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Become A Design/Animation Instructor

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Working As A Design/Animation Instructor

  • Training and Teaching Others
  • Performing for or Working Directly with the Public
  • Coaching and Developing Others
  • Guiding, Directing, and Motivating Subordinates
  • Making Decisions and Solving Problems
  • $78,000

    Average Salary

What Does A Design/Animation Instructor Do

Career and technical education teachers instruct students in various technical and vocational subjects, such as auto repair, healthcare, and culinary arts. They teach academic and technical content to provide students with the skills and knowledge necessary to enter an occupation.

Duties

Career and technical education teachers typically do the following:

  • Create lesson plans and assignments
  • Instruct students on how to develop certain skills
  • Show how to apply classroom knowledge through hands-on activities
  • Demonstrate and supervise the safe and proper use of tools and equipment
  • Monitor students’ progress, assign tasks, and grade assignments
  • Discuss students’ progress with parents, students, and counselors
  • Develop and enforce classroom rules and safety procedures

Career and technical education teachers help students explore and prepare to enter a specific occupation, in fields such as healthcare or information technology. They use a variety of teaching techniques to help students learn and develop skills related to a specific career or field of study. They demonstrate tasks, techniques, and tools used in an occupation. They may assign hands-on tasks, such as replacing brakes on cars, taking blood pressure, or recording vital signs. Teachers typically oversee these tasks in workshops and laboratories in the school.

Some teachers establish relationships with local businesses and nonprofit organizations to provide practical work experience for students. They also serve as advisers to students participating in career and technical student organizations.

The specific duties of career and technical education teachers vary by the grade and subject they teach. In middle schools and high schools, they teach general concepts in a classroom and through practical exercises in workshops and laboratories.

In postsecondary schools, they teach specific career skills that help students earn a certificate, diploma, or an associate’s degree, and prepare them for a specific job. For example, welding instructors teach students various welding techniques and essential safety practices. They also monitor the use of tools and equipment, and have students practice procedures until they meet the specific standards required by the trade.

In most states, teachers in middle and high schools instruct one subject within the 16 major career fields, also known as Career Clusters. For example, the career cluster known as architecture and construction includes instruction in designing, planning, managing, building, and maintaining structures.

Teachers instructing courses in agricultural, food, and natural resources teach topics such as agricultural production; agriculture-related business; veterinary science; and plant, animal, and food systems. For example, they may have students plant and care for crops and tend to animals so that students can apply what they have learned in the classroom.

Career and technical education teachers in hospitality and tourism teach students in subjects such as nutrition, culinary arts, or hotel lodging. For example, teachers may instruct and supervise students in creating menus and preparing food.

Some teach the skills necessary to work as technicians and assistants, such as nursing and dental assistants in health-science occupations.

For information on all 16 major Career Clusters and programs in all other states, visit National Association of State Directors of Career Technical Education Consortium.

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How To Become A Design/Animation Instructor

Career and technical education teachers must have a bachelor’s degree. They also need work experience in the subject they teach. Some teachers, particularly those in public schools, also may be required to have a state-issued certification or license. Requirements for certification vary by state.

Education

Career and technical education teachers in public schools generally need a bachelor’s degree in the field they teach, such as agriculture, engineering, or computer science.

Work Experience in a Related Occupation

Many career and technical education teachers need work experience in the field they teach. For example, automotive mechanics, chefs, and nurses typically spend years in their career before moving into teaching.

Training

Some states require prospective career and technical education teachers to complete a period of fieldwork, commonly referred to as student teaching. In some states, this program is a prerequisite for a license to teach in public schools. During student teaching, prospective teachers gain experience in preparing lessons and teaching students under the supervision and guidance of a mentor teacher. The amount of time required for these programs varies by state, but may last from 1 to 2 years.

Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations

States may require career and technical education teachers in public schools to be licensed or certified. Requirements for certification vary by state. Most states require teachers to pass a background check.

Certification typically requires completing a student teaching program and a bachelor’s degree. States usually require candidates to pass a general teaching certification test.

Teachers may be required to complete annual professional development courses to maintain their license. For certification requirements in your state, visit Teach.org.

Some states offer an alternative route to certification for prospective teachers who have a bachelor’s degree or work experience in their field, but lack the education courses required for certification. Alternative programs typically cover teaching methods, development of lesson plans, and classroom management.

In addition to teaching certification, career and technical education teachers who prepare students for an occupation that requires a license or certification may need to have and maintain the same credential. For example, career and technical education teachers who instruct welding may need to have certification in welding.

Advancement

Experienced teachers can advance to become mentors and lead teachers, helping less experienced teachers to improve their teaching skills.

Teachers may become school counselors, instructional coordinators, or principals. These positions generally require additional education, an advanced degree, or certification. An advanced degree in education administration or leadership may be helpful.

Important Qualities

Communication skills. Career and technical education teachers must be able to explain technical concepts in terms that students can understand.

Organizational skills. Career and technical education teachers have many students in different classes throughout the day. They must be able to organize their time and teaching materials.

Patience. Working with students of different abilities and backgrounds can be difficult. Teachers must be patient with each student in their classroom and develop a positive learning environment.

Resourcefulness. Teachers need to be able to develop different ways of presenting information and demonstrating tasks so that students can learn.

