An instrument and controls technician is responsible for checking and inspecting the condition of production equipment and machinery, ensuring its stability to support business functions and manufacturing processes. Instrument and control technicians study schematics and blueprints of system components to assemble parts and analyze its features for measurement. They also resolve system failures and write resolution reports to prevent the reoccurrence of downtime that may pose risks to the production, avoiding operational delays and potential hazards within the premises.

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Instrument And Controls Technician Responsibilities

Here are examples of responsibilities from real instrument and controls technician resumes representing typical tasks they are likely to perform in their roles.

  • Supervise and manage several environmental ECAS annual, monthly and weekly reports in cooperation with regional CEMS manager for federal compliance.
  • Project consist of two Siemens 501F gas turbines, one Siemens steam turbine, and a WDPF DCS.
  • Install and programme VFD's and Softstarts.
  • Build new operator panels for CNC controllers.
  • Develop new screens for the water treatment plants HMI's system.
  • Install, repair and replace electrical motors, VFD and motor controls.
  • Work from various heights via platforms, scaffolds, ladders or man-lifts.
  • Qualify and maintain electrical skills in accordance with OSHA low voltage standards.
  • Maintain GMP training necessary to perform work in a GMP regulate environment.
  • Train the SCADA operators to monitor and make changes to the process though SCADA.
  • Commission Siemens T3000 DCS including creating operator control interfaces, processing DCS change request.
  • Air, water, steam and oil pressure systems, volume, HVAC dampers systems.
  • Ensure proper calibration of emission monitors to comply with DHEC, EPA and OSHA regulations.
  • Lead CNC electrical wiring and primary testing for this recognize leader in robotic cutting systems.
  • Work side by side with commissioning agents to ensure each building meet certain leer standards.

Instrument And Controls Technician Job Description

Between the years 2018 and 2028, instrument and controls technician jobs are expected to undergo a growth rate described as "little or no change" at 0%, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. So if the thought "should I become an instrument and controls technician?" Has crossed your mind, maybe you should take the growth rate into account. In addition, the number of instrument and controls technician opportunities that are projected to become available by 2028 is 200.

On average, the instrument and controls technician annual salary is $64,516 per year, which translates to $31.02 an hour. Generally speaking, instrument and controls technicians earn anywhere from $48,000 to $86,000 a year, which means that the top-earning instrument and controls technicians make $45,000 more than the ones at the lower end of the spectrum.

Once you've become an instrument and controls technician, you may be curious about what other opportunities are out there. Careers aren't one size fits all. For that reason, we discovered some other jobs that you may find appealing. Some jobs you might find interesting include a technical testing engineer, engineering associate, assembly & test technician, and technician.

Learn More About Instrument And Controls Technician Job Descriptions

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5 Instrument And Controls Technician Resume Examples

Instrument And Controls Technician Skills and Personality Traits

We calculated that 12% of Instrument And Controls Technicians are proficient in Control Systems, Electrical Equipment, and Process Control. They’re also known for soft skills such as Color vision, Communication skills, and Physical strength.

We break down the percentage of Instrument And Controls Technicians that have these skills listed on their resume here:

  • Control Systems, 12%

    Set up/utilized testing equipment, performed testing on performance monitoring equipment, supervisory equipment and control systems.

  • Electrical Equipment, 7%

    Perform preventative and predictive maintenance on all electrical equipment.

  • Process Control, 5%

    Performed calibrations and troubleshooting of process control and measurement systems as relating to nuclear instrumentation and controls.

  • Preventative Maintenance, 4%

    Optimize plant preventative maintenance program to meet OEM recommendations, regulatory requirements, and corporate maintenance philosophy.

  • Test Equipment, 4%

    Coordinated and maintained all test equipment and reactor plant instrumentation in proper calibration and operational readiness as Divisional Instrumentation Technician.

  • Transmitters, 4%

    Pulled and corrected missing instrument wiring, Re-tubing incorrectly tubed process Flow Transmitters and Pressure Differential Transmitters.

