Executive Directors of Operations are top management employees of a nonprofit. They manage the whole operations of the company. They set annual strategic goals to bring the company closer to its vision. They oversee all of the company's programs and ensure that these programs are in line with the company's vision and mission. They also ensure that the partnerships formed with other organizations remain strong. As leaders, they are expected to motivate and inspire the employees to work well together. Executive Directors of Operations represent the company in external events, industry functions, and other activities.

Executive Director Of Operations Responsibilities

Here are examples of responsibilities from real executive director of operations resumes representing typical tasks they are likely to perform in their roles.

  • Schedule, direct and authorize maintenance projects, ensuring reputable contractors used, costs manage and appropriate risk management procedures follow.
  • Manage the maintenance of the facility as well as equipment budgets and equipment procurement to maximize utilization and minimize relate expenses.
  • Design, implementation and parental oversight of local operational policies and processes.
  • Advance to increasingly responsible positions, culminating in management role with oversight of company operations.
  • Develop policies and procedures including: job descriptions, emergency procedures, inclement weather policy, and organizational development plan.
  • Reduce payroll costs; implement cross-training programs for better utilization of food and beverage personnel resulting in improve member satisfaction.
  • Manage the maintenance of the facility as well as equipment budgets and equipment procurement to maximize utilization and minimize relate expenses.
  • Coordinate search engine optimization (SEO) and compile quarterly reports on SEO performance.
  • Maintain the companies QuickBooks accounting program for accounts receivables and accounts payables.
  • Recruit initially to provide financial operational leadership, analysis capabilities and implementation of new ERP system.
Executive Director Of Operations Traits
Communication skills shows that you are able to relay your thoughts, opinions and ideas clearly to those around you.
Leadership skills directly correlate with a person's ability to lead others toward success or an accomplishment.
Management skills directly correlate with a person's ability to communicate and lead others while being able to solve problems..

Executive Director Of Operations Job Description

When it comes to understanding what an executive director of operations does, you may be wondering, "should I become an executive director of operations?" The data included in this section may help you decide. Compared to other jobs, executive directors of operations have a growth rate described as "as fast as average" at 6% between the years 2018 - 2028, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. In fact, the number of executive director of operations opportunities that are predicted to open up by 2028 is 150,600.

On average, the executive director of operations annual salary is $128,648 per year, which translates to $61.85 an hour. Generally speaking, executive directors of operations earn anywhere from $75,000 to $218,000 a year, which means that the top-earning executive directors of operations make $143,000 more than the ones at the lower end of the spectrum.

As is the case with most jobs, it takes work to become an executive director of operations. Sometimes people change their minds about their career after working in the profession. That's why we looked into some other professions that might help you find your next opportunity. These professions include an operations director, operations manager, managing director, and area director.

Executive Director Of Operations Jobs You Might Like

Executive Director Of Operations Resume Examples

Executive Director Of Operations Skills and Personality Traits

We calculated that 13% of Executive Directors Of Operations are proficient in Procedures, Operations Management, and Ensure Compliance. They’re also known for soft skills such as Communication skills, Leadership skills, and Management skills.

We break down the percentage of Executive Directors Of Operations that have these skills listed on their resume here:

  • Procedures, 13%

    Scheduled, directed and authorized maintenance projects, ensuring reputable contractors used, costs managed and appropriate risk management procedures followed.

  • Operations Management, 10%

    Experience in many aspects of operations management including Accounts receivable-payable.

  • Ensure Compliance, 8%

    Delivered training to ensure compliance with corporate systems, licensing requirements, accounting and contract standards.

  • Customer Service, 7%

    Monitor and evaluate daily operations in order to provide outstanding customer service and maintain customer loyalty while increasing profit margin.

  • Special Events, 7%

    Manage operational budgeting, site-based programming, special events and staff allocation to meet museum programming goals and requirements.

  • Financial Management, 6%

    Introduced financial management tools and taught entrepreneurial skills with NYU professor partnership.

