Intel Company History Timeline

(6,091 Jobs)
1968

Robert Noyce and Gordon Moore incorporated their new venture on July 18, 1968

Robert Noyce and Gordon Moore were already Silicon Valley legends when they founded Intel in 1968.

In 1968, Noyce and Moore resigned from Fairchild.

Intel's original business plan, 1968, hand typed by Robert Noyce

Robert Noyce, 1968, Intel co-founder

Gordon Moore, 1968, Intel co-founder

The company was founded by Robert Norton Noyce and Gordon Earle Moore in 1968 and is headquartered in Santa Clara, CA.“

Intel was originally founded in Mountain View, California in 1968 by Gordon E. Moore (of “Moore’s Law” fame, a chemist and physicist), Robert Noyce (a physicist and co-inventor of the integrated circuit), Arthur Rock (investor and venture capitalist), and Max Palevsky.

In 1968, Robert Noyce and Gordon Moore were two unhappy engineers working for the Fairchild Semiconductor Company who decided to quit and create their own company at a time when many Fairchild employees were leaving to create start-ups.

The company was established in 1968 by Robert N. Noyce, cofounder of the integrated circuit, and Gordon E. Moore, a colleague of Noyce’s from Fairchild Semiconductor, to make semiconductor memory more practical and affordable.

While at Fairchild, Noyce and Moore invented the integrated circuit, and, in 1968, they decided to form their own company.

1968: Robert Noyce and Gordon Moore incorporate N M Electronic s, which is soon renamed Intel Corporation.

1969

In 1969, Intel released the world's first metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) static ram, the 1101.

Also in 1969, Intel's first money-making product was the 3101 Schottky bipolar 64-bit static random access memory (SRAM) chip.

In late 1969, when a Japanese calculator manufacturer, Busicom, asked the new company to design 12 custom chips for one of its products, the innovative Intel team came up with a groundbreaking solution: one chip that could do the work of 12.

The 3101 proved popular enough to sustain the company until the 1101, a metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) chip, was perfected and introduced in 1969.

1970

A year later in 1970, Intel introduced the 1103 DRAM memory chip.

1970: Company develops DRAM, dynamic RAM.

1971

In 1971, Intel introduced the now-famous world's first single chip microprocessor (the computer on a chip)—the Intel 4004—invented by Intel engineers Federico Faggin, Ted Hoff, and Stanley Mazor.

The company's most dramatic impact on the computer industry involved its 1971 introduction of the 4004, the world's first microprocessor.

At its introduction in 1971, EPROM was a novelty without much of a market.

1971: Intel introduces the world's first microprocessor and goes public.

1972

In 1972, Intel introduced the first 8-bit microprocessor—the 8008.

1974

In 1974, the Intel 8080 microprocessor was introduced with ten times the power of the 8008.

The 8080, introduced in 1974, was the first truly general purpose microprocessor.

1974: Company introduces the first general purpose microprocessor.

The 8080, intr oduced in 1974, was the first truly general purpose microprocessor.

1974: Company introduces the first general purpose microproces sor (the 8080).

1975

In 1975, the 8080 microprocessor was used in one of the first consumer home computers, the Altair 8800 which was sold in kit form.

1976

In 1976, Intel introduced the 8748 and 8048, the first type of microcontroller i.e. a computer-on-a-chip optimized to control electronic devices.

1978

The 8086 was introduced in 1978 but took two years to achieve wide use, and, during this time, Motorola produced a competing chip (the 68000) that seemed to be selling faster.

The 8086 was introduced in 1978 but to ok two years to achieve wide use, and, during this time, Motorola, In c. produced a competing chip (the 68000) that seemed to be selling fa ster.

1980

In 1980, the 4004 was followed by the 8080, which was chosen as the central processing unit of IBM’s first personal computer.

One of Intel's most important developments in peripherals was the coprocessor, first introduced in 1980.

In an interview with the Harvard Business Review in 1980, Noyce remarked on the company's hiring policy, stating, 'we expect people to work hard.

1980: IBM chooses the Intel microprocessor for the first personal computer.

One of In tel's most important developments in peripherals was the coprocessor, first introduced in 1980.

1981

Such measures were not popular among all its workforce, but, by June 1983, all cuts had been restored and retroactive raises had been made. Thus, in 1981, when economic struggles again surfaced, instead of laying off more employees, Intel accelerated new product development with the '125 Percent Solution,' which asked exempt employees to work two extra hours per day, without pay, for six months.

