Case managers focus on guiding clients in helping their needs, resolving problems, and provide support through coursing them to relevant welfare organizations and agencies. It is the case manager's job to create case studies on subjects, in this case, children, for a social worker to provide an assessment. In many situations, the case manager is a licensed social worker who focuses on providing help for children in need. A case manager is mostly seen in government agencies and welfare organizations, hospitals, and healthcare facilities.

Case Manager For Children Responsibilities

Here are examples of responsibilities from real case manager for children resumes representing typical tasks they are likely to perform in their roles.

  • Manage and prioritize individual crisis accessing DMP, law enforcement, and psychiatric hospitalization while meeting daily, weekly/biweekly caseload requirements.
  • Manage and prioritize individual crisis accessing DMP, law enforcement, and psychiatric hospitalization while meeting daily, weekly/biweekly caseload requirements.
  • School advocacy; support child and family in understanding and obtaining IEP or 504 plans.
  • Attend IEP meetings, conduct home visits, monitor court involvement, prepare clinical documentation associate with treatment.
  • Ensure accurate and timely staff documentation and appropriate communication of services provide and incidents that occur within the unit.
  • Coordinate services for children; facilitate and monitor communication and progress between families and service providers; crisis/disaster response team.
  • Communicate with AOT personnel, family conferences, and maintain on-call availability
Case Manager For Children Traits
Communication skills shows that you are able to relay your thoughts, opinions and ideas clearly to those around you.
Compassion is a skill that is necessary for working with others as you're able to put aside your differences and show genuine kindness toward others.
Interpersonal skills involves being able to communicate efficiently with multiple people regarding your thoughts, ideas and feedback.

Case Manager For Children Job Description

When it comes to understanding what a case manager for children does, you may be wondering, "should I become a case manager for children?" The data included in this section may help you decide. Compared to other jobs, case managers for children have a growth rate described as "much faster than average" at 13% between the years 2018 - 2028, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. In fact, the number of case manager for children opportunities that are predicted to open up by 2028 is 52,200.

A case manager for children annual salary averages $34,964, which breaks down to $16.81 an hour. However, case managers for children can earn anywhere from upwards of $29,000 to $42,000 a year. This means that the top-earning case managers for children make $13,000 more than the lowest-earning ones.

As is the case with most jobs, it takes work to become a case manager for children. Sometimes people change their minds about their career after working in the profession. That's why we looked into some other professions that might help you find your next opportunity. These professions include a volunteer, program coordinator, resident assistant, and coordinator.

Case Manager For Children Jobs You Might Like

Case Manager For Children Resume Examples

Case Manager For Children Skills and Personality Traits

We calculated that 16% of Case Managers For Children are proficient in Child Abuse, Mental Health, and Management Services. They’re also known for soft skills such as Communication skills, Compassion, and Interpersonal skills.

We break down the percentage of Case Managers For Children that have these skills listed on their resume here:

  • Child Abuse, 16%

    Provide comprehensive case management services to parents and caregivers involved in circuit court proceedings regarding sustained child abuse and neglect.

  • Mental Health, 11%

    Promoted mental health service, providing or facilitating prevention and intervention presentations to schools and other community agencies.

  • Management Services, 7%

    Provided intensive one-on-one case management services to non-custodial parent in job placement.

  • Treatment Plans, 7%

    Maintain detailed case files including history, treatment plans and recommendations while maintaining client confidentiality.

  • Crisis Intervention, 6%

    Allow culturally sensitive, strength based, and family centered practice with community and kinship collaboration as crisis intervention.

  • Social Workers, 5%

    Facilitated communication between volunteers and caregivers, providers, social workers and program attorneys.

"child abuse," "mental health," and "management services" aren't the only skills we found case managers for children list on their resumes. In fact, there's a whole list of case manager for children responsibilities that we found, including:

