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Become An Information Technology Auditor

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Working As An Information Technology Auditor

  • Getting Information
  • Evaluating Information to Determine Compliance with Standards
  • Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates
  • Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge
  • Analyzing Data or Information
  • Deal with People

  • Mostly Sitting

  • $69,000

    Average Salary

What Does An Information Technology Auditor Do At Freddie Mac

* Working with project team management in an advisory capacity to provide feedback on the design of controls and providing recommendations Confidently communicating control recommendations to the client Drafting final reports and participating in the reporting process Developing efficient review procedures and providing guidance to team members Conducting reviews of proposed control design and producing well-written work papers Leading various internal audit and client status meetings Providing useful performance feedback to audit staff and seniors Coaching and mentoring as well as reviewing the work of more junior IT auditors Providing clear and concise documentation Working independently with limited supervision Qualifications Minimum of 5 years of relevant IT and management experience to include at least four years of IT auditing or IT advisory experience in a large company or auditing firm, preferably within the financial services industry Bachelor s degree in Auditing, Management of Information Systems, Information Technology, Computer Science or Accounting with a focus on Accounting Systems or related discipline.
* CISA certification Sound technical knowledge covering multiple areas, such as IT project management, System Development Life Cycle (SDLC) reviews, IT security, change management, operations, software development, databases, mainframe, networks and operating systems Experienced in planning and executing risk-based IT audits or IT advisory projects Outstanding people, organizational as well as written and oral communication skills Knowledge of Sarbanes
* Oxley and COBIT and strong analytical skills Must work well in a team-oriented environment as well as independently Ability to relate highly technical concepts to managementPreferred Skills Advanced degree and professional certifications such as CISSP, CISM, PMP or CIA Knowledge of industry standards such as NIST, ISO, ITIL or ISF SGP is an asset Demonstrated ability to proactively improve internal audit processes Audit expertise in Unix, Mainframe (TSS), Windows, distributed databases, web technologies, enterprise architecture, virtualizationClosing StatementToday, Freddie Mac makes home possible for one in four home borrowers and is one of the largest sources of financing for multifamily housing.
* Join our smart, creative and dedicated team and you ll do important work for the housing finance system and make a difference in the lives of others.
* Freddie Mac is an equal opportunity and top diversity employer.
* EOE, M/F/D/V. Associated topics: district manager, editor in chief, fire captain, fire marshal, manager, petty officer, police captain, police commander, shift supervisor

What Does An Information Technology Auditor Do At CME Group

* Ability to multi-task and manage competing priorities
* Effectively partner with audit clients and members of the audit team to assess and prioritize risks and execute audit procedures
* Use strong analytical skills to conduct audits and assess technology and related operational risks
* Possess an understanding of general IT controls (system development life cycle, change management, information security, backup and recovery, monitoring, etc.), infrastructure (network, data center, etc.), operating systems, database administration, as well as practical audit experience executing audit programs
* Execute audit assignments in an efficient, timely, and professional manner in accordance with the Institute of Internal Auditors (IIA) standards
* Evaluate processes to determine adequacy of controls, compliance with policies and procedures, and comparison to leading practices
* Perform specific audit procedures, tests and analyses
* Create accurate, logical and detailed work-papers clearly describing the work performed, results of testing and conclusions reached
* Provide recommendations to management for strengthening controls, ensuring compliance with policies and procedures and enhancing operations
* Prepare comprehensive written and oral audit reports detailing the results of the audit
* Partner with more senior members of the team to work with management to develop acceptable solutions to address issues identified
* Execute follow-up work to ensure adequate remediation of gaps by management
* Establish a positive rapport with the Global Assurance team, management, and external auditors
* Perform other special projects as assigned

What Does An Information Technology Auditor Do At LP Search Partners

* Participate in all phases of IT audits in the Company's New York City Home Office, major data centers, field offices, and subsidiaries in the U
* S. and international locations.
* Technology audits are focused on infrastructure, application systems, IT general controls, and processes.
* Specific responsibilities include: Participate in planning, scoping and executing IT audits under the direction of the audit in-charge.
* This includes interviewing clients, participating in process walkthroughs, documenting and assessing risks and controls, assessing system configurations and access, and evaluating and validating the design and operating effectiveness of application and IT general controls.
* Communicate efficiently with clients during and between audits

What Does An Information Technology Auditor Do At Metlife

* Proactively advances integrated auditing concepts and use of technology by identifying application controls to mitigate the business risk associated with critical business processes.
* Closely follows latest industry trends and adapts them for testing.
* Directly manages multiple complex audits supporting different business segments and Plan Owners.
* Delivers high quality audit reports on time and communicates findings to business and IT management; responsible for compiling reports to and leading / participating in discussions with senior management.
* Recommends solutions to faulty systems and procedures and acts as a trusted advisor consulting throughout the implementation of those solutions.
* Advances the professional development of junior resources.
* Advancing the Internal Audit’s Vision of Auditor 2020

What Does An Information Technology Auditor Do At Coty Inc.

