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Become A Crop Scout

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Working As A Crop Scout

  • $23,249

    Average Salary

Example Of What A Crop Scout does

  • Decide and advise on the types of disease control to implement.
  • Inspected beans (cleared bean fields of weeds)
  • Recorded findings of disease, weed and insect pressure Reported analysis to growers
  • Check fields for diseases, weather damage and yield count
  • Send weekly reports to grower, Greenpoint Ag manager, and scouting director.
  • Managed and collected soil samples as determined by Lead Agronomist.
  • Analyzed crop fields for large commercial cotton producers Collected information and compiled statistics for clients Identified potential problems and submitted advisory reports
  • Worked directly with local Greenpoint Ag agribusiness to identify potential scouting customers.
  • Performed yield estimates to determine the approximate sellable units of each hybrid.
  • Collect tissue samples three times per field during season and send to A & L labs.
  • Managed, recorded and processed various row crop test plots.
  • Assisted manager with the coordination of products, delivery and services to customers.

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How To Become A Crop Scout

Agricultural workers typically receive on-the-job training. A high school diploma is not needed for most jobs as an agricultural worker; however, a high school diploma typically is needed for animal breeders.

Education and Training

Most agricultural workers do not need a high school diploma; however, a high school diploma typically is needed for animal breeders. Some jobs as an animal breeder may require some postsecondary education.

Agricultural workers typically receive some short-term on-the-job training. Employers instruct them on how to use simple farming tools and more complex machinery while following appropriate safety procedures. More experienced workers also are expected to perform routine maintenance on the tools they use.

Important Qualities

Dexterity. Agricultural workers need excellent hand–eye coordination to harvest crops and operate farm machinery.

Listening skills. Agricultural workers need to work well with others. Because they take instructions from farmers and other agricultural managers, effective listening is critical.

Physical stamina. Agricultural workers need to be able to perform laborious tasks repeatedly.

Physical strength. Agricultural workers must be strong enough to lift heavy objects, including tools and crops.

Mechanical skills. Agricultural workers must be able to operate complex farm machinery. They also occasionally do routine maintenance on the machinery.

Work Experience in a Related Occupation

Animal breeders sometimes need previous work experience interacting with livestock. Ranch workers may transition into animal breeding after they become more familiar with animals and learn how to handle them.

Advancement

Agricultural workers may advance to crew leader or other supervisory positions. The ability to speak both English and Spanish is helpful for agricultural supervisors.

Some agricultural workers aspire to become farmers, ranchers, or agricultural managers or to own their own farms and ranches. Knowledge of produce and livestock may provide an excellent background for becoming buyers or purchasing agents of farm products. Those who earn a college degree in agricultural science could become agricultural or food scientists.

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Crop Scout jobs

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Crop Scout Demographics

Gender

  • Male

    73.0%
  • Female

    26.4%
  • Unknown

    0.6%

Ethnicity

  • White

    88.8%
  • Hispanic or Latino

    5.6%
  • Asian

    3.6%
  • Unknown

    1.7%
  • Black or African American

    0.3%
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Crop Scout

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Crop Scout Education

Crop Scout

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Top Skills for A Crop Scout

DiseaseControlBeanFieldsSoilSamplesPesticideRecommendationsStandCountsGPSYieldEstimatesTissueSamplesLivestockFamilyFarmWeatherDamagePlantPopulationInsectDamageTestPlotsGrowerServices.CropNutrientDeficiencyIdentificationATVAGWeeklyReportsInsectPressureTerritory

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Top Crop Scout Skills

  1. Disease Control
  2. Bean Fields
  3. Soil Samples
You can check out examples of real life uses of top skills on resumes here:
  • Summer internship scouting crops to ensure proper weed, pest, and disease control.
  • Scouted corn and bean fields for pests and diseases.
  • Managed and collected soil samples as determined by Lead Agronomist.
  • Performed yield estimates to determine the approximate sellable units of each hybrid.
  • Collect tissue samples three times per field during season and send to A & L labs.

Top Crop Scout Employers

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