Log In

Log In to Save

Sign Up to Save

Sign Up to Dismiss

or

The email and password you specified are invalid. Please, try again.

Email and password are mandatory

Forgot Password?

Don't have an account? Sign Up

reset password

Enter your email address and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Back to Log In

Become A CT Technologist

Where do you want to work?

To get started, tell us where you'd like to work.
Sorry, we can't find that. Please try a different city or state.

Working As A CT Technologist

  • Assisting and Caring for Others
  • Performing for or Working Directly with the Public
  • Getting Information
  • Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge
  • Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates
  • Deal with People

  • Unpleasant/Angry People

  • Unpleasant/Hazardous Environment

  • Repetitive

  • $56,670

    Average Salary

What Does A CT Technologist Do

A CT Technologist's role involves the use of computerized tomography (CT) scanners to diagnose patients' medical issues. This process consists of producing cross-section images of internal organs and tissues.

How To Become A CT Technologist

Radiologic technologists and MRI technologists typically need an associate’s degree. Many MRI technologists start out as radiologic technologists and specialize later in their career. Radiologic technologists must be licensed or certified in most states. Few states license MRI technologists. Employers typically require or prefer prospective technologists to be certified even if the state does not require it.

Education

An associate’s degree is the most common educational requirement for radiologic and MRI technologists. There also are postsecondary education programs that lead to graduate certificates or bachelor’s degrees. Education programs typically include both classroom study and clinical work. Coursework includes anatomy, pathology, patient care, radiation physics and protection, and image evaluation.

The Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT) accredits programs in radiography. Completing an accredited program is required for licensure in some states.

High school students who are interested in radiologic or MRI technology should take courses that focus on math and science, such as anatomy, biology, chemistry, physiology, and physics. 

Work Experience in a Related Occupation

MRI technologists typically have less than 5 years of work experience as radiologic technologists.

Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations

Radiologic technologists must be licensed or certified in most states. Few states license MRI technologists. Requirements vary by state.

To become licensed, technologists must usually graduate from an accredited program, and pass a certification exam from the state or obtain a certification from a certifying body. Certifications for radiologic technologists are available from the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT). Certifications for MRI technologists are available from the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) and from the American Registry of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Technologists (ARMRIT). For specific licensure requirements for radiologic technologists and MRI technologists, contact the state’s health board.

Employers typically require or prefer prospective technologists to be certified even if the state does not require it.

Important Qualities

Detail oriented. Radiologic and MRI technologists must follow exact instructions to get the images needed for diagnoses.

Interpersonal skills. Radiologic and MRI technologists work closely with patients who may be in extreme pain or mentally stressed. Technologists must be able to put the patient at ease to get usable images.

Math skills. Radiologic and MRI technologists may need to calculate and mix the right doses of chemicals used in imaging procedures.

Physical stamina. Radiologic and MRI technologists often work on their feet for long periods during their shift and they must be able to lift and move patients who need assistance.

Technical skills. Radiologic and MRI technologists must understand how to operate complex machinery.

Show More

Show Less

CT Technologist jobs

Add To My Jobs
Job type you want
Full Time
Part Time
Internship
Temporary

Real CT Technologist Salaries

Job Title Company Location Start Date Salary
Ct-Technologist Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital-Plymouth Plymouth, MA Dec 31, 2014 $76,948
Ct-Technologist Jordan Hlospital Plymouth, MA Jan 01, 2012 $73,045
CT (CAT Scan) Technologist Thomas Jefferson University Hospital Philadelphia, PA Jun 09, 2010 $56,774
Cardio Vascular/Ct Technologist Cardiovascular Clinic of Texas Tomball, TX Jan 03, 2008 $55,000
Cardio Vascular/Ct Technologist Cardiovascular Clinic of Texas Tomball, TX Oct 01, 2007 $50,000
CT Technologist Saint Luke's Northland Hospital Kansas City, MO Oct 22, 2009 $48,356

No Results

To get more results, try adjusting your search by changing your filters.

Show More

Top Skills for A CT Technologist

SpecialProceduresIVTraumaPatientsQualityPatientCareRoutineExamsTomographySliceScannerToshibaAngiographyMRIDigitalRadiographyPhilipsBrillianceVenipunctureFluoroscopyACRQAHighQualityC-ArmRISPatientHistory

Show More

Top CT Technologist Skills

  1. Special Procedures
  2. IV
  3. Trauma Patients
You can check out examples of real life uses of top skills on resumes here:
  • Performed CT Scans, special procedures and diagnostic radiography.
  • Developed and delivered education to community on identifying and preventative measures for stroke.
  • Experienced patient caregiver with pediatric, geriatric and trauma patients in both clinical and emergent settings.
  • Communicated exam procedures to patients and answered related questions to provide quality patient care.
  • Performed all routine exams from head to extremities and trauma 1 exams when needed.

Top CT Technologist Employers

Show More

CT Technologist Videos

CT Technologist, Career Video from drkit.org

Medical Careers : How to Become a Heart Surgeon

Radiology Technician: Career Training & Salary Overview

×