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Become A Cashier/Shift Manager

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Working As A Cashier/Shift Manager

  • Making Decisions and Solving Problems
  • Training and Teaching Others
  • Getting Information
  • Performing for or Working Directly with the Public
  • Guiding, Directing, and Motivating Subordinates
  • Unpleasant/Angry People

  • Repetitive

  • $36,000

    Average Salary

What Does A Cashier/Shift Manager Do

Food service managers are responsible for the daily operation of restaurants and other establishments that prepare and serve food and beverages. They direct staff to ensure that customers are satisfied with their dining experience, and they manage the business to ensure that it is profitable. 

Duties

Food service managers typically do the following:

  • Hire, train, oversee, and sometimes fire employees
  • Order food and beverages, equipment, and supplies
  • Oversee food preparation, portion sizes, and the overall presentation of food
  • Inspect supplies, equipment, and work areas
  • Ensure that employees comply with health and food safety standards
  • Address complaints regarding food quality or service
  • Schedule staff hours and assign duties
  • Manage budgets and payroll records
  • Establish standards for personnel performance and customer service

Managers coordinate activities of the kitchen and dining room staff to ensure that customers are served properly and in a timely manner. They oversee orders in the kitchen, and, if needed, they work with the chef to remedy any delays in service.

Food service managers are responsible for all functions of the business related to employees. For example, most managers interview, hire, train, oversee, appraise, discipline, and sometimes fire employees. Managers also schedule work hours, making sure that enough workers are present to cover each shift. During busy periods, they may expedite service by helping to serve customers, processing payments, or cleaning tables.

Managers also arrange for cleaning and maintenance services for the equipment and facility in order to comply with health and sanitary regulations. For example, they may arrange for trash removal, pest control, and heavy cleaning when the dining room and kitchen are not in use.

Most managers perform a variety of administrative tasks, such as managing employee records and preparing the payroll. They also may review or complete paperwork related to licensing, taxes and wages, and unemployment compensation. Although they sometimes assign these tasks to an assistant manager or bookkeeper, most managers are responsible for the accuracy of business records.

Some managers add up the cash and charge slips and secure them in a safe place. They also may check that ovens, grills, and other equipment are properly cleaned and secured, and that the establishment is locked at the close of business.

Those who manage their own business often deal with suppliers and arrange for the delivery of food and beverages and other supplies.

Full-service restaurants (those with table service) may have a management team that includes a general manager, one or more assistant managers, and an executive chef.

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How To Become A Cashier/Shift Manager

Most applicants qualify with a high school diploma and several years of work experience in the food service industry as a cook, waiter or waitress, or counter attendant. Some applicants have received additional training at a community college, technical or vocational school, culinary school, or 4-year college.

Education

Although a bachelor’s degree is not required, some postsecondary education is increasingly preferred for many manager positions, especially at upscale restaurants and hotels. Some food service companies, hotels, and restaurant chains recruit management trainees from college hospitality or food service management programs. These programs may require the participants to work in internships and to have real-life food industry-related experiences in order to graduate.

Many colleges and universities offer bachelor’s degree programs in restaurant and hospitality management or institutional food service management. In addition, numerous community colleges, technical institutes, and other institutions offer programs in the field that lead to an associate’s degree. Some culinary schools offer programs in restaurant management with courses designed for those who want to start and run their own restaurant.

Most programs provide instruction in nutrition, sanitation, and food preparation, as well as courses in accounting, business law, and management. Some programs combine classroom and practical study with internships.

Work Experience in a Related Occupation

Most food service managers start working in industry-related jobs, such as cooks, waiters and waitresses, or hosts and hostesses. They often spend years working under the direction of an experienced worker, learning the necessary skills before they are promoted to manager positions.

Training

Managers who work for restaurant chains and food service management companies may be required to complete programs that combine classroom instruction and on-the-job training. Topics may include food preparation, sanitation, security, company policies, personnel management, and recordkeeping.

Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations

Although certification is not required, managers may obtain the Food Protection Managers Certification (FPMC) by passing a food safety exam. The American National Standards Institute accredits institutions that offer the FPMC.

In addition, the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation awards the Foodservice Management Professional (FMP) designation, a voluntary certification to managers who meet the following criteria:

  • Have supervisory experience in food service
  • Have specialized training in food safety
  • Pass a multiple-choice exam

The certification attests to professional competence, particularly for managers who learned their skills on the job.

Important Qualities

Business skills. Food service managers, especially those who run their own restaurant, must understand all aspects of the restaurant business. They should know how to budget for supplies, set prices, and manage workers to ensure that the restaurant is profitable.

Communication skills. Food service managers must give clear orders to staff and be able to communicate effectively with employees and customers.

Customer-service skills. Food service managers must be courteous and attentive when dealing with patrons. Satisfying customers’ dining needs is critical to business success and ensures customer loyalty.