1982

Moreover, in December 1982, IBM paid $250 million for a 12 percent share of Intel, giving the company not only a strong capital boost, but also strong ties to the undisputed industry leader.

1983

Such measures were not popular among all its workforce, but, by June 1983, all cuts had been restored and retroactive raises had been made.

Such measures were not po pular among all its workforce, but, by June 1983, all cuts had been r estored and retroactive raises had been made.

In 1983, Esquire commissioned journalist Tom Wolfe to write a piece on Robert Noyce for its anniversary issue.

Fab 7, Intel's seventh wafer-fabrication plant, opened in 1983 only to face two years of troubled operations before reaching full capacity.

1983: Revenues exceed $1 billion for the first time.

Fab 7, Intel's seventh wafer-fabrication plant, opened in 1983 only to face two years of troubled operations before reachin g full capacity.

1987

IBM would eventually increase its stake to 20 percent before selling its Intel stock in 1987.

IBM would eventually increase its s take to 20 percent before selling its Intel stock in 1987.

1988

While competitors claimed that Intel simply gave away its DRAM market, Moore told Business Week in 1988 that the company deliberately focused on microprocessors as the least cyclical field in which to operate.

While competitors claimed that Intel simp ly gave away its DRAM market, Moore told Business Week in 1988 that the company deliberately focused on microprocessors as the leas t cyclical field in which to operate.

1989

In 1989 Intel introduced the 80486, a chip Business Week heralded as 'a veritable mainframe-on-a-chip.' The 486 included 1.2 million transistors and the first built-in math coprocessor, and was 50 times faster than the 4004, the first microprocessor.

A new chip, the 64-bit i860 announced in early 1989, however, did make use of RISC technology to offer what Intel claimed would be a 'supercomputer on a chip.'

In 1989 Intel introduced the 80486, a chip Business Week heral ded as "a veritable mainframe-on-a-chip." The 486 included 1.2 millio n transistors and the first built-in math coprocessor, and was 50 tim es faster than the 4004, the first microprocessor.

A new chip, the 64-bit i860 announc ed in early 1989, however, did make use of RISC technology to offer w hat Intel claimed would be a "supercomputer on a chip."

1992

Intel's annual net income topped $1 billion for the first time in 1992, following a very successful, brand-building marketing campaign.

In 1992, the company's Intel Products Group introduced network, communications, and personal conferencing products for retail sale directly to PC users.

1992: Net income tops $1 billion for the first time.

In 1992 the company's Intel Products Group introduced network, communications, and personal conferencing products for retai l sale directly to PC users.

1993

Though produced by the USA’s Intel Corporation, the 1993 Pentium was basically the outcome of research conducted by an Indian engineer.

The Federal Trade Commission conducted a two-year investigation of Intel's practices and did not recommend criminal charges against the company, but two rival companies--Advanced Micro Devices Inc. and Cyrix Corp.--filed antitrust lawsuits against Intel in 1993.

In 1993 Intel released its fifth-generation Pentium processor, a trademarked chip capable of executing over 100 million instructions per second (MIPS) and supporting, for example, real-time video communication.

1993: The fifth generation chip, the Pentium, debuts.

The Feder al Trade Commission conducted a two-year investigation of Intel's pra ctices and did not recommend criminal charges against the company, bu t two rival companies, Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. (AMD) and Cyrix C orporation, filed antitrust lawsuits against Intel in 1993.

In 1993 Intel released its fifth-generation Pentium processor, a trad emarked chip capable of executing over 100 million instructions per s econd (MIPS) and supporting, for example, real-time video communicati on.

1995

In 1995 the Pentium Pro hit the market sporting 5.5 million transistors and capable of performing up to 300 MIPS. Intel next added MMX technology to its existing line of Pentium processors.

In 1995 the Pentium Pro hit the market s porting 5.5 million transistors and capable of performing up to 300 M IPS. Intel next added MMX technology to its existing line of Pentium processors.

1996

Fueled by exploding demand, revenues hit $20.85 billion by 1996, while net income soared to $5.16 billion.

1996: Revenues surpass $20 billion, net income exceeds $5 billion.

1996: Revenues surpass $20 billion, net income exceeds  6;5 billion.