"procedures," "operations management," and "ensure compliance" aren't the only skills we found executive directors of operations list on their resumes. In fact, there's a whole list of executive director of operations responsibilities that we found, including:

  • The most important skills for an executive director of operations to have in this position are communication skills. In this excerpt that we gathered from a executive director of operations resume, you'll understand why: "top executives must be able to communicate clearly and persuasively" According to resumes we found, communication skills can be used by a executive director of operations in order to "directed proper compliance controls, administrative and reporting procedures and communication systems to ensure financial strength and operating efficiency. "
  • Another commonly found skill for being able to perform executive director of operations duties is the following: leadership skills. According to a executive director of operations resume, "top executives must be able to lead an organization successfully by coordinating policies, people, and resources." Check out this example of how executive directors of operations use leadership skills: "salt lake city, utahstrategic leadership responsibilities over 4 diverse business units. "
  • Executive directors of operations are also known for management skills, which can be critical when it comes to performing their duties. An example of why this skill is important is shown by this snippet that we found in a executive director of operations resume: "top executives must shape and direct the operations of an organization" We also found this resume example that details how this skill is put to the test: "standardized leader development for over 13,000 employees through competent application of career management and professional development policies. "
  • A thorough review of lots of resumes revealed to us that "problem-solving skills" is important to completing executive director of operations responsibilities. This resume example shows just one way executive directors of operations use this skill: "top executives need to identify and resolve issues within an organization" Here's an example of how this skill is used from a resume that represents typical executive director of operations tasks: "developed and implemented all training programs for asp solutions, including application and train-the-trainer programs. "
  • Yet another important skill that an executive director of operations must demonstrate is "time-management skills." Top executives do many tasks at the same time, typically under their own direction, to ensure that their work gets done and that they meet their goals. This is clearly demonstrated in this example from an executive director of operations who stated: "applied dynamic leadership prioritization and project management skills toward consistently achieving critical deadlines while maintaining superior quality standards. "
  • See the full list of executive director of operations skills.

    Before becoming an executive director of operations, 63.0% earned their bachelor's degree. When it comes down to graduating with a master's degree, 19.6% executive directors of operations went for the extra education. If you're wanting to pursue this career, it may be possible to be successful with a high school degree. In fact, most executive directors of operations have a college degree. But about one out of every eight executive directors of operations didn't attend college at all.

    Those executive directors of operations who do attend college, typically earn either a business degree or a management degree. Less commonly earned degrees for executive directors of operations include a finance degree or a accounting degree.

    Once you've obtained the level of education you're comfortable with, you might start applying to companies to become an executive director of operations. We've found that most executive director of operations resumes include experience from Atria Senior Living, U.S. Bank, and USAA. Of recent, Atria Senior Living had 10 positions open for executive directors of operations. Meanwhile, there are 6 job openings at U.S. Bank and 6 at USAA.

    But if you're interested in companies where you might earn a high salary, executive directors of operations tend to earn the biggest salaries at Insmed, Sanford Health, and Bristol-Myers Squibb. Take Insmed for example. The median executive director of operations salary is $209,118. At Sanford Health, executive directors of operations earn an average of $179,803, while the average at Bristol-Myers Squibb is $170,813. You should take into consideration how difficult it might be to secure a job with one of these companies.

    View more details on executive director of operations salaries across the United States.

    We also looked into companies who hire executive directors of operations from the top 100 educational institutions in the U.S. The top three companies that hire the most from these institutions include United States Army, Bank of America, and Aramark.

    In general, executive directors of operations fulfill roles in the health care and technology industries. While employment numbers are high in those industries, the executive director of operations annual salary is the highest in the technology industry with $141,389 as the average salary. Meanwhile, the manufacturing and finance industries pay $133,193 and $132,828 respectively. This means that executive directors of operations who are employed in the technology industry make 25.5% more than executive directors of operations who work in the transportation Industry.

    The three companies that hire the most prestigious executive director of operationss are:

      What Operations Directors Do

      Operations directors oversee all company operations. They have the power to set the direction, change the course of the organization, and reform strategies to ensure efficiency in how the company operates. Operations directors manage business operations effectively by constantly analyzing company data and by anticipating any challenge that may come their way. As such, they make sound business decisions and recommendations that will help strengthen the organization. Operations directors oversee finances, quality control, and even human resources. They ensure that all aspects of the business are considered in making business operations decisions.

      In this section, we take a look at the annual salaries of other professions. Take operations director for example. On average, the operations directors annual salary is $23,660 lower than what executive directors of operations make on average every year.

      While their salaries may differ, one common ground between executive directors of operations and operations directors are a few of the skills required in each craft. In both careers, employees bring forth skills like procedures, ensure compliance, and customer service.

      There are some key differences in responsibilities as well. For example, an executive director of operations responsibilities require skills like "operations management," "special events," "risk management," and "action plans." Meanwhile a typical operations director has skills in areas such as "continuous improvement," "r," "product development," and "a/p." This difference in skills reveals how truly different these two careers really are.

