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Become A Highway Construction Inspector

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Working As A Highway Construction Inspector

  • Getting Information
  • Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Material
  • Evaluating Information to Determine Compliance with Standards
  • Documenting/Recording Information
  • Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge
  • Deal with People

  • Outdoors/walking/standing

  • Make Decisions

  • $63,730

    Average Salary

Example Of What A Highway Construction Inspector does

  • Total roadway reconstruction, bridges and culverts.
  • Conducted concrete testing as ordered by EIC.
  • Project Number; 31477; $19,011,416* Roadway construction project.
  • Certified in flagging and traffic control to assist in daily repairs of road ways and emergency operations.
  • Lay out and burn thermo on Rural/Interstate.07/2016 - 03/2017 Heavy Highway Construction Mid-AtlanticMaintanence
  • Implemented safety programs striving on personnel prevention awareness.
  • Moved back to Utah to find permanent employment.
  • Mentored junior team members, providing guidance on proper techniques and safety.
  • Monitored construction activities to ensure that environmental regulations were not violated.
  • Inspected drainage modification and installation.

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How To Become A Highway Construction Inspector

Most employers require construction and building inspectors to have at least a high school diploma and considerable knowledge of construction trades. Inspectors typically learn on the job. Many states and local jurisdictions require some type of license or certification.

Education

Most employers require inspectors to have at least a high school diploma, even for workers who have considerable related work experience.

Employers also seek candidates who have studied engineering or architecture or who have a certificate or an associate’s degree that includes courses in building inspection, home inspection, construction technology, and drafting. Many community colleges offer programs in building inspection technology. Courses in blueprint reading, vocational subjects, algebra, geometry, and writing are also useful. Courses in business management are helpful for those who plan to run their own inspection business.

A growing number of construction and building inspectors are entering the occupation with a bachelor’s degree, which can often substitute for related work experience.

Training

Training requirements vary by state, locality, and type of inspector. In general, construction and building inspectors receive much of their training on the job, although they must learn building codes and standards on their own. Working with an experienced inspector, they learn about inspection techniques; codes, ordinances, and regulations; contract specifications; and recordkeeping and reporting duties. Training also may include supervised onsite inspections.

Work Experience in a Related Occupation

Because inspectors must possess the right mix of technical knowledge, work experience, and education, employers prefer applicants who have both training and experience in a construction trade. For example, many inspectors have experience working as carpenters, electricians, or plumbers. Many home inspectors combine knowledge of multiple specialties, so many of them enter the occupation having a combination of certifications and previous experience in various construction trades.

Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations

Most states and local jurisdictions require construction and building inspectors to have a license or certification. Some states have individual licensing programs for construction and building inspectors. Others may require certification by associations such as the International Code Council, the International Association of Plumbing and Mechanical Officials, the International Association of Electrical Inspectors, and the National Fire Protection Association.

Similarly, most states require home inspectors to follow defined trade practices or obtain a state-issued license or certification. Currently, 36 states have policies regulating the conduct of home inspectors; a few states are considering adding licensure or certification requirements for home inspectors.

Home inspector license or certification requirements vary by state but may require that inspectors do the following:

  • Achieve a specified level of education
  • Possess experience with inspections
  • Maintain liability insurance
  • Pass an exam

The exam is often based on the American Society of Home Inspectors and National Association of Home Inspectors certification exams. Most inspectors must renew their license periodically and take continuing education courses.

Inspectors must have a valid driver’s license because they must travel to inspection sites.

Important Qualities

Communication skills. Inspectors must have good communication skills in order to explain any problems they find and to help people understand what is needed to fix the problems. In addition, they need to provide a written report of their findings.

Craft experience. Inspectors perform checks and inspections throughout the construction project. Experience in a related construction occupation provides inspectors with the necessary background to become certified.

Detail oriented. Inspectors must thoroughly examine many different construction activities, often at the same time. Therefore, they must pay close attention to detail so as to not overlook any items that need to be checked.

Mechanical knowledge. Inspectors use a variety of testing equipment as they check complex systems. In order to perform tests properly, they also must have detailed knowledge of how the systems operate.

Physical stamina. Inspectors are constantly on their feet and often must crawl through attics and other tight spaces. As a result, they should be somewhat physically fit.

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Highway Construction Inspector jobs

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Top Skills for A Highway Construction Inspector

SafetyRegulationsHighwayConstructionProceduresTrafficControlProjectNumberLinePaintingCulvertsEICIQBituminousOverlaysTopsoilMaterialsMPTEEgnatiaSuiteConstructionActivitiesRailPlacementSiteEngineermainEnsureComplianceStateDepartment

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Top Highway Construction Inspector Skills

  1. Safety Regulations
  2. Highway Construction
  3. Procedures
You can check out examples of real life uses of top skills on resumes here:
  • Lay out and burn thermo on Rural/Interstate.07/2016 - 03/2017 Heavy Highway Construction Mid-AtlanticMaintanence
  • Certified in flagging and traffic control to assist in daily repairs of road ways and emergency operations.
  • Project Number; 31477; $19,011,416* Roadway construction project.
  • Cleaned and cleared debris from culverts, catch basins, drop inlets, ditches, and other drain structures.
  • Conducted concrete testing as ordered by EIC.

Top Highway Construction Inspector Employers