Detail oriented. Managers deal with many different types of activities. They ensure that there is enough food to serve to customers, they maintain financial records, and they ensure that the food meets health and safety standards.

Leadership skills. Managers must establish good working relationships to maintain a productive work environment. Carrying out this task may involve motivating workers and leading by example.

Organizational skills. Food service managers keep track of many different schedules, budgets, and staff. Their job becomes more complex as the size of the restaurant or food service facility increases.

Physical stamina. Managers, especially those who run their own restaurant, often work long shifts and sometimes spend entire evenings on their feet helping to serve customers.

Problem-solving skills. Managers need to be able to resolve personnel issues and customer-related problems.

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Average Length of Employment
Swing Manager 3.5 years
Crew Manager 3.1 years
Shift Supervisor 3.1 years
Cashier Manager 3.1 years
Cashier Supervisor 2.9 years
Shift Manager 2.8 years
Shift Lead Manager 2.5 years
Shift Leader 2.3 years
Lead Cashier 2.2 years
Lead Crew Member 2.2 years
Cashier/Dishwasher 1.4 years
Top Careers Before Cashier/Shift Manager
Cashier 33.1%
Server 4.0%
Waitress 3.3%
Manager 2.5%
Internship 2.4%
Cook 2.2%
Volunteer 2.1%
Top Careers After Cashier/Shift Manager
Cashier 24.7%
Server 4.6%
Manager 3.6%
Cook 2.4%
Waitress 2.2%

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Top Skills for A Cashier/Shift Manager

  1. Customer Service
  2. Food Preparation
  3. Customer Complaints
You can check out examples of real life uses of top skills on resumes here:
  • Explained and displayed excellence in customer service, while maintaining company standards in product and facility specifications.
  • Ensured that federal regulations regarding cleanliness and food preparation were met.
  • Processed and addressed customer complaints, examined returned merchandise, and performed conflict resolution.
  • Handle all money transactions bank deposits scheduling inventory place product orders
  • Received Customer Orders and ensured Proper Presentation and delivery.

Cashier/Shift Manager Resume Examples And Tips

The average resume reviewer spends between 5 to 7 seconds looking at a single resume, which leaves the average job applier with roughly six seconds to make a killer first impression. Thanks to this, a single typo or error on your resume can disqualify you right out of the gate. At Zippia, we went through over 6,133 Cashier/Shift Manager resumes and compiled some information about how best to optimize them. Here are some suggestions based on what we found, divided by the individual sections of the resume itself.

Learn How To Create A Top Notch Cashier/Shift Manager Resume

View Resume Examples

Cashier/Shift Manager Demographics

Gender

Female

59.5%

Male

26.8%

Unknown

13.7%
Ethnicity

White

61.6%

Hispanic or Latino

16.2%

Black or African American

12.4%

Asian

6.3%

Unknown

3.5%
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Foreign Languages Spoken

Spanish

74.6%

French

7.2%

German

3.3%

Arabic

2.8%

Hindi

2.2%

Nepali

1.1%

Tagalog

1.1%

Urdu

1.1%

Thai

1.1%

Swahili

0.6%

Portuguese

0.6%

Hawaiian

0.6%

Wolof

0.6%

Dakota

0.6%

Albanian

0.6%

Japanese

0.6%

Italian

0.6%

Korean

0.6%

Russian

0.6%
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Cashier/Shift Manager Education

Schools

University of Phoenix

25.8%

The Academy

7.7%

Kaplan University

6.0%

Everest Institute

5.7%

Ashford University

5.4%

Ultimate Medical Academy - Clearwater

4.7%

Temple University

4.0%

Trident Technical College

3.7%

College of Southern Nevada

3.7%

Liberty University

3.7%

Ivy Tech Community College of Indiana

3.7%

Delgado Community College

3.4%

Houston Community College

3.0%

Savannah Technical College

3.0%

A-Technical College

3.0%

Wake Technical Community College

2.7%

Calhoun Community College

2.7%

Ashworth College

2.7%

T.A. Lawson State Community College

2.7%

Gadsden State Community College

2.7%
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Majors

Business

22.3%

Medical Assisting Services

10.0%

Criminal Justice

8.8%

Nursing

7.7%

Health Care Administration

6.5%

Accounting

6.3%

General Studies

5.9%

Psychology

5.0%

Cosmetology

3.2%

Communication

2.8%

Culinary Arts

2.6%

Education

2.6%

Liberal Arts

2.4%

Computer Science

2.3%

Pharmacy

2.2%

Management

2.2%

Biology

2.0%

Medical Technician

2.0%

Human Services

1.8%

Nursing Assistants

1.7%
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Degrees

Other

40.9%

Bachelors

24.8%

Associate

19.6%

Certificate

6.1%

Diploma

4.6%

Masters

2.7%

License

1.0%

Doctorate

0.2%
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