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Become A Jet Aircraft Servicer

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Working As A Jet Aircraft Servicer

  • Getting Information
  • Documenting/Recording Information
  • Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Material
  • Evaluating Information to Determine Compliance with Standards
  • Repairing and Maintaining Mechanical Equipment
  • Stressful

  • Make Decisions

  • $58,370

    Average Salary

What Does A Jet Aircraft Servicer Do At L3 Technologies

* wing walker, brake rider, tug driver, and tow team supervisor.
* Vacuums and cleans aircraft and aircraft transparencies.
* Performs all tasks associated with ground movement of aircraft to include marshalling.
* Performs pre-flights and thru-flights.
* May volunteer to perform BPO inspections when approved by Management.
* Annotates maintenance actions in aircraft records and is knowledgeable in IMDS documentation.
* Records maintenance actions in aircraft records and completes associated documentation as necessary.
* Removes and reinstalls panels.
* Must promote Company values, policies, and standards of conduct.
* Practices good housekeeping, tool control, FOD awareness/prevention, and safety at all times.
* Must be customer oriented and ensure professional coordination with Operations and other base agencies.
* Shall assist other personnel and work centers as directed.
* Must be able to work day shift, night shift, or weekend duty.
* Shall perform other assigned duties to include TDY and travel.
* LI-JO2
* IND
* Qualifications

What Does A Jet Aircraft Servicer Do At L3 Technologies

* _
* Launch and recover aircraft in accordance with specific guidelines during day and night hours.
* Perform aircraft inspections in accordance with published criteria.
* Perform fueling operations using gravity fill and closed circuit refueling methods.
* Service engine oil and hydraulic systems as required.
* Act as a member of an aircraft moving crew when directed.
* Perform aircraft washing and lubrication when assigned.
* Act as a member of the engine rinse team when directed.
* Be familiar with and operate portable fire fighting equipment.
* Use provided safety equipment when working with hazardous materials.
* Maintain cleanliness of the work center and around your assigned work area.
* Responsible for adhering to all applicable Foreign Object Damage (FOD) prevention rules and regulations.
* Responsible for the adhering to the Company Tool Control Program.
* Must comply with established General and Industrial Safety Rules and Regulations as applicable to the contract, facilities and job assignment.
* Maintain appropriate records of all work accomplished.
* May be required to perform off-site service on assigned detachments.
* May be required to perform simple computer input functions.
* Pursuant to the specific provisions of the CBA, at the discretion of management, may be requested to perform the duties of Lead.
* When assigned to outlying fields:
* Maintain a communications link with line supervisory personnel and the on-site crash crew.
* May be required to remove and reinstall aircraft doors for specific outlying field operations.
* Provide gravity and hot fueling services at outlying fields when assigned.
* Assist when directed to ensure safety, security and preservation of Government owned and Company owned equipment.
* Perform other reasonably related incidental duties when directed within the job classification

