Energy Economist Careers

Do you care about issues like climate change, environmental stability, and indigenous rights? These are exactly the types of issues you'll be dealing with if you choose to become an energy economist. These economists frequently work for government agencies, research institutions, and academic organizations.

If you work for a government agency, you'll be expected to look at how the use of energy, including its production and transport, impacts the environment. You'll also calculate the cost of environmental impacts to determine which policy proposals should be undertaken to address energy needs.

Many energy economists also work for private companies and help them by advising about which energy investments to pursue. Energy economists can also use their expertise to work as energy loan specialists, energy project financial analysts, or energy business analysts. If you're hoping to get into this line of work, you'll need to get Bachelor's degree with an environmental focus.

There is more than meets the eye when it comes to being an energy economist. For example, did you know that they make an average of $35.54 an hour? That's $73,930 a year!

Between 2018 and 2028, the career is expected to grow 8% and produce 1,700 job opportunities across the U.S.

What Does an Energy Economist Do

There are certain skills that many energy economists have in order to accomplish their responsibilities. By taking a look through resumes, we were able to narrow down the most common skills for a person in this position. We discovered that a lot of resumes listed analytical skills, speaking skills and writing skills.

When it comes to searching for a job, many search for a key term or phrase. Instead, it might be more helpful to search by industry, as you might be missing jobs that you never thought about in industries that you didn't even think offered positions related to the energy economist job title. But what industry to start with? Most energy economists actually find jobs in the technology and finance industries.

How To Become an Energy Economist

If you're interested in becoming an energy economist, one of the first things to consider is how much education you need. We've determined that 45.8% of energy economists have a bachelor's degree. In terms of higher education levels, we found that 41.7% of energy economists have master's degrees. Even though most energy economists have a college degree, it's impossible to become one with only a high school degree or GED.

You may find that experience in other jobs will help you become an energy economist. In fact, many energy economist jobs require experience in a role such as economist. Meanwhile, many energy economists also have previous career experience in roles such as senior director or vice president.

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Average Salary
$73,930
Average Salary
Job Growth Rate
8%
Job Growth Rate
Job Openings
1,618
Job Openings

Average Salary for an Energy Economist

Energy Economists in America make an average salary of $73,930 per year or $36 per hour. The top 10 percent makes over $176,000 per year, while the bottom 10 percent under $30,000 per year.
Average Salary
$73,930
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Recently Added Salaries

CompanyascdescCompanyascdescStart DateascdescSalaryascdesc
Economist/M & E Specialist, Energy for Development
World Resources Institute
07/14/2021
$59,00007/14/2021
Energy Project Economist
Apex Clean Energy, Inc.
03/11/2019
$99,00003/11/2019
Economist-Climate and Energy
World Resources Institute
09/15/2016
$100,00009/15/2016
Energy Economist (Research Professional 3)
University of Alaska
01/29/2014
$61,69301/29/2014
Economist-Climate and Energy
World Resources Institute
11/04/2013
$90,00011/04/2013

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Energy Economist Demographics

Gender

male

68.2 %

female

27.3 %

unknown

4.5 %

Ethnicity

White

72.8 %

Asian

12.1 %

Hispanic or Latino

9.9 %

Foreign Languages Spoken

German

50.0 %

Italian

50.0 %
Show More Energy Economist Demographics

Energy Economist Education

Majors

Economics
39.3 %
Finance
14.3 %

Degrees

Bachelors

45.8 %

Masters

41.7 %

Doctorate

12.5 %

Top Colleges for Energy Economists

1. University of Southern California

Los Angeles, CA • Private

In-State Tuition
$56,225
Enrollment
19,548

2. University of Michigan - Ann Arbor

Ann Arbor, MI • Private

In-State Tuition
$15,262
Enrollment
30,079

3. University of Minnesota - Twin Cities

Minneapolis, MN • Private

In-State Tuition
$14,760
Enrollment
31,451

4. University of Pennsylvania

Philadelphia, PA • Private

In-State Tuition
$55,584
Enrollment
10,764

5. Northwestern University

Evanston, IL • Private

In-State Tuition
$54,568
Enrollment
8,451

6. Washington University in St Louis

Saint Louis, MO • Private

In-State Tuition
$53,399
Enrollment
7,356

7. University of Wisconsin - Madison

Madison, WI • Private

In-State Tuition
$10,555
Enrollment
30,360

8. Harvard University

Cambridge, MA • Private

In-State Tuition
$50,420
Enrollment
7,582

9. Stanford University

Stanford, CA • Private

In-State Tuition
$51,354
Enrollment
7,083

10. Cornell University

Ithaca, NY • Private

In-State Tuition
$55,188
Enrollment
15,105
Show More Energy Economist Education Requirements

Online Courses For Energy Economist That You May Like

Global Energy and Climate Policy
coursera

The Global Energy and Climate Policy course offers an introduction to the theoretical and practical understanding of how energy and climate change policies are designed, shaped, advocated and implemented. As energy markets go truly global, domestic energy policies are becoming more and more entangled with wider issues of international governance. Concurrently, the urgent need to mitigate and adapt to climate change and transition to a low-carbon future is adding a further layer of complexity. Th...

Investment Banking: The Complete Financial Ratio Analysis
udemy
4.2
(340)

Investment Banking For Investors & Financial Analysts - How to Perform Financial Statement Analysis & Company Valuation...

Politics and Economics of International Energy
coursera

Energy issues have always been important in international relations, but in recent years may have become even more important than in the past due to the widespread awareness of existing limits to energy sources and negative climate impacts. The course discusses global trends in energy consumption and production, various available scenarios for potential developments in the coming decades, the availability of oil reserves and the evolution of the oil industry. It then discusses natural gas and hi...

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Top Energy Economist Employers

1. World Bank
4.5
Avg. Salary: 
$140,584
Energy Economists Hired: 
3+
2. Black & Veatch
4.6
Avg. Salary: 
$89,066
Energy Economists Hired: 
2+
3. World Resources Institute
4.1
Avg. Salary: 
$102,087
Energy Economists Hired: 
2+
4. University of Alaska
4.3
Avg. Salary: 
$102,936
Energy Economists Hired: 
2+
5. United States Department of Energy
4.3
Avg. Salary: 
$67,690
Energy Economists Hired: 
1+
6. Purdue University
4.4
Avg. Salary: 
$68,727
Energy Economists Hired: 
1+
Updated August 18, 2021