What Does An Energy Auditor Do?

Energy Auditors average about $34.66 an hour, which is roughly an annual salary of $72,091. Additionally, Energy Auditors are known to earn anywhere from $41,000 to $124,000 a year. This means that the top-earning Energy Auditors make $83,000 more than the lowest earning ones.

Let's say you're currently a Energy Auditor, but maybe you're looking for a new opportunity. You may even be playing around with the idea of becoming a Energy Auditor. If that's the case, you'll probably want to know how these roles compare to other positions. Luckily, you came to the right place. Here, you'll find extensive information on roles such as a Home Performance Consultant, Alternative Energy Technician, Energy Conservation Representative, and Solar Energy Specialist just so you can compare job roles and responsibilities. We'll explain how these compare to Energy Auditors in a bit.

Energy Auditor Job Description

Here are the duties and responsibilities that an Energy Auditor is likely to perform in their role.

  • Measure future conservation savings, manage databases, represent association members, conduct workshops.
  • Compose audit reports using BPI protocol including pictures and audit data.
  • Install energy saving measures: CFL bulbs, aerators for faucets/sinks.
  • Assist customers and solar PV contractors with inquiries to facilitate the NEM enrollment process.
  • Perform energy efficiency test-ins and test-outs in accordance with BPI and NYSERDA standards and regulations2.
  • Conduct CAZ test of combustion appliances, analyzing for spillage, draft, and Co2.
  • Perform preventive maintenance on residential HVAC equipment.
  • Utilize combustion analyzer on appliances to evaluate system performance, and perform combustion appliance zone (CAZ) tests.
  • Perform calculations to determine HVAC system sizing, combustion air and attic ventilation requirements.
  • Perform analysis of technology for implementation by identification of the energy saving prize, ROI, and payback length.

Energy Auditor Skills and Personality Traits

We calculated that 34% of Energy Auditors are proficient in Audit Procedures, Blower-Door Tests, and Safety Issues.

We break down the percentage of Energy Auditors that have these skills listed on their resume here:

  • Audit Procedures, 34%

    Developed playbooks and enhanced audit procedures for Walmart's profit recovery program.

  • Blower-Door Tests, 7%

    Performed tests such as blower-door tests to locate air leaks and determine air changeover ratios.

  • Safety Issues, 6%

    Scheduled audits with clients, audited homes for health and safety issues, and addressed accordingly.

  • Hvac, 5%

    Performed calculations to determine HVAC system sizing, combustion air and attic ventilation requirements.

  • Independent Contractor, 5%

    Supervised and instructed technicians and independent contractors effectively.

  • BPI, 4%

    Performed energy efficiency test-ins and test-outs in accordance with BPI and NYSERDA standards and regulations2.

Additionally, Energy Auditors have more skills than just Audit Procedures, Blower-Door Tests, and Safety Issues. Read about their personality traits here:

Over half of Energy Auditors have graduated with a bachelor's degree. In fact, it seems 40.2% of people who became a Energy Auditor earned a bachelor's degree. When it comes down to graduating with a master's degree roughly 15.0% in this career have them. If you're wanting to pursue this career, it seems it may be possible to be successful with a high school degree. In fact, most Energy Auditors have a college degree. But about one out of every six Energy Auditors didn't attend college at all.

Those Energy Auditors who do attend college, typically earn either Business degrees or Mechanical Engineering degrees. Less commonly earned degrees for Energy Auditors include Legal Research And Advanced Professional Studies degrees or Environmental Control Technologies/Technicians degrees.

But if you want to earn the most bang for your buck, Energy Auditors tend to earn the biggest salaries at George S. May, Lime, and TRC Companies. Take George S. May for example. The median Energy Auditor salary is $136,981. At Lime, Energy Auditors earn an average of $95,416, while the average at TRC Companies is $95,178. Now before you get too googly-eyed over those digits, take into consideration how difficult it might be to secure a job with one of these companies. While George S. May has 0 job listings for Energy Auditors, Lime and TRC Companies only have 0 and 0 job listings respectively.

The most prestigious Energy Auditors can be found working at SolarCity, Penn State Seed Co, and US DEPT OF ENERGY NETL. We determine this by assessing the schools where Energy Auditors have earned their degrees, and then looking at the companies that have hired a significant number of Energy Auditors from the top 100 educational institutions in the United States.