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Design/Animation Instructor Career Paths

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Design/Animation Instructor Demographics

Gender

Male

62.5%

Female

25.0%

Unknown

12.5%
Ethnicity

White

58.6%

Hispanic or Latino

16.6%

Asian

11.6%

Black or African American

9.6%

Unknown

3.6%
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Foreign Languages Spoken

Spanish

33.3%

Mandarin

20.0%

Chinese

13.3%

Korean

13.3%

Ukrainian

6.7%

French

6.7%

Russian

6.7%
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Design/Animation Instructor Education

Schools

Savannah College of Art and Design

18.6%

School of Visual Arts

16.6%

Academy of Art University

8.3%

Ringling College of Art and Design

6.2%

Full Sail University

4.8%

California Institute of the Arts

4.8%

Art Center College of Design

4.1%

Art Institute of Pittsburgh

4.1%

Columbia College Chicago

3.4%

New York University

3.4%

Parsons the New School for Design

3.4%

Virginia Commonwealth University

2.8%

Art Institute of California - Inland

2.8%

San Francisco State University

2.8%

Rochester Institute of Technology

2.8%

School of the Art Institute of Chicago

2.8%

O'More College of Design

2.1%

Art Institute of Philadelphia

2.1%

Otis College of Art and Design

2.1%

Pennsylvania State University

2.1%
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Majors

Animation

26.1%

Graphic Design

23.5%

Fine Arts

13.6%

Photography

7.0%

Computer Science

5.5%

Design And Visual Communication

4.1%

Communication

2.9%

Visual And Performing Arts

2.6%

General Education, Specific Areas

2.3%

Computer Applications

2.0%

Architecture

1.4%

Alternative And Complementary Medicine And Medical Systems

1.2%

Drafting And Design

1.2%

Marketing

1.2%

Digital Media

1.2%

Audiovisual Communications Technologies

0.9%

Graphic Communications

0.9%

Elementary Education

0.9%

English

0.9%

Environmental Design

0.9%
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Degrees

Bachelors

57.9%

Masters

15.8%

Other

14.3%

Associate

5.7%

Certificate

3.1%

Diploma

2.6%

Doctorate

0.5%
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Job type you want
Full Time
Part Time
Internship
Temporary
Average Yearly Salary
$78,000
View Detailed Salary Report
$36,000
Min 10%
$78,000
Median 50%
$78,000
Median 50%
$78,000
Median 50%
$78,000
Median 50%
$78,000
Median 50%
$78,000
Median 50%
$78,000
Median 50%
$167,000
Max 90%
Best Paying Company
Technicolor
Highest Paying City
Minneapolis, MN
Highest Paying State
North Dakota
Avg Experience Level
2.3 years
How much does a Design/Animation Instructor make at top companies?
The national average salary for a Design/Animation Instructor in the United States is $78,503 per year or $38 per hour. Those in the bottom 10 percent make under $36,000 a year, and the top 10 percent make over $167,000.

Real Design/Animation Instructor Salaries

Job Title Company Location Start Date Salary
Designer/Animator II Troika Design Group Inc. Los Angeles, CA Jul 15, 2012 $82,000
Animation Designer Searchlight Solutions Inc. Pleasanton, CA Aug 11, 2015 $75,000
Animator/Designer Oven Bits, LLC San Francisco, CA Aug 15, 2013 $70,000
Designer/Animator Imaginary Forces, LLC New York, NY Sep 19, 2014 $65,000 -
$85,000
Designer/Animator (I) Troika Design Group Inc. Los Angeles, CA Nov 01, 2014 $62,316
Designer/Animator Logan East, Inc. New York, NY Sep 03, 2015 $60,000
Designer/Animator Touchtunes Music Corporation New York, NY Sep 09, 2016 $60,000
President/Designer/Animator Galya Kay Inc. New York, NY Sep 15, 2016 $60,000 -
$65,000
Designer/Animator, On-Air Design E! Entertainment Television Los Angeles, CA Sep 06, 2011 $57,781
Designer/Animator, On-Air Design E! Entertainment Television Los Angeles, CA Aug 21, 2011 $57,781
Design Animator The Univision Network Limited Partnership Miami, FL Oct 15, 2013 $56,558
Motion Designer/Animator Mary Nittolo, Inc. Nyack, NY Aug 01, 2016 $56,349
President/Designer/Animator Galya Kay, Inc. New York, NY Sep 15, 2016 $56,000 -
$65,000
Designer/Animator Mirada, LLC Los Angeles, CA Oct 01, 2011 $55,000 -
$70,000
Designer/Animator Imaginary Forces, LLC New York, NY Sep 22, 2015 $52,000 -
$70,000
Motion Designer and Animator Local Projects LLC New York, NY Sep 12, 2012 $50,168
Animation Designer FUHU, Inc. El Segundo, CA Feb 18, 2013 $50,000
Designer Animator Buck Design, Inc. New York, NY Aug 27, 2015 $48,000 -
$50,000
President/Designer/Animator Galya Kay, Inc. New York, NY Sep 15, 2014 $48,000 -
$54,000

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Top Skills for A Design/Animation Instructor

  1. Graphic Design
  2. Adobe Photoshop
  3. Video Production
You can check out examples of real life uses of top skills on resumes here:
  • Lead graphic designer in a browser based software that the company intended to sell to casinos.
  • Provided design, development and art direction on large video programs.
  • Teach the techniques involved in animating 3D models in 3D scenes utilizing sophisticated software such as Maya for games.
  • Created elements in Adobe Illustrator and Cinema 4D and animated in After Effects.
  • Created multimedia content presentations for Medical, Life Science and engineering fields.

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Top 10 Best States for Design/Animation Instructors

  1. Wyoming
  2. Alaska
  3. California
  4. Iowa
  5. Wisconsin
  6. Oregon
  7. North Dakota
  8. District of Columbia
  9. Ohio
  10. Michigan
  • (25 jobs)
  • (7 jobs)
  • (484 jobs)
  • (58 jobs)
  • (49 jobs)
  • (76 jobs)
  • (13 jobs)
  • (18 jobs)
  • (60 jobs)
  • (69 jobs)

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