FIND PERSONALIZED JOBS
Sign up to Zippia and discover your career options with your personalized career search.

Log In

Log In to Save

Sign Up to Save

Sign Up to Dismiss

or

The email and password you specified are invalid. Please, try again.

Email and password are mandatory

Forgot Password?

Don't have an account? Sign Up

reset password

Enter your email address and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Back to Log In

FIND
PERSONALIZED JOBS

Become A Career Analyst

Where do you want to work?

To get started, tell us where you'd like to work.
Sorry, we can't find that. Please try a different city or state.

Working As A Career Analyst

  • Analyzing Data or Information
  • Getting Information
  • Processing Information
  • Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events
  • Thinking Creatively
  • Mostly Sitting

  • Make Decisions

  • $81,320

    Average Salary

What Does A Career Analyst Do

Sociologists study society and social behavior by examining the groups, cultures, organizations, social institutions, and processes that develop when people interact and work together.

Duties

Sociologists typically do the following:

  • Design research projects to test theories about social issues
  • Collect data through surveys, observations, interviews, and other sources
  • Analyze and draw conclusions from data
  • Prepare reports, articles, or presentations detailing their research findings
  • Collaborate with and advise other social scientists, policymakers, or other groups on research findings and sociological issues

Sociologists study human behavior, interaction, and organization within the context of larger social, political, and economic forces. They observe the activity of social, religious, political, and economic groups, organizations, and institutions. They examine the effect of social influences, including organizations and institutions, on different individuals and groups. They also trace the origin and growth of these groups and interactions. For example, they may research the impact of a new law or policy on a specific demographic.

Sociologists often use both quantitative and qualitative methods when conducting research, and they frequently use statistical analysis programs during the research process. 

Administrators, educators, lawmakers, and social workers use sociological research to solve social problems and formulate public policy. Sociologists specialize in a wide range of social topics, including the following:

  • Health
  • Crime
  • Education
  • Racial and ethnic relations
  • Families
  • Population
  • Gender
  • Poverty
  • Aging

Sociologists who specialize in crime may be called criminologists or penologists. These workers apply their sociological knowledge to conduct research and analyze penal systems and populations and to study the causes and effects of crime.

Many people with a sociology background become postsecondary teachers and high school teachers. Most others, particularly those with a bachelor’s degree in sociology, often find work in related jobs outside the sociologist profession as policy analysts, demographers, survey researchers, and statisticians. 

Show More

Show Less

How To Become A Career Analyst

Most sociology jobs require a master’s degree or Ph.D. Many bachelor’s degreeholders find positions in related fields, such as social services, education, or public policy.

Education

Sociologists typically need a master’s degree or Ph.D. There are two types of sociology master’s degree programs: traditional programs and applied, clinical, and professional programs. Traditional programs prepare students to enter a Ph.D. program. Applied, clinical, and professional programs prepare students to enter the workplace, teaching them the necessary analytical skills to perform sociological research in a professional setting.

Many students who complete a Ph.D. in sociology become postsecondary teachers. Other Ph.D. graduates often become research sociologists for nonprofits, businesses, and governments.

Courses in research methods and statistics are important for both master’s and Ph.D. candidates. Many programs also offer opportunities to gain experience through internships or by preparing reports for clients.

Although some graduates with a bachelor’s degree find work as sociology research assistants, most find positions in other fields. Sociology is a broad field of study with diverse application. Graduates with a bachelor’s degree in sociology are often able to apply their knowledge to many different industries, including social services, human resources, and government.

Other Experience

Candidates with a bachelor’s degree may benefit from internships or volunteer work when looking for entry-level positions in sociology or a related field. These types of opportunities give students a chance to apply their academic knowledge in a professional setting and develop skills needed for the field.

Important Qualities

Analytical skills. Sociologists must be able to carefully analyze data and other information, often using statistical methods to test their theories.

Communication skills. Sociologists need strong communication skills when they conduct interviews, collaborate with colleagues, and present research results.