* performing both SOX and non
* SOX audits of business processes including but not limited to human resources, marketing, procurement, financial close, sales & distribution, manufacturing, inventory, and other corporate functions;
* developing an understanding of the organization as a whole, and specifically its key business processes;
* analyzing and documenting business process flows;
* developing and fostering strong professional relationships within company;
* building the department’s standing and credibility throughout the organization;
* taking a proactive role in departmental continuous improvement initiatives

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How To Become An Information Technology Auditor

Most accountants and auditors need at least a bachelor’s degree in accounting or a related field. Certification within a specific field of accounting improves job prospects. For example, many accountants become Certified Public Accountants (CPAs).  

Education

Most accountant and auditor positions require at least a bachelor’s degree in accounting or a related field. Some employers prefer to hire applicants who have a master’s degree, either in accounting or in business administration with a concentration in accounting.

A few universities and colleges offer specialized programs, such as a bachelor’s degree in internal auditing. In some cases, those with associate’s degrees, as well as bookkeepers and accounting clerks who meet the education and experience requirements set by their employers, get junior accounting positions and advance to accountant positions by showing their accounting skills on the job.

Many colleges help students gain practical experience through summer or part-time internships with public accounting or business firms.

Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations

Every accountant filing a report with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) is required by law to be a Certified Public Accountant (CPA). Many other accountants choose to become a CPA to enhance their job prospects or to gain clients. Many employers will often pay the costs associated with the CPA exam.

CPAs are licensed by their state’s Board of Accountancy. Becoming a CPA requires passing a national exam and meeting other state requirements. Almost all states require CPA candidates to complete 150 semester hours of college coursework to be certified, which is 30 hours more than the usual 4-year bachelor’s degree. Many schools offer a 5-year combined bachelor’s and master’s degree to meet the 150-hour requirement, but a master’s degree is not required.

A few states allow a number of years of public accounting experience to substitute for a college degree.

All states use the four-part Uniform CPA Examination from the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA). Candidates do not have to pass all four parts at once, but most states require that they pass all four parts within 18 months of passing their first part.

Almost all states require CPAs to take continuing education to keep their license.

Certification provides an advantage in the job market because it shows professional competence in a specialized field of accounting and auditing. Accountants and auditors seek certifications from a variety of professional societies. Some of the most common certifications are listed below:

The Institute of Management Accountants offers the Certified Management Accountant (CMA) to applicants who complete a bachelor’s degree. Applicants must have worked at least 2 years in management accounting, pass a two-part exam, agree to meet continuing education requirements, and comply with standards of professional conduct. The exam covers areas such as financial statement analysis, working-capital policy, capital structure, valuation issues, and risk management. 

The Institute of Internal Auditors (IIA) offers the Certified Internal Auditor (CIA) to graduates from accredited colleges and universities who have worked for 2 years as internal auditors and have passed a four-part exam. The IIA also offers the Certified in Control Self-Assessment (CCSA), Certified Government Auditing Professional (CGAP), Certified Financial Services Auditor (CFSA), and Certification in Risk Management Assurance (CRMA) to those who pass the exams and meet educational and experience requirements.

ISACA offers the Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA) to candidates who pass an exam and have 5 years of experience auditing information systems. Information systems experience, financial or operational auditing experience, or related college credit hours can be substituted for up to 3 years of experience in information systems auditing, control, or security.

For accountants with a CPA, the AICPA offers the option to receive any or all of the Accredited in Business Valuation (ABV), Certified Information Technology Professional (CITP), or Personal Financial Specialist (PFS) certifications. The ABV requires a written exam, completion of at least six business valuation projects, and 75 hours of continuing education. The CITP requires 1,000 hours of business technology experience and 75 hours of continuing education. Candidates for the PFS also must complete a certain amount of work experience and continuing education, and pass a written exam.

Advancement

Some top executives and financial managers have a background in accounting, internal auditing, or finance.

Beginning public accountants often advance to positions with more responsibility in 1 or 2 years and to senior positions within another few years. Those who excel may become supervisors, managers, or partners; open their own public accounting firm; or transfer to executive positions in management accounting or internal auditing in private firms.

Management accountants often start as cost accountants, junior internal auditors, or trainees for other accounting positions. As they rise through the organization, they may advance to accounting manager, chief cost accountant, budget director, or manager of internal auditing. Some become controllers, treasurers, financial vice presidents, chief financial officers, or corporation presidents.

Public accountants, management accountants, and internal auditors can move from one aspect of accounting and auditing to another. Public accountants often move into management accounting or internal auditing. Management accountants may become internal auditors, and internal auditors may become management accountants. However, it is less common for management accountants or internal auditors to move into public accounting.

Important Qualities

Analytical skills. Accountants and auditors must be able to identify issues in documentation and suggest solutions. For example, public accountants use analytical skills in their work to minimize tax liability, and internal auditors use these skills to detect fraudulent use of funds.  

Communication skills. Accountants and auditors must be able to listen carefully to facts and concerns from clients, managers, and others. They must also be able to discuss the results of their work in both meetings and written reports.

Detail oriented. Accountants and auditors must pay attention to detail when compiling and examining documentation.

Math skills. Accountants and auditors must be able to analyze, compare, and interpret facts and figures, although complex math skills are not necessary.

Organizational skills. Strong organizational skills are important for accountants and auditors who often work with a range of financial documents for a variety of clients.

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