  • The most important skills for a case manager for children to have in this position are communication skills. In this excerpt that we gathered from a case manager for children resume, you'll understand why: "social and human service assistants talk with clients about the challenges in their lives and assist them in getting help" According to resumes we found, communication skills can be used by a case manager for children in order to "maintained effective communication with district attorney's, therapist, and law enforcement. "
  • Another trait important for fulfilling case manager for children duties is compassion. According to a case manager for children resume, "social and human service assistants often work with people who are in stressful and difficult situations." Here's an example of how case managers for children are able to utilize compassion: "provide counseling, compassion, and create treatment plans to assist clients in recovery. "
  • Interpersonal skills is also an important skill for case managers for children to have. This example of how case managers for children use this skill comes from a case manager for children resume, "social and human service assistants must make their clients feel comfortable discussing sensitive issues" Read this excerpt from a resume to understand how vital it is to their everyday roles and responsibilities, "facilitated anger management and interpersonal skills group therapy sessions for male and female children and adolescents. "
  • In order for certain case manager for children responsibilities to be completed, the job requires the skill "organizational skills." According to a case manager for children resume, "social and human service assistants must often complete lots of paperwork and work with many different clients" As an example, this snippet was taken directly from a resume about how this skill applies: "supervised financial recording keeping and preparation for organizational records developed substance abuse program including mentoring for clients. "
  • Yet another important skill that a case manager for children must demonstrate is "problem-solving skills." Social and human service assistants help clients find solutions to their problems This is clearly demonstrated in this example from a case manager for children who stated: "provide crisis intervention and conflict resolution individually and in group setting. "
  • Another skill commonly found on case manager for children resumes is "time-management skills." This description of the skill was found on several case manager for children resumes: "social and human service assistants often work with many clients" Here's an example from a resume of how this skill could fit into the day-to-day case manager for children responsibilities: "managed a caseload of 95 clients by completing an extensive application process and ensuring deadlines were met on time. "
  • See the full list of case manager for children skills.

    Before becoming a case manager for children, 73.3% earned their bachelor's degree. When it comes down to graduating with a master's degree, 14.2% case managers for children went for the extra education. If you're wanting to pursue this career, it may be possible to be successful with a high school degree. In fact, most case managers for children have a college degree. But about one out of every nine case managers for children didn't attend college at all.

    The case managers for children who went onto college to earn a more in-depth education generally studied psychology and social work, while a small population of case managers for children studied criminal justice and sociology.

    Once you're ready to become a case manager for children, you should explore the companies that typically hire case managers for children. According to case manager for children resumes that we searched through, case managers for children are hired the most by Anthem, Lakeview Center, and Devereux Foundation. Currently, Anthem has 18 case manager for children job openings, while there are 9 at Lakeview Center and 6 at Devereux Foundation.

    If you're interested in companies where case managers for children make the most money, you'll want to apply for positions at TASC (Total Administrative Services, ProMedica, and Phoenix Children's Hospital. We found that at TASC (Total Administrative Services, the average case manager for children salary is $64,071. Whereas at ProMedica, case managers for children earn roughly $54,406. And at Phoenix Children's Hospital, they make an average salary of $52,802.

    View more details on case manager for children salaries across the United States.

    The industries that case managers for children fulfill the most roles in are the health care and non profits industries. But the highest case manager for children annual salary is in the internet industry, averaging $47,902. In the hospitality industry they make $41,512 and average about $38,391 in the health care industry. In conclusion, case managers for children who work in the internet industry earn a 36.5% higher salary than case managers for children in the government industry.

    The three companies that hire the most prestigious case manager for childrens are:

      What Volunteers Do

      Volunteers are usually unpaid individuals who render their service to a company or organization. Most of the time, volunteers are skilled in specific areas needed by the organization but prefer to provide free service. They may be employed in another organization, but they lend their time and talent to another organization or company to give back to the community. They raise funds, create awareness, and work on the ground. Volunteers usually choose a cause or advocacy close to their heart, such as teaching children, taking care of the elderly, coaching sports teams, cleaning up communities, and caring for animals.

      We looked at the average case manager for children annual salary and compared it with the average of a volunteer. Generally speaking, volunteers receive $6,264 lower pay than case managers for children per year.

      While the salaries between these two careers can be different, they do share some of the same responsibilities. Employees in both case managers for children and volunteers positions are skilled in child care, cpr, and community services.

      There are some key differences in responsibilities as well. For example, a case manager for children responsibilities require skills like "child abuse," "mental health," "management services," and "treatment plans." Meanwhile a typical volunteer has skills in areas such as "emergency," "safe environment," "front office," and "community outreach." This difference in skills reveals how truly different these two careers really are.

      On average, volunteers reach lower levels of education than case managers for children. Volunteers are 28.4% less likely to earn a Master's Degree and 1.1% more likely to graduate with a Doctoral Degree.