Critical-thinking skills. Sociologists must be able to think critically when doing research. They must design research projects and collect, process, and analyze information to draw logical conclusions about society and about various groups of people.

Writing skills. Sociologists frequently write reports detailing their findings.

Show More

Show Less

Career Analyst jobs

NO RESULTS

Aw snap, no jobs found.

Add To My Jobs

Career Analyst Demographics

Gender

Female

63.1%

Male

34.9%

Unknown

2.0%
Ethnicity

White

80.3%

Hispanic or Latino

9.3%

Asian

7.4%

Unknown

2.1%

Black or African American

1.0%
Show More
Languages Spoken

Spanish

36.4%

French

12.1%

Hindi

9.1%

Arabic

9.1%

Portuguese

6.1%

Urdu

6.1%

Filipino

3.0%

German

3.0%

Japanese

3.0%

Norwegian

3.0%

Persian

3.0%

Tagalog

3.0%

Italian

3.0%
Show More

Career Analyst Education

Schools

University of Phoenix

20.9%

Strayer University

7.7%

Webster University

5.5%

University of North Carolina at Charlotte

5.5%

Auburn University

5.5%

Boston University

4.4%

University of New Haven

4.4%

Kennesaw State University

4.4%

George Washington University

4.4%

Ashford University

4.4%

University of Florida

3.3%

Bemidji State University

3.3%

Drexel University

3.3%

Georgetown University

3.3%

Central Michigan University

3.3%

Pennsylvania State University

3.3%

Saint Louis University-

3.3%

University of Southern Indiana

3.3%

Georgia State University

3.3%

University of Houston

3.3%
Show More
Majors

Business

32.8%

Health Care Administration

11.6%

Nursing

6.3%

Finance

6.1%

Management

4.5%

Accounting

4.5%

Computer Science

4.0%

Psychology

4.0%

Public Health

3.3%

Computer Information Systems

2.8%

Biology

2.5%

Criminal Justice

2.5%

Information Technology

2.3%

Marketing

2.3%

Economics

2.0%

Computer Networking

2.0%

English

1.8%

General Studies

1.5%

Social Work

1.5%

Communication

1.5%
Show More
Degrees

Bachelors

35.4%

Masters

29.6%

Other

15.4%

Associate

10.2%

Certificate

4.0%

Diploma

2.5%

Doctorate

2.5%

License

0.4%
Show More
Job type you want
Full Time
Part Time
Internship
Temporary

Real Career Analyst Salaries

Job Title Company Location Start Date Salary
Energy Storage Career Analyst (Economist) Pacific Gas and Electric Company San Francisco, CA Sep 21, 2015 $85,000
Analyst/Programmer-Career California State University Fullerton Fullerton, CA Jan 14, 2013 $66,996
Analyst/Programmer-Career California State University Fullerton Fullerton, CA Feb 04, 2013 $66,996
Analyst/Programmer-Career California State University, Sacramento Sacramento, CA Dec 15, 2016 $65,292

No Results

To get more results, try adjusting your search by changing your filters.

Show More

Top Skills for A Career Analyst

CustomerServiceDataEntryMedicalRecordsMedicaidCustomerCareHealthSystemCompanyPoliciesAnalyticalSupportSQLAuditInsuranceCompaniesFeeSchedulesHealthPlanWebCareContractsTechnicalSupportSASHedisDataAnalysisCustomerIssues

Show More

Top Career Analyst Skills

  1. Customer Service
  2. Data Entry
  3. Medical Records
You can check out examples of real life uses of top skills on resumes here:
  • Handled internal/external participant reference to Medicare D. Educated and provided excellent customer service for prescription/ and or benefit needs.
  • Trained individuals for data entry.
  • Review managed care contracts against health care claims for possible underpayments and reviewed medical records.
  • Performed chart analysis on Medicare and Medicaid records.
  • Awarded Customer Care Superstar on three occasions and elected twice by peers as Best Team Player.

Top Career Analyst Employers