What Does A Contract Coordinator Do?

Contract Coordinators typically earn $46,149 annually, which breaks down to $22.19 an hour. However, Contract Coordinators can earn anywhere from upwards of $33,000 to $62,000 a year. This means that the top-earning Contract Coordinators make $29,000 more than the lowest-earning ones.

Maybe you're a current Contract Coordinator looking for a new opportunity, or maybe you're entertaining the notion of becoming a Contract Coordinator and want to see how it compares to similar jobs. We've compiled extensive information on becoming a Operations Specialist, Business Developer, Operations Internship, and Operations Associate just so you can compare. But more on how these roles compare to a Contract Coordinator later.

Contract Coordinator Traits
Analytical skills
Analytical skills have to do with gathering information from various sources and then interpreting the data in order to reach a logical conclusion that benefits the business.
Math skills
Math skills include being able to perform basic addition and subtraction, as well as solving for the unknown and visualizing data that will be helpful in the workplace.
Writing skills
Writing skills is important when it comes to clearing expressing yourself in any written document.

Contract Coordinator Job Description

Here are the duties and responsibilities that a Contract Coordinator is likely to perform in their role.

  • Provide administrative support and assistance team leads and other senior agents with troubleshooting tickets or tasks.
  • Manage technical and non-technical vendors to ensure competitive pricing and timely delivery, with proper RFP's and SLA agreements.
  • Process contract files, insurances and logistics.
  • Maintain and edit cost voucher format in accordance with DCAA audit team standards.
  • Perform SOX audits to ensure compliance with state, federal, and company laws and regulations.
  • Require knowledge of all contracting types and vehicles terms and conditions, and FARs & DFARs.
  • Ensure all elements require by RFP and other funding agency requirements are complete, including identification and completion of special forms.
  • Communicate reimbursement adjustments to providers and internal staff to ensure that all require changes are correctly implement within administrative system.
  • Coordinate the corporate-wide data verification process for contract providers and update contracts in the organization's databases, as necessary.
  • Interact extensively with senior executives to meet project deadlines and objectives while ensuring SOX compliance in P2P processes.

Contract Coordinator Skills and Personality Traits

We calculated that 11% of Contract Coordinators are proficient in Data Entry, Vendor Relations, and Purchase Orders. They’re also known for soft skills such as Analytical skills, Math skills, and Writing skills.

We break down the percentage of Contract Coordinators that have these skills listed on their resume here:

  • Data Entry, 11%

    Supervised and reviewed data entry of photography and illustration contracts.

  • Vendor Relations, 8%

    Managed vendor relationships including vendor inquiries and/or complaints.

  • Purchase Orders, 6%

    Review, schedule and process customer proposals and purchase orders accurately and efficiently.

  • Financial Statements, 6%

    Achieved an exceptionally strong financial position with financial statements by implementing systems for purchase requisition approvals, invoice and accrual procedures.

  • Contractual Agreements, 6%

    Initiate implementation process with insurance carrier to form relationship with carrier contact, work simultaneously with Regional Director during negotiations/contractual agreements.

  • Customer Service, 6%

    Worked closely with manufacturing sales, quality control, customer service and traffic departments to maintain integrity between departments.

Data Entry, Vendor Relations, and Purchase Orders aren't the only skills Contract Coordinators have. In fact, there's a whole list of personality traits that are commonly seen among them, including:

In order to accomplish your goal of becoming a Contract Coordinator, we've found that over half, 40.8% to be exact, of Contract Coordinators have a bachelor's degree. The good news is that it doesn't seem like more schooling than that is necessary with only 17.4% having master's degrees. While it's true that most Contract Coordinators have a college degree, it's generally possible to become one with only a high school degree. In fact, one out of every six Contract Coordinators did not spend the extra money to attend college.

Those Contract Coordinators who do attend college, typically earn either Business degrees or Accounting degrees. Less commonly earned degrees for Contract Coordinators include Management degrees or Communication degrees.

Now that you have your degree, you're ready to become a Contract Coordinator. So where do you start applying? According to our research, Contract Coordinators are mostly hired by Varian Medical Systems, Montana, and Centene. Now is a good time to apply as Varian Medical Systems has 4 Contract Coordinators job openings, and there are 3 at Montana and 2 at Centene.

If you're in it for the money, you'll want to apply for positions at ConocoPhillips, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, and PeaceHealth as that's where Contract Coordinators seem to make the most money. Let's take a closer look. At ConocoPhillips, the average Contract Coordinator salary is $86,865. Whereas at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Contract Coordinators earn roughly $73,633. And at PeaceHealth, they make an average salary of $65,257. Before you get too excited over those salary numbers, you should make sure that securing a job at these companies is doable. For example, while ConocoPhillips has 0 job listings for Contract Coordinators, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center and PeaceHealth have 0 and 0 job listings respectively.

The most prestigious Contract Coordinators can be found working at Lockheed Martin, Northrop Grumman, and Boeing. We determine this by assessing the schools where Contract Coordinators have earned their degrees, and then looking at the companies that have hired a significant number of Contract Coordinators from the top 100 educational institutions in the United States.