The industries that Energy Auditors fulfill the most roles in are the Finance and Professional industries. But Energy Auditors make the most amount of money in the Professional industry, averaging $86,279. In the Construction industry they only make $83,788 and average about $77,964 in the Hospitality industry. In conclusion, Energy Auditors who work in the Professional industry earn a 42.5% higher salary than Energy Auditors in the Utilities industry.

The three companies that hire the most prestigious graphic designers are:

    How an Energy Auditor Compares to a Home Performance Consultant

    First up to compare is the job of a Home Performance Consultant. Let's start with salary. Generally speaking, Home Performance Consultants receive $1,158 lower pay than Energy Auditors per year.

    The two careers find some common ground in the skills department though. Both Energy Auditors and Home Performance Consultants alike are skilled in Hvac, BPI, and Customer Service.

    These skill sets are where the common ground ends though. an Energy Auditor is more likely to need to be skilled in Audit Procedures, Blower-Door Tests, Safety Issues, and Independent Contractor. Whereas a Home Performance Consultant requires skills like Financial Advantages, Manual D, RUN Manual J, and Blower Door. Just by understanding these different skills you can see how truly different these careers are.

    On average, Home Performance Consultants reach higher levels of education than Energy Auditors. In fact, Home Performance Consultants are 6.7% more likely to earn a Master's Degree and 0.9% less likely to graduate with a Doctoral Degree.

    How an Energy Auditor Compares to an Alternative Energy Technician

    Now we'll compare Alternative Energy Technicians, which averages a lower salary of $3,226 lower than Energy Auditors a year.

    A similarity between the two careers of Energy Auditors and Alternative Energy Technicians are the skills associated with both roles. The similar skills include Hvac, BPI, and Efficient Products.

    In addition to the difference in salary, there are some other key differences that are worth noting. For example, a Energy Auditor is more likely to have skills in Audit Procedures, Blower-Door Tests, Safety Issues, and Independent Contractor, while a typical Alternative Energy Technician is skilled in areas such as Safe Environment, Blower Door, Troubleshoot, and Shower Heads. These differences highlight just how different the day-to-day in each role looks.

    When it comes to education, Alternative Energy Technicians tend to reach similar levels of education than Energy Auditors. In fact, they're 0.3% less likely to graduate with a Master's Degree and 0.9% more likely to earn a Doctoral Degree.

    How an Energy Auditor Compares to an Energy Conservation Representative

    In the hole for a comparison are Energy Conservation Representatives. On an average basis, this career brings in lower money than Energy Auditors with a lower salary of $13,215 annually.

    Both Energy Auditors and Energy Conservation Representatives utilize similar skills, such as Hvac, Efficient Products, and Customer Service, but beyond that the careers look very different.

    Some important key differences between the two careers are the other skills necessary to get the job done. For example, a Energy Auditor is likely to be skilled in Audit Procedures, Blower-Door Tests, Safety Issues, and Independent Contractor, whereas a Energy Conservation Representative is skilled in Phone Calls, Door Sales, Outbound Calls, and DTE.

    Is less better than more? Maybe in some cases, but when you're talking about Energy Conservation Representatives they typically study at lower levels than Energy Auditors. In fact, they're 7.1% less likely to graduate with a Master's Degree, and 1.3% less likely to earn a Doctoral Degree.

    How an Energy Auditor Compares to a Solar Energy Specialist

    Last, but not least, are the Solar Energy Specialists who typically earn higher pay than Energy Auditors, with a difference of $10,372 per year.

    While both Energy Auditors and Solar Energy Specialists complete day-to-day tasks using similar skills like Hvac, BPI, and Efficient Products, the two careers also vary in other skills.

    This is where the similarities find their end though. Each job requires different skills like Audit Procedures, Blower-Door Tests, Safety Issues, and Independent Contractor, which can be used by a Energy Auditor. Then on the other side of things, Solar Energy Specialist uses skills like Blower Door, Program Guidelines, Open Enrollment, and Data Entry. Based on these skills, you can truly appreciate the difference between the two careers.

    Now, let's take a closer look at the financials in each career. The Construction industry tends to pay more for Solar Energy Specialists with an average of $83,153.

    On the topic of education, the two careers have some notable differences. Solar Energy Specialists reach similar levels of education than Energy Auditors with the likelihood of them earning a Master's Degree being 0.1% more. Plus, they're 0.5% more likely to graduate with a Doctoral Degree.