      Operations directors receive the highest salaries in the insurance industry coming in with an average yearly salary of $93,598. But executive directors of operations are paid more in the technology industry with an average salary of $141,389.

      The education levels that operations directors earn is a bit different than that of executive directors of operations. In particular, operations directors are 9.0% less likely to graduate with a Master's Degree than an executive director of operations. Additionally, they're 0.8% less likely to earn a Doctoral Degree.

      What Are The Duties Of an Operations Manager?

      Operations managers are in charge of running the main business of the organization. They ensure that the business is running smoothly from an operations standpoint. They make sure that the processes in place produce the necessary output by implementing quality control measures. They also manage finances and ensure that there is enough budget to keep the operations of the business running. They also ensure that the production of goods or services is cost-efficient. Operations managers also handle people-related concerns. They are responsible for interviewing candidates, choosing the ones to hire, and ensuring that individuals assigned to operations are properly trained.

      Now we're going to look at the operations manager profession. On average, operations managers earn a $42,692 lower salary than executive directors of operations a year.

      While the salary may be different for these job positions, there is one similarity and that's a few of the skills needed to perform certain duties. We used info from lots of resumes to find that both executive directors of operations and operations managers are known to have skills such as "procedures," "customer service," and "oversight. "

      But both careers also use different skills, according to real executive director of operations resumes. While executive director of operations responsibilities can utilize skills like "operations management," "ensure compliance," "special events," and "financial management," some operations managers use skills like "facility," "continuous improvement," "powerpoint," and "loss prevention."

      It's been discovered that operations managers earn lower salaries compared to executive directors of operations, but we wanted to find out where operations managers earned the most pay. The answer? The technology industry. The average salary in the industry is $85,311. Additionally, executive directors of operations earn the highest paychecks in the technology with an average salary of $141,389.

      On the topic of education, operations managers earn lower levels of education than executive directors of operations. In general, they're 19.0% less likely to graduate with a Master's Degree and 0.8% less likely to earn a Doctoral Degree.

      How a Managing Director Compares

      A Managing Director oversees workflow and progress, making sure that all operations align within the company or organization's mission or set of goals. They are responsible for crafting strategies, devising effective business plans, and executing guidelines that would nurture a company's growth, and as well as to be the driving force that would direct employees to the company's objectives. Furthermore, a Managing Director must coordinate with those in a higher position, such as the members of the board.

      Let's now take a look at the managing director profession. On average, these workers make higher salaries than executive directors of operations with a $57,907 difference per year.

      Using executive directors of operations and managing directors resumes, we found that both professions have similar skills such as "customer service," "financial management," and "oversight," but the other skills required are very different.

      As mentioned, these two careers differ between other skills that are required for performing the work exceedingly well. For example, gathering from executive directors of operations resumes, they are more likely to have skills like "procedures," "operations management," "ensure compliance," and "special events." But a managing director might have skills like "healthcare," "portfolio," "financial services," and "client relationships."

      Managing directors make a very good living in the finance industry with an average annual salary of $198,652. Whereas executive directors of operations are paid the highest salary in the technology industry with the average being $141,389.

      When it comes to education, managing directors tend to earn similar education levels than executive directors of operations. In fact, they're 3.0% more likely to earn a Master's Degree, and 2.6% more likely to graduate with a Doctoral Degree.

      Description Of an Area Director

      Area directors oversee the operations of the company in a particular area. They manage the company's presence in their assigned area. Area directors come up with strategies so that their area meets company goals. They manage the company's performance in their area, from sales to marketing to finance to human resources. Area directors are expected to have in-depth knowledge of the situation and the context in the area they handle. They should be able to identify strengths and areas for improvement in their area. As such, they would be able to capitalize on their strengths and address their areas for improvement. Overall, area directors are responsible for the fulfillment of the company's vision in their area.

      Now, we'll look at area directors, who generally average a lower pay when compared to executive directors of operations annual salary. In fact, the difference is about $40,670 per year.

      While their salaries may vary, executive directors of operations and area directors both use similar skills to perform their jobs. Resumes from both professions include skills like "ensure compliance," "customer service," and "special events. "

      Each job requires different skills like "procedures," "operations management," "project management," and "strategic initiatives," which might show up on an executive director of operations resume. Whereas area director might include skills like "direct supervision," "revenue management," "intellectual disabilities," and "company standards."

      Area directors reach lower levels of education when compared to executive directors of operations. The difference is that they're 7.5% more likely to earn a Master's Degree less, and 0.0% more likely to graduate with a Doctoral Degree.