"control systems," "electrical equipment," and "process control" aren't the only skills we found instrument and controls technicians list on their resumes. In fact, there's a whole list of instrument and controls technician responsibilities that we found, including:

  • Lastly, this career requires you to be skillful in "math skills." According to instrument and controls technician resumes, "electrical and electronics engineering technicians use math for analysis, design, and troubleshooting in their work." This resume example highlights how instrument and controls technician responsibilities rely on this skill: "interpret mathematical calculations pertaining to electrical equipment, instrument ranges, calibration errors and tolerances. "
  • See the full list of instrument and controls technician skills.

    Before becoming an instrument and controls technician, 24.7% earned their bachelor's degree. When it comes down to graduating with a master's degree, 4.0% instrument and controls technicians went for the extra education. If you're wanting to pursue this career, it may be possible to be successful with a high school degree. In fact, some instrument and controls technicians have a college degree. But about one out of every three instrument and controls technicians didn't attend college at all.

    Those instrument and controls technicians who do attend college, typically earn either electrical engineering degrees or electrical engineering technology degrees. Less commonly earned degrees for instrument and controls technicians include music degrees or electromechanical instrumentation and maintenance technologies/technicians degrees.

    Once you've obtained the level of education you're comfortable with, you might start applying to companies to become an instrument and controls technician. We've found that most instrument and controls technician resumes include experience from West Fraser, Jacobs Enterprises, and New York Power Authority. Of recent, West Fraser had 78 positions open for instrument and controls technicians. Meanwhile, there are 6 job openings at Jacobs Enterprises and 6 at New York Power Authority.

    Since salary is important to some instrument and controls technicians, it's good to note that they are figured to earn the highest salaries at Evonik, Intel, and The Coca-Cola Company. If you were to take a closer look at Evonik, you'd find that the average instrument and controls technician salary is $90,222. Then at Intel, instrument and controls technicians receive an average salary of $90,106, while the salary at The Coca-Cola Company is $88,541.

    View more details on instrument and controls technician salaries across the United States.

    Some other companies you might be interested in as a instrument and controls technician include United States Army Corps of Engineers, United States Marine, and Fluor. These three companies were found to hire the most instrument and controls technicians from the top 100 U.S. educational institutions.

    The three companies that hire the most prestigious instrument and controls technicians are:

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    What Technical Testing Engineers Do

    A technical testing engineer is responsible for inspecting and reporting the quality of products across the production cycle. You will thoroughly check procedures, materials, and electrical and mechanical systems to produce high-quality products for customers. Your main job is to test various components and features of the product to identify and resolve technical issues. Other duties include organizing and conducting training for junior team members, creating test environments, and identifying the root cause of technical issues.

    In this section, we compare the average instrument and controls technician annual salary with that of a technical testing engineer. Typically, technical testing engineers earn a $23,851 higher salary than instrument and controls technicians earn annually.

    While their salaries may differ, one common ground between instrument and controls technicians and technical testing engineers are a few of the skills required in each craft. In both careers, employees bring forth skills like preventative maintenance, transmitters, and plc.

    These skill sets are where the common ground ends though. An instrument and controls technician responsibility is more likely to require skills like "control systems," "electrical equipment," "process control," and "test equipment." Whereas a technical testing engineer requires skills like "test results," "schematics," "test procedures," and "test data." Just by understanding these different skills you can see how different these careers are.

    Technical testing engineers really shine in the automotive industry with an average salary of $93,229. Whereas instrument and controls technicians tend to make the most money in the energy industry with an average salary of $71,218.

    On average, technical testing engineers reach similar levels of education than instrument and controls technicians. Technical testing engineers are 0.4% less likely to earn a Master's Degree and 0.1% more likely to graduate with a Doctoral Degree.

    What Are The Duties Of an Engineering Associate?

    An engineering associate is a professional whose job duties include analysis of project plans, development of product designs, and maintenance of equipment. The engineering fields where an engineering associate can find a job include civil, mechanical, and environmental. The requirements to qualify for the position include obtaining a bachelor's degree in engineering, familiarity with a specific industry, prior work experience related to the field, and possessing strong technical skills.

