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Become A Door Installer

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Working As A Door Installer

  • Getting Information
  • Performing General Physical Activities
  • Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Material
  • Handling and Moving Objects
  • Organizing, Planning, and Prioritizing Work
  • Deal with People

  • Unpleasant/Hazardous Environment

  • Outdoors/walking/standing

  • Make Decisions

  • $42,090

    Average Salary

What Does A Door Installer Do At The Window Guys of Florida

Measure openings for window ordering Quality control on jobs Schedule Installations Accept Deliveries and Check Material Check openings in new construction Go to job site meetings Meet with inspectors Walk Jobs to close out Work closely with other team members to assure a smooth job process Follow up with manufacturers to check order dates

How To Become A Door Installer

Although most carpenters learn their trade through an apprenticeship, some learn on the job, starting as a helper.

Education

A high school diploma or equivalent is required. High school courses in mathematics, mechanical drawing, and general vocational technical training are considered useful.

Training

Most carpenters learn their trade through a 3- or 4-year apprenticeship program. For each year of a typical program, apprentices must complete at least 144 hours of technical training and 2,000 hours of paid on-the-job training. In the technical training, apprentices learn carpentry basics, blueprint reading, mathematics, building code requirements, and safety and first-aid practices. They also may receive specialized training in creating and setting concrete forms, rigging, welding, scaffold building, working within confined workspaces, and fall protection. All carpenters must pass the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) 10- and 30-hour safety courses.

After finishing an apprenticeship, carpenters are considered to be journey workers and may perform tasks on their own.

Several groups, including unions and contractor associations, sponsor apprenticeship programs. Some apprenticeship programs have preferred entry for veterans. The basic qualifications for a person to enter an apprenticeship program are as follows:

  • Minimum age of 18
  • High school education or equivalent
  • Physically able to do the work
  • U.S. citizen or proof of legal residency
  • Pass substance abuse screening

Some contractors have their own carpenter training program, which may be an accredited apprenticeship program.

Although many workers enter apprenticeships directly, some carpenters start out as helpers.

Some workers can earn certificates before entering an apprenticeship. The National Association of Home Builders offers Pre-Apprenticeship Certificate Training (PACT) through the Home Builders Institute. PACT is available for several different groups, from youths to veterans, and covers information for eight construction trades, including painting.

Workers typically learn the proper use of hand and power tools on the job. They often start by working with more experienced carpenters and are given more complex tasks as they prove that they can handle simpler tasks, such as measuring and cutting wooden and metal studs.

A number of 2-year technical schools offer carpentry degrees that are affiliated with unions or contractor organizations. Credits earned as part of an apprenticeship program usually count toward an associate’s degree.

Advancement

Because they are involved in all phases of construction, carpenters usually have more opportunities than other construction workers to become first-line supervisors, independent contractors, or general construction supervisors.

Carpenters seeking advancement often take additional training provided by associations, unions, or employers. Communication in both English and Spanish also is helpful for relaying instructions to workers.

Important Qualities

Business skills. Self-employed carpenters must be able to bid on new jobs, track inventory, and plan work assignments. 

Detail oriented. Carpenters perform many tasks that are important in the overall building process. Making precise measurements, for example, may reduce gaps between windows and frames, limiting any leaks around the window.

Dexterity. Carpenters use many tools and need hand-eye coordination to avoid injury or damaging materials. Striking the head of a nail, for example, is crucial to not damaging wood or injuring oneself.

Math skills. Carpenters use basic math skills every day to calculate volume and measure materials to be cut.

Physical stamina. Carpenters need physical endurance. They frequently stand, climb, or bend for long periods.

Physical strength. Carpenters use tools and materials that are heavy. For example, plywood sheets can weigh 50 to 100 pounds.

Problem-solving skills. Because construction jobs vary, carpenters must adjust project plans accordingly. For example, if a prefabricated window arrives at the worksite slightly oversized, carpenters must shave framework to make the window fit.

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Door Installer Demographics

Gender

  • Male

    95.2%
  • Female

    3.5%
  • Unknown

    1.3%

Ethnicity

  • White

    78.8%
  • Hispanic or Latino

    13.5%
  • Asian

    5.9%
  • Unknown

    1.1%
  • Black or African American

    0.6%
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Languages Spoken

  • Spanish

    46.2%
  • German

    7.7%
  • Bosnian

    7.7%
  • French

    7.7%
  • Serbian

    7.7%
  • Russian

    7.7%
  • Italian

    7.7%
  • Croatian

    7.7%
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Door Installer

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Door Installer Education

Door Installer

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Top Skills for A Door Installer

NewWindowsJobSiteBasicHandToolsCarpentrySkillsDoorFramesOutstandingCustomerServiceVinylOLDWindowsNewConstructionShowerDoorsAluminumWindowsCustomerSatisfactionRemovalDepotGlassDoorsPatioDoorsResidentialGarageDoorsDoorInstallationWeatherReplacementWindowsEntryDoors

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Top Door Installer Skills

  1. New Windows
  2. Job Site
  3. Basic Hand Tools
You can check out examples of real life uses of top skills on resumes here:
  • Install new windows and doors, including sliding glass doors, bay and bows, in new and old structure homes.
  • Involved with working as a team of 3-4, to reach customer satisfaction on job sites.
  • Frame garage and shop door frames to be fit for a new I installation or repair of an old garage door.
  • Provided outstanding customer service with very low job call backs.
  • Read blue prints for step by step procedures for managing vinyl and canvas materials through air powered sewingmachines.

Top Door Installer Employers

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