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Become An Examiner

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Working As An Examiner

  • Assisting and Caring for Others
  • Getting Information
  • Interacting With Computers
  • Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge
  • Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates
  • Deal with People

  • Unpleasant/Angry People

  • Unpleasant/Hazardous Environment

  • Repetitive

  • Stressful

  • $31,630

    Average Salary

What Does An Examiner Do

Phlebotomists draw blood for tests, transfusions, research, or blood donations. Some of them explain their work to patients and provide assistance if patients have adverse reactions after their blood is drawn.

Duties

Phlebotomists typically do the following:

  • Draw blood from patients and blood donors
  • Talk with patients and donors to help them feel less nervous about having their blood drawn
  • Verify a patient’s or donor’s identity to ensure proper labeling of the blood
  • Label the drawn blood for testing or processing
  • Enter patient information into a database
  • Assemble and maintain medical instruments such as needles, test tubes, and blood vials

Phlebotomists primarily draw blood, which is then used for different kinds of medical laboratory testing. In medical and diagnostic laboratories, patient interaction is often only with the phlebotomist. Because all blood samples look the same, phlebotomists must identify and label the sample they have drawn and enter it into a database. Some phlebotomists draw blood for other purposes, such as at blood drives where people donate blood. In order to avoid causing infection or other complications, phlebotomists must keep their work area and instruments clean and sanitary.

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How To Become An Examiner

Phlebotomists typically enter the occupation with a postsecondary nondegree award from a phlebotomy program. Almost all employers look for phlebotomists who have earned professional certification.

Education and Training

Phlebotomists typically enter the occupation with a postsecondary nondegree award from a phlebotomy program. Programs are available from community colleges, vocational schools, or technical schools. These programs usually take less than 1 year to complete and lead to a certificate or diploma. Programs have classroom sessions and laboratory work and include instruction in anatomy, physiology, and medical terminology. Phlebotomists also learn specific procedures on how to identify, label, and track blood samples.

Many phlebotomists enter the occupation with a high school diploma and are trained to be a phlebotomist on the job.

Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations

Almost all employers prefer to hire phlebotomists who have earned professional certification.

Several organizations offer certifications for phlebotomists. The National Center for Competency Testing (NCCT), National Healthcareer Association (NHA), the American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP), and the American Medical Technologists (AMT) offer Phlebotomy Technician certifications.

Candidates for certification typically need some classroom education, as well as some clinical experience. Certification testing usually includes a written exam and may include practical components, such as drawing blood. Requirements vary by certifying organization. California, Louisiana, Nevada, and Washington require their phlebotomists to be certified.

Important Qualities

Compassion. Some patients or clients are afraid of having their blood drawn, so phlebotomists should be caring in performing their duties.

Detail oriented. Phlebotomists must draw the correct vials of blood for the tests ordered, track vials of blood, and enter data into a database. Attention to detail is necessary; otherwise, the specimens may be misplaced or lost, or a patient may be injured.

Dexterity. Phlebotomists work with their hands, and they must be able to use their equipment efficiently and properly.

Hand–eye coordination. Phlebotomists draw blood from many patients, and they must perform their duties successfully on the first attempt, or their patients will experience discomfort.

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Examiner jobs

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Examiner Demographics

Gender

Female

62.8%

Male

35.3%

Unknown

2.0%
Ethnicity

White

79.4%

Hispanic or Latino

10.5%

Asian

7.6%

Unknown

1.7%

Black or African American

0.7%
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Languages Spoken

Spanish

50.7%

French

7.8%

Japanese

5.5%

Russian

4.1%

Chinese

4.1%

Mandarin

3.2%

Hindi

2.8%

Greek

2.8%

German

2.8%

Italian

2.3%

Portuguese

2.3%

Arabic

2.3%

Swahili

1.8%

Cantonese

1.4%

Urdu

1.4%

Swedish

0.9%

Romanian

0.9%

Gujarati

0.9%

Carrier

0.9%

Tagalog

0.9%
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Examiner Education

Schools

University of Phoenix

21.1%

Weber State University

8.4%

Troy University

6.6%

Capella University

5.1%

Temple University

4.5%

Kaplan University

4.5%

Walden University

3.9%

Georgia State University

3.9%

George Mason University

3.9%

Liberty University

3.9%

Hofstra University

3.9%

New York University

3.6%

Miami Dade College

3.6%

University of Akron

3.3%

University of North Texas

3.3%

Michigan State University

3.3%

West Virginia University

3.3%

American InterContinental University

3.3%

Strayer University

3.3%

Ashford University

3.0%
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Majors

Business

20.9%

Accounting

9.5%

Medical Assisting Services

8.9%

Nursing

8.9%

Criminal Justice

4.5%

Finance

4.5%

Psychology

4.4%

Health Care Administration

4.3%

English

4.1%

Communication

3.9%

Education

3.7%

Management

3.3%

Law

3.0%

Political Science

2.7%

Medical Technician

2.7%

Marketing

2.3%

Journalism

2.3%

Liberal Arts

2.2%

Nursing Assistants

2.0%

General Studies

1.9%
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Degrees

Bachelors

31.7%

Other

24.8%

Masters

18.0%

Associate

11.1%

Certificate

6.3%

Doctorate

5.2%

Diploma

2.2%

License

0.6%
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Real Examiner Salaries

Job Title Company Location Start Date Salary
Supervising Examiner Accume Partners New York, NY Jun 12, 2016 $117,312
Fiancial Examiners Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics Deerfield, IL Sep 14, 2011 $112,944
Digital Evidence Examiner Transperfect Translations International, Inc. New York, NY Jul 16, 2012 $75,000
Risk Examiner Stripe, Inc. San Francisco, CA May 19, 2015 $73,154 -
$85,000
Digital Evidence Examiner Transperfect Translations International, Inc. New York, NY Aug 23, 2015 $65,000
ABL Examiner CBC Group, LLC Irving, TX Aug 20, 2016 $47,362
Subrogation Examiner Fiduciary Insurance Company of America Islandia, NY Apr 01, 2014 $47,000

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Top Skills for An Examiner

PhysicalExamsUrineSamplesEKGHealthHistoryFinancialStatementsWeightHeightCustomerServiceBloodPressureLifeInsurancePoliciesSafetyInsuranceCompaniesVitalSignsPhlebotomyAuditReportsDataEntryDisabilityBloodDrawsHazardousMaterialParamedicalExams

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Top Examiner Skills

  1. Physical Exams
  2. Urine Samples
  3. EKG
You can check out examples of real life uses of top skills on resumes here:
  • Worked independently performing health histories and physical exams.
  • Obtained medical history and verified patient information and vitals, height, weight and urine samples.
  • Conducted EKG's, vials, urine collections, body measurements, and venipuncture and full paramedical procedures.
  • Collected personal medical health history for insurance CO.
  • Analyzed financial statements of federally insured credit unions for adverse trends and developed solutions in collaboration with credit union management.

Top Examiner Employers

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Examiner Videos

NCUA: Day in the Life of a Credit Union Examiner

Pierce County Medical Examiner

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