The industries that Contract Coordinators fulfill the most roles in are the Health Care and Professional industries. But Contract Coordinators make the most amount of money in the Health Care industry, averaging $47,439. In the Technology industry they only make $46,369 and average about $46,325 in the Utilities industry. In conclusion, Contract Coordinators who work in the Health Care industry earn a 10.6% higher salary than Contract Coordinators in the Hospitality industry.

The three companies that hire the most prestigious graphic designers are:

    How a Contract Coordinator Compares to an Operations Specialist

    An Operations Specialist is responsible for managing the flow of a workplace and optimizing day-to-day activities. They track and analyze various reports, such as activity budgets, operation activity, and department metrics for making the necessary improvements.

    Up to bat, or first to compare, is Operations Specialist. Looking at the salary aspect, Operations Specialists earn a $8,756 higher salary than Contract Coordinators annually.

    The two careers find some common ground in the skills department though. Both Contract Coordinators and Operations Specialists alike are skilled in Data Entry, Customer Service, and Special Projects.

    The overlapping skill sets may be the only thing these two roles have in common, as there are some key differences. For example, a Contract Coordinator is more likely to have skills in Vendor Relations, Purchase Orders, Financial Statements, and Contractual Agreements. Meanwhile a typical Operations Specialist has skills in areas such as Operational Procedures, Combat, Radar Systems, and Logistics. This difference in skills reveals how truly different these two careers really are.

    Operations Specialists really shine in the Manufacturing industry with an average salary of $56,686. Whereas Contract Coordinators tend to make the most money in the Health Care industry with an average salary of $47,439. That's quite a big difference in pay.

    On average, Operations Specialists reach similar levels of education than Contract Coordinators. In fact, Operations Specialists are 3.2% less likely to earn a Master's Degree and 2.0% less likely to graduate with a Doctoral Degree.

    How a Contract Coordinator Compares to a Business Developer

    Next up to compare are Business Developers, which typically earn a higher pay of roughly $46,227 higher than Contract Coordinators per year.

    A similarity between the two careers of Contract Coordinators and Business Developers are the skills associated with both roles. The similar skills include Customer Service, RFP, and Real Estate.

    While some skills are similar, others aren't. For example, a Contract Coordinator requires skills like Data Entry, Vendor Relations, Purchase Orders, and Financial Statements. But your average Business Developer will need skills, such as, New Product Development, Strategic Partnerships, New Clients, and Client Relationships. This is where the differences really kick in.

    While we already know that Business Developers earn higher, we took a step further to see what industry these workers typically make the most. Interestingly, Business Developers earn the most pay in the Technology industry with an average salary of $104,844. Whereas, Contract Coordinators have higher paychecks in the Health Care industry where they earn an average of $47,439.

    When it comes to education, Business Developers tend to reach similar levels of education than Contract Coordinators. In fact, they're 4.4% more likely to graduate with a Master's Degree and 2.0% less likely to earn a Doctoral Degree.

    How a Contract Coordinator Compares to an Operations Internship

    Let's now take a look at how Operations Interns compare. On an average scale, these workers bring in lower dough than Contract Coordinators with a lower pay of $15,930 per year.

    Both Contract Coordinators and Operations Interns utilize similar skills, such as Data Entry, Financial Statements, and Customer Service, but beyond that the careers look very different.

    There are actually many key differences between the two careers, including other skills each role requires. As an example of this, a Contract Coordinator is likely to be skilled in Vendor Relations, Purchase Orders, Contractual Agreements, and Providers, while a typical Operations Internship is skilled in Athletic Facilities, Special Events, Ticket Sales, and Front Desk. These skills show how different the two job titles can be within the day-to-day roles and responsibilities.

    For educational purposes, Operations Interns are known for reaching similar levels when compared to Contract Coordinators. In fact, they're 3.1% more likely to graduate with a Master's Degree, and 1.7% more likely to earn a Doctoral Degree.

    How a Contract Coordinator Compares to an Operations Associate

    Now, we'll compare Operations Associates who are known for averaging a higher pay when compared to Contract Coordinators. In fact, the difference is about $23,440 per year.

    While their salaries differ, Contract Coordinators and Operations Associates both use similar skills to perform their jobs like Data Entry, Financial Statements, and Customer Service.

    Even though their skill sets overlap, there are some key differences that are important to note. For one, a Contract Coordinator tends to have more use for skills like Vendor Relations, Purchase Orders, Contractual Agreements, and Providers. Meanwhile, a typical Operations Associate makes use out of skills like Financial Advisor, Store Audits, Equity, and Client Relationships. The difference in skills between the two professions really shows how different the two are.

    In general, Operations Associates make a higher salary in the Finance industry with an average of $72,314.

    When it comes to education, these two careers couldn't be more different. For example, Operations Associates reach similar levels of education when compared to Contract Coordinators. The difference is that they're 2.9% more likely to earn a Master's Degree less, and 1.8% less likely to graduate with a Doctoral Degree.