter, however, was sold in 1999.

2000

Simon, Ellen. "Nabisco, Pepperidge Farm Battle over Cheese-Cracker Rights." Knight Ridder/Tribune Business News, January 19, 2000.

In 2000 a federal court upheld Pepperidge Farm's claim and ordered Nabisco to discontinue production of its fish-shaped cracker.

Later in 2000 Kraft Foods acquired the Nabisco brand for $18.9 billion.

Campbell's goal for the year 2000 was to derive 25 percent of its sales from products introduced in the last five years.

2001

In January 2001 Douglas R. Conant was brought onboard as the new president and CEO. A 25-year food industry veteran, Conant had experience at three of the largest food companies in the world: General Mills, Inc., the Kraft Foods unit of Philip Morris Companies Inc., and Nabisco Holdings Corp.

In a deal completed in May 2001, Campbell paid Unilever about $900 million for several dry soup and bouillon brands in Europe, including Oxo, Batchelors, Heisse Tasse, Bla° Band, and Royco.

In July 2001 Conant launched a three-year "transformation plan" to revitalize the ailing company.

2002

―――――――. "Campbell Flagship Suffers Sales Slide." Advertising Age, September 16, 2002.

In 2002 Campbell strengthened its position in the Australia snack food market by acquiring Snack Foods Limited, that country's number two maker of salty snacks.

Long pitched to stay-at-home moms via wholesome TV imagery, the brand in late 2002 targeted college students with wry outdoor ads in select cities—Boston, Philadelphia, and Cincinnati—as a means of testing the core brand's ability to grow market share outside its traditional audience.

In 2002 Campbell launched a new product line, Soup at Hand, America's first "sippable" soup, which was packaged in a microwaveable container designed to fit in a person's hand for on-the-go consumption.

2003

Thompson, Stephanie. "Campbell Bets $100 Million on Edgy Ad Effort." Advertising Age, August 4, 2003.

The first cans of kosher condensed Vegetarian Vegetable Soup hit the market in late 2003.

BrightHouseLive had opened its doors in 2003 but had quickly earned a reputation for devising unusual advertising campaigns.

In early 2003, prior to the "Make It Campbell's Instead" campaign, Campbell unveiled a marketing, packaging, and promotions platform uniting its portable lines of soups.

2004

McMains, Andrew. "Pepperidge Farm Adds BrightHouse on Goldfish." Adweek, November 24, 2004.

Lee, Richard. "Norwalk, Conn.-Based Pepperidge Farm Places Goldfish in 'Kranks' Movie." Stamford (CT) Advocate, December 18, 2004.

Malovany, Dan. "Snack Attack: Many Cracker Manufacturers Are Adding New Products, Promotions and Marketing Programs that Not-Too-Subtly Resembles the Successful Strategies Used by Traditional Salted Snack Producers." Snack Food & Wholesale Bakery, December 1, 2004.

Among other developments in 2004, Campbell dropped the Franco-American name from its SpaghettiOs line of canned pasta products in favor of the Campbell's name in an attempt to leverage the strength of the flagship brand.

But despite its ranking the Goldfish brand was slipping; in 2004 sales of the crackers dipped 8.3 percent from the previous year.

At the request of Pepperidge Farm, Atlanta-based BrightHouseLive joined the team in 2004.

While Nabisco's Ritz cracker brand claimed the number one spot in the snack-cracker market at the end of 2004, with $232.6 million in annual United States sales, the company was still looking for a niche in the shaped-cracker market.

The new product launch was supported by a marketing campaign created by Leo Burnett/Chicago and continued the brand's tagline, "Get your own box." With $140.1 million in sales, the Cheez-It cracker brand ranked fourth in the snack-cracker market at the end of 2004.

Targeting an older audience, in 2004 Kellogg introduced Twisterz, another variation on its Cheez-It crackers.

The "Make It Campbell's Instead" concept remained in place through 2004, and the company put particular emphasis on extending the appeals to children, preteens, and teens that had first been tested in the Elliott-helmed commercials.

2005

The campaign, which began in January 2005, also included in-store and online marketing and new packaging for the Goldfish crackers.

The initial two 30-second spots, which were first aired in January 2005, highlighted Goldfish crackers' cheddar-flavored variety.

Janoff, Barry. "Pepperidge Farm Floats Fish Story." Adweek, January 18, 2005.

Lovel, Jim. "BHL Brings Goldfish Snack to Animated Life." Adweek, January 7, 2005.

"Pepperidge Farm Hooks Animated Star." Brandweek, January 10, 2005.

"Alien Invaders Attack with a Vengeance." Snack Food & Wholesale Bakery, June 1, 2005.

Additionally the Campbell Soup Company credited the campaign and its spokescharacter with boosting Pepperidge Farm's sales in 2005.

In 2005 the Kellogg Company introduced its own character-shaped cracker under its Keebler Sunshine cracker brand, Cheez-It.

2006

In 2006 Premier Foods, the United Kingdom’s largest food producer, purchased Campbell Soup’s subsidiaries in both the United Kingdom and Ireland.

2008

In the UK and Ireland, Campbell Soup was rebranded as Batchelors Condensed Soup (UK) and Erin (Ireland) in March 2008, when the license to use the brand name expired.

In 2008 Campbell entered a licensing agreement with Wolfgang Puck Worldwide, Inc., that allowed the company to sell Wolfgang Puck soup, stock, and broth products, thereby expanding Campbell’s organic soup offerings.

In 2008 the company pledged $10 million to the city of Camden’s Public Benefit Plan for community improvement.

2009

In 2009, Campbell’s completed the building of a new and expanded headquarters in the city.

In 2009, Campbell's completed the building of a new and expanded headquarters in the city.

2012

In 2012, Campbell announced plans to buy Bolthouse Farms, a maker of juices, salad dressings and baby carrots, for $1.55 billion.

2013

In June 2013, Campbell acquired the Danish multinational baked goods company Kelsen Group for an undisclosed amount.

2015

In June 2015, Campbell Soup acquired salsa maker Garden Fresh Gourmet for $231 million as it looked to expand into the fresh and organic packaged foods business.

2018

The company announced in January 2018 that their only Canadian factory, in Toronto, would close.

2020

In 2020 Late July snacks debuted its first-ever national advertising campaign.

net sales in fiscal 2020.

2021

"Campbell Soup Company ." International Directory of Company Histories. . Retrieved April 15, 2021 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/books/politics-and-business-magazines/campbell-soup-company-2

"Campbell Soup Company ." International Directory of Company Histories. . Encyclopedia.com. (April 15, 2021). https://www.encyclopedia.com/books/politics-and-business-magazines/campbell-soup-company-1

"Campbell Soup Company ." International Directory of Company Histories. . Retrieved April 15, 2021 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/books/politics-and-business-magazines/campbell-soup-company-1

Gasbarre, April; Salamie, David "Campbell Soup Company ." International Directory of Company Histories. . Retrieved April 15, 2021 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/books/politics-and-business-magazines/campbell-soup-company-0

Gasbarre, April; Salamie, David "Campbell Soup Company ." International Directory of Company Histories. . Encyclopedia.com. (April 15, 2021). https://www.encyclopedia.com/books/politics-and-business-magazines/campbell-soup-company

Gasbarre, April; Salamie, David "Campbell Soup Company ." International Directory of Company Histories. . Retrieved April 15, 2021 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/books/politics-and-business-magazines/campbell-soup-company

Founded
1869
Company Founded
Headquarters
Camden, NJ
Company Headquarter
Founders
Joseph Campbell
Company Founders

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