    The next role we're going to look at is the engineering associate profession. Typically, this position earns a higher pay. In fact, they earn a $6,141 higher salary than instrument and controls technicians per year.

    While the salary may be different for these job positions, there is one similarity and that's a few of the skills needed to perform certain duties. We used info from lots of resumes to find that both instrument and controls technicians and engineering associates are known to have skills such as "control systems," "preventative maintenance," and "test equipment. "

    While some skills are similar in these professions, other skills aren't so similar. For example, several resumes showed us that instrument and controls technician responsibilities requires skills like "electrical equipment," "process control," "electrical systems," and "hand tools." But an engineering associate might use skills, such as, "python," "java," "cad," and "c++."

    Engineering associates may earn a higher salary than instrument and controls technicians, but engineering associates earn the most pay in the energy industry with an average salary of $88,950. On the other side of things, instrument and controls technicians receive higher paychecks in the energy industry where they earn an average of $71,218.

    On the topic of education, engineering associates earn higher levels of education than instrument and controls technicians. In general, they're 5.3% more likely to graduate with a Master's Degree and 0.1% more likely to earn a Doctoral Degree.

    How an Assembly & Test Technician Compares

    An assembly test technician works at manufacturing facilities where they are in charge of assembling product components and subjecting them to various tests, ensuring compliance with standards and regulations. Although the extent of their responsibilities depends on their organization of employment, it usually includes understanding diagrams and project requirements, establishing and implementing test parameters, operating tools and equipment, maintaining records, and producing detailed reports. There are also times when they must coordinate with quality control teams, working together in a joint effort to improve production processes and results.

    The assembly & test technician profession generally makes a lower amount of money when compared to the average salary of instrument and controls technicians. The difference in salaries is assembly & test technicians making $25,742 lower than instrument and controls technicians.

    While looking through the resumes of several instrument and controls technicians and assembly & test technicians we discovered that both professions have similar skills. These similarities include skills such as "transmitters," "plc," and "hand tools," but they differ when it comes to other required skills.

    As mentioned, these two careers differ between other skills that are required for performing the work exceedingly well. For example, gathering from instrument and controls technicians resumes, they are more likely to have skills like "control systems," "electrical equipment," "process control," and "preventative maintenance." But a assembly & test technician might have skills like "mechanical assembly," "aerospace," "dexterity," and "calipers."

    Interestingly enough, assembly & test technicians earn the most pay in the transportation industry, where they command an average salary of $47,194. As mentioned previously, instrument and controls technicians highest annual salary comes from the energy industry with an average salary of $71,218.

    Assembly & test technicians are known to earn similar educational levels when compared to instrument and controls technicians. Additionally, they're 3.3% less likely to graduate with a Master's Degree, and 0.0% less likely to earn a Doctoral Degree.

    Description Of a Technician

    Technicians are skilled professionals who primarily work with technology in different industries. They are knowledgeable about the technical aspects of the various items they work with. They are usually working with electricity or with technological advancements. Technicians may be assigned to do the construction of equipment or materials related to their field of study. They may also be assigned to conduct diagnostics and other maintenance activities to ensure that the equipment works properly. Technicians may also be required to conduct basic repairs in case of problems. It is important that technicians have good analytical skills and decision-making skills.

    Technicians tend to earn a lower pay than instrument and controls technicians by about $26,471 per year.

    While both instrument and controls technicians and technicians complete day-to-day tasks using similar skills like preventative maintenance, test equipment, and plc, the two careers also vary in other skills.

    Each job requires different skills like "control systems," "electrical equipment," "process control," and "transmitters," which might show up on an instrument and controls technician resume. Whereas technician might include skills like "patients," "customer service," "patient care," and "diagnosis."

    In general, technicians make a higher salary in the telecommunication industry with an average of $46,660. The highest instrument and controls technician annual salary stems from the energy industry.

    The average resume of technicians showed that they earn similar levels of education to instrument and controls technicians. So much so that the likelihood of them earning a Master's Degree is 1.0% less. Additionally, they're more likely to earn a Doctoral Degree by 0.4%.