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Become A District Leader

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Working As A District Leader

  • Making Decisions and Solving Problems
  • Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates
  • Getting Information
  • Coordinating the Work and Activities of Others
  • Guiding, Directing, and Motivating Subordinates
  • Deal with People

  • Make Decisions

  • Stressful

  • $97,730

    Average Salary

What Does A District Leader Do At CVS Health

* Set the expectation, standard and example for customer service within the district
* Manages the Pharmacy Supervisor, and partners with him/her to drive pharmacy sales and service.
* Manages the total store operations of the district within budget
* Manages district expense control and shrink and asset management
* Drives sales, improves margin/profitability and reduces expenses within the district
* Responsible for delivery and execution of new and ongoing programs
* Responsible for selection, guidance, training, performance management and accountability of all exempt level associates in the district (Store Managers, Assistant Managers and Pharmacists), including acclimating new field management staff to the company and or new position
* Represents CVS in all issues and opportunities within the area of responsibility
* Supervises support staff to drive results in the district (RCS, Pharmacy Trainer, Training Store Managers, Pharmacy Trainers, etc)
* Partners with Regional or Area level support teams (LP Managers, HR Business, etc

What Does A District Leader Do At Golden Living

* Perform repairs and/or supervise the day-to-day repair, improvement and preventative maintenance of the building, equipment, lawn and grounds; arrange for and manage outside repair, maintenance and construction services according to policies and procedures; and may perform and supervise floor care
* Ensure equipment and work areas are clean, safe and orderly; and strict adherence to procedures regarding cleaners or hazardous materials or objects; ensure Universal Precautions and infection control, isolation, fire, safety and sanitation practices and procedures are followed; and promptly address any hazardous conditions and equipment
* Act as liaison to provide training and monitor the Preventive Maintenance program including OSHA, Life Safety and State compliance reviews
* Act as contact for all work for the buildings in the area of responsibility as directed by management.
* Coordinate with Construction Service as necessary to insure optimal use of resources
* Act as liaison with appropriate Facility and Construction management to resolve problems and expedite services on construction projects
* Travel to designated facilities as necessary to assess condition, deployment of special projects, and to coordinate planning/survey schedules
* Partner with Facility management with interviewing and training Maintenance Supervisors.
* Evaluate facility for maintenance purposes.
* Keep staff informed of all changes that will affect them.
* Assure that facilities meet all company policies, federal, local, state regulations regarding environment
* Coordinate quarterly conference calls for all buildings in area of responsibility
* Coordinate continuous educational training programs
* Attend training seminars as assigned
* CODE OF CONDUCT
* Must adhere to the Company's Code of Conduct and Business Ethics policy including documentation and reporting responsibilities
* Position Requirements

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How To Become A District Leader

Although education and training requirements vary widely by position and industry, many top executives have at least a bachelor’s degree and a considerable amount of work experience. 

Education

Many top executives have a bachelor’s or master’s degree in business administration or in an area related to their field of work. Top executives in the public sector often have a degree in business administration, public administration, law, or the liberal arts. Top executives of large corporations often have a master’s degree in business administration (MBA).

College presidents and school superintendents are typically required to have a master’s degree, although a doctorate is often preferred.

Although many mayors, governors, or other public sector executives have at least a bachelor’s degree, these positions typically do not have any specific education requirements.

Work Experience in a Related Occupation

Many top executives advance within their own firm, moving up from lower level managerial or supervisory positions. However, other companies may prefer to hire qualified candidates from outside their organization. Top executives who are promoted from lower level positions may be able to substitute experience for education to move up in the company. For example, in industries such as retail trade or transportation, workers without a college degree may work their way up to higher levels within the company to become executives or general managers.

Chief executives typically need extensive managerial experience. Executives are also expected to have experience in the organization’s area of specialty. Most general and operations managers hired from outside an organization need lower level supervisory or management experience in a related field.

Some general managers advance to higher level managerial or executive positions. Company training programs, executive development programs, and certification can often benefit managers or executives hoping to advance.

Important Qualities

Communication skills. Top executives must be able to communicate clearly and persuasively. They must effectively discuss issues and negotiate with others, direct subordinates, and explain their policies and decisions to those within and outside the organization.

Decisionmaking skills. Top executives need decisionmaking skills when setting policies and managing an organization. They must assess different options and choose the best course of action, often daily.

Leadership skills. Top executives must be able to lead an organization successfully by coordinating policies, people, and resources.

Management skills. Top executives must shape and direct the operations of an organization. For example, they must manage business plans, employees, and budgets.

Problem-solving skills. Top executives need to identify and resolve issues within an organization. They must be able to recognize shortcomings and effectively carry out solutions.

Time-management skills. Top executives do many tasks at the same time, typically under their own direction, to ensure that their work gets done and that they meet their goals.

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District Leader jobs

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Top Skills for A District Leader

TermLifeInsuranceCustomerServiceSalesGrowthTerritoryRouteSalesRepresentativesSalonPLossPreventionFinancialServicesSupervisePrimericaFinancialPayrollSalesGoalsCustomerSatisfactionWeeklyConferenceCallsCompanyPoliciesAutoMarketShareAnnualSalesFinancialGoals

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Top District Leader Skills

  1. Term Life Insurance
  2. Customer Service
  3. Sales Growth
You can check out examples of real life uses of top skills on resumes here:
  • Provided solutions in the area of term life insurance, mutual funds, variable annuities, and debt consolidation loans.
  • Developed performance oriented customer service culture.
  • Concentrated on sales growth and profitability, customer satisfaction and merchandising standards.
  • Averaged 150% of quota in Suffolk County territory.
  • Led a large format team of 25 Route Sales Representatives to service 35 of the largest customers in the Zone.

Top District Leader Employers

District Leader Videos

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