1997

In 1997, Time magazine named Intel CEO Andy Grove its Man of the Year.

With the following year came the launch of the Celeron processor, which was designed specifically for the value PC desktop sector, a rapidly growing segment of the market ever since the early 1997 debut of a sub-$1,000 PC from Compaq.

With the following year came the launch of the Celeron process or, which was designed specifically for the value PC desktop sector, a rapidly growing segment of the market ever since the early 1997 deb ut of a sub-$1,000 PC from Compaq.

1998

The fierce competit ion from AMD prompted Intel to initiate a brutal price war, which cut both revenues and profits, and it also slashed Intel's worldwide sha re of the microprocessor market to below 80 percent, compared to the 86.7 percent figure from 1998.

1999

Intel also entered the market for e-commerce services, rapidly building up the largest business-to-business e-commerce site in the world, with $1 billion per month in online sales by mid-1999.

Intel also entered the market for e-commerce services, rapidly building up the l argest business-to-business e-commerce site in the world, with $1 billion per month in online sales by mid-1999.

2000

After 2000, growth in demand for high-end microprocessors slowed.

2000: The first Intel 1-gigahertz processor hits the market.

The new product launches continued in 2000, but they were accompanied by an uncharacteristic series of blunders.

The profits of $7.52 billion were an impressi ve 33 percent higher than the previous year but below the peak reache d in 2000.

2003

The first fruit of this endeavor was Centrino, launched in early 2003.

2005

In May 2005 Otellini became only the fifth CEO in Intel history and t he first non-engineer.

In 2005, CEO Paul Otellini reorganized the company to refocus its core processor and chipset business on platforms (enterprise, digital home, digital health, and mobility).

2006

Intel’s groundbreaking achievements continue in the new century.In January 2006, the company announced it had designed what is believed to be the fi rst fully functional SRAM (static random access memory) chip using 45-nanometer (nm) logic technology.

On June 27, 2006, the sale of Intel’s XScale assets was announced.

The move was intended to permit Intel to focus its resources on its core x86 and server businesses, and the acquisition completed on November 9, 2006.

2008

In 2008, Intel spun off key assets of a solar startup business effort to form an independent company, SpectraWatt Inc.

2010

On August 19, 2010, Intel announced that it planned to purchase McAfee, a manufacturer of computer security technology.

On August 30, 2010, Intel and Infineon Technologies announced that Intel would acquire Infineon’s Wireless Solutions business.

2011

On January 26, 2011, the European Union approved the acquisition, after Intel agreed to provide rival security firms with all necessary information that would allow their products to use Intel’s chips and personal computers.

In March 2011, Intel bought most of the assets of Cairo-based SySDSoft.

April 2011: Intel began a pilot project with ZTE Corporation to produce smartphones using the Intel Atom processor for China’s domestic market.

In July 2011, Intel announced that it had agreed to acquire Fulcrum Microsystems Inc., a company specializing in network switches.The company was previously included on the EE Times list of 60 Emerging Startups.

On October 1, 2011, Intel reached a deal to acquire Telmap, an Israeli-based navigation software company.

December 2011: Intel announced that it reorganized several of its business units to form a new mobile and communications group.

The purchase price was $7.68 billion, and the companies said that if the deal were approved, new products would be released early in 2011.

However, as of 2011, SpectraWatt has filed for bankruptcy.

2013

In July 2013, Intel confirmed the acquisition of Omek Interactive, an Israeli company that makes technology for gesture-based interfaces, without disclosing the monetary value of the deal.

As of July 2013, five companies will use Intel’s fabs via the Intel Custom Foundry division: Achronix, Tabula, Netronome, Microsemi, and Altera—most are FPGA makers, but Netronome designs network processors.

The acquisition of a Spanish natural language recognition startup named Indisys was announced on September 13, 2013.

The Alliance for Affordable Internet (A4AI) was launched in October 2013 and Intel is part of the coalition of public and private organisations that also includes Facebook, Google, and Microsoft.

Finding itself with excess fab capacity after the failure of the Ultrabook to gain market traction and with PC sales declining, in 2013 Intel reached a foundry agreement to produce chips for Altera using 14-nm process.

Founded
1968
Company Founded
Headquarters
Santa Clara, CA
Company Headquarter
Founders
Gordon Moore,Robert Noyce,Michael Harris,Srikanth Tirumala
Company Founders

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