      What Are The Duties Of a Program Coordinator?

      Program coordinators are mid-level employees who are assigned to work on a program of a specific department. They handle the communications between their department and any other department that they may need to collaborate with. They coordinate action plans and activities to ensure that the departments are aligned. They are present during the planning stage for the program so that they will be familiar with action items. They are directly involved in the implementation by liaising with the involved departments. Program coordinators should have good communication skills, interpersonal skills, and organization skills.

      The next role we're going to look at is the program coordinator profession. Typically, this position earns a higher pay. In fact, they earn a $2,257 higher salary than case managers for children per year.

      Not everything about these jobs is different. Take their skills, for example. Case managers for children and program coordinators both include similar skills like "mental health," "treatment plans," and "crisis intervention" on their resumes.

      While some skills are similar in these professions, other skills aren't so similar. For example, several resumes showed us that case manager for children responsibilities requires skills like "child abuse," "management services," "physical health," and "court proceedings." But a program coordinator might use skills, such as, "procedures," "customer service," "professional development," and "powerpoint."

      On average, program coordinators earn a higher salary than case managers for children. There are industries that support higher salaries in each profession respectively. Interestingly enough, program coordinators earn the most pay in the education industry with an average salary of $43,002. Whereas, case managers for children have higher paychecks in the internet industry where they earn an average of $47,902.

      When it comes to the differences in education between the two professions, program coordinators tend to reach similar levels of education than case managers for children. In fact, they're 4.7% less likely to graduate with a Master's Degree and 1.1% more likely to earn a Doctoral Degree.

      How a Resident Assistant Compares

      Resident assistants help manage peers or younger students who live in a particular residence hall on campus. They are usually in charge of welcoming fellow students, providing residence hall tours, and helping students cope with their new environment. To help students become more at ease with their environment, resident assistants usually act as buddies. They answer inquiries that the students may have and act as the bridge between the students and the residence hall management. They assist with administrative activities in the residence hall, such as handing out forms for students and ensuring documents are correctly filled out.

      Let's now take a look at the resident assistant profession. On average, these workers make lower salaries than case managers for children with a $16,022 difference per year.

      While looking through the resumes of several case managers for children and resident assistants we discovered that both professions have similar skills. These similarities include skills such as "crisis intervention," "cpr," and "community services," but they differ when it comes to other required skills.

      Some important key differences between the two careers are a few of the skills necessary to fulfill responsibilities. Some examples from case manager for children resumes include skills like "child abuse," "mental health," "management services," and "treatment plans," whereas a resident assistant might be skilled in "personal care," "cna," "vital signs," and "residential life. "

      Interestingly enough, resident assistants earn the most pay in the education industry, where they command an average salary of $26,092. As mentioned previously, case managers for children highest annual salary comes from the internet industry with an average salary of $47,902.

      When it comes to education, resident assistants tend to earn lower education levels than case managers for children. In fact, they're 34.0% less likely to earn a Master's Degree, and 0.5% less likely to graduate with a Doctoral Degree.

      Description Of a Coordinator

      Coordinators are responsible for liaising between the department they are assigned to and any other external party. They oversee projects or agreements. They are in charge of following through negotiations between the two parties regarding work. They see through the conduct of such contracts by ensuring that all terms are amenable to both parties. They maintain records and other necessary data and paperwork. They also ensure that office policy and guidelines are being followed. Coordinators also ensure that all projects are completed efficiently and effectively.

      The fourth career we look at typically earns higher pay than case managers for children. On average, coordinators earn a difference of $6,173 higher per year.

      While both case managers for children and coordinators complete day-to-day tasks using similar skills like treatment plans, community resources, and cpr, the two careers also vary in other skills.

      While some skills are shared by these professions, there are some differences to note. "child abuse," "mental health," "management services," and "crisis intervention" are skills that have shown up on case managers for children resumes. Additionally, coordinator uses skills like procedures, customer service, data entry, and coordinators on their resumes.

      Now, let's take a closer look at the financials in each career. The manufacturing industry tends to pay more for coordinators with an average of $63,536. While the highest case manager for children annual salary comes from the internet industry.

      The average resume of coordinators showed that they earn lower levels of education to case managers for children. So much so that the likelihood of them earning a Master's Degree is 19.8% less. Additionally, they're more likely to earn a Doctoral Degree by 1.2%.