What Does A Jet Aircraft Servicer Do At L3 Technologies

* wing walker, brake rider, tug driver, and tow team supervisor.
* Vacuums and cleans aircraft and aircraft transparencies.
* Performs all tasks associated with ground movement of aircraft to include marshalling.
* Performs pre-flights and thru-flights.
* May volunteer to perform BPO inspections when approved by Management.
* Annotates maintenance actions in aircraft records and is knowledgeable in IMDS documentation.
* Records maintenance actions in aircraft records and completes associated documentation as necessary.
* Removes and reinstalls panels.
* Must promote Company values, policies, and standards of conduct.
* Practices good housekeeping, tool control, FOD awareness/prevention, and safety at all times.
* Must be customer oriented and ensure professional coordination with Operations and other base agencies.
* Shall assist other personnel and work centers as directed.
* Must be able to work day shift, night shift, or weekend duty.
* Shall perform other assigned duties to include TDY and travel.
* LI-MN1
* IND
* Qualifications
* A minimum of one year recent hands-on aircraft maintenance experience on the specific aircraft or any assigned MDS.
* Personnel with recent experience as an aircraft mechanic do not require specific aircraft experience.
* Maintenance experience includes aircraft towing, aircraft washing, and aircraft corrosion control.
* A working knowledge of mechanical tools is required.
* High school diploma or the equivalent is required.
* Must be able to read, write, speak, and understand English.
* Previous employment in mechanical or technical capacity is required.
* Stable employment history is required.
* Potential to progress to advanced positions based on enthusiasm, aptitude, self-improvement efforts, and attitude.
* Must be able to obtain and maintain a flight line driver's license and may be required to obtain and maintain a class CDL.
* Physical exertion requirement is medium.
* Must be able to climb ladders, stairs and portable stands and navigate these without assistance.
* Must be able to work at heights 70 feet above the ground.
* Must be able to work in extreme heat/cold.
* Must be able to work in the following environmental conditions: noise, vibration, proximity to moving mechanical parts, moving vehicles, electrical current, chemicals, odors, dust.
* Must be able to bend, reach, stoop, balance, push, pull, kneel, grasp, crouch, crawl, work in narrow aisles/passageways, and work in close spaces that restrict movement including aircraft fuel tanks for extended periods of time.
* Must be able to stand for sustained periods of time.
* Must be able to work primarily with fingers such as picking, pinching, typing.
* Must have close visual acuity to perform an activity such as: preparing and analyzing data and figures; transcribing; viewing a computer terminal; extensive reading; visual inspection involving small defects, small parts, and/or operation of machines (including inspection); using measurement devices; and/or assembly or fabrication parts at distances close to the eyes.
* Must be capable of routinely performing industry standard ambidextriosities required to complete tasks.
* Must be able to lift/maneuver up to 50 pounds
* Must be able and willing to enter and work in confined spaces, such as aircraft fuel tanks and beneath floor panels with clearances of 18” – 24”.
* Equal Opportunity Employer-minorities/females/veterans/individuals with disabilities/sexual orientation/gender identity.
* Job
* Assembly
* Primary Location
* USA-Mississippi
* Columbus AFB

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How To Become A Jet Aircraft Servicer

Many aircraft and avionics equipment mechanics and technicians learn their trade at an FAA-approved aviation maintenance technician school. Others enter with a high school education or equivalent and are trained on the job. Some workers enter the occupation after getting training in the military. Aircraft mechanics and avionics technicians typically are certified by the FAA. See Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) part 65, subparts D and E, for the most current requirements for becoming a certified mechanic.

Education and Training

Aircraft mechanics and service technicians often enter the occupation after attending a Part 147 FAA-approved aviation maintenance technician school. These schools award a certificate of completion that the FAA recognizes as an alternative to the experience requirements stated in regulations. The schools also grant holders the right to take the relevant FAA exams.

Some aircraft mechanics and service technicians enter the occupation with a high school diploma or equivalent and receive on-the-job training to learn their skills and to be able to pass the FAA exams. Other workers enter the occupation after getting training in the military. Aviation maintenance personnel who are not certified by the FAA work under supervision until they have enough experience and knowledge and become certified.

Avionics technicians typically earn an associate’s degree before entering the occupation. Aircraft controls, systems, and flight instruments have become increasingly digital and computerized. Maintenance workers who have the proper background in aviation flight instruments or computer repair are needed to maintain these complex systems.

Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations

Although aircraft and avionics equipment mechanics and technicians are not required to get licenses or certifications, most do, because these credentials often improve a mechanic’s wages and chances for employment. The FAA requires that aircraft maintenance be done either by a certified mechanic with the appropriate ratings or authorizations or under the supervision of such a mechanic.

The FAA offers separate certifications for bodywork (Airframe mechanics, or “A”) and engine work (Powerplant mechanics, or “P”), but employers may prefer to hire mechanics who have both Airframe and Powerplant (A&P) ratings. The A&P ratings generally certify that aviation mechanics meet basic knowledge and ability standards.

Mechanics must be at least 18 years of age, be fluent in English, and have 30 months of experience to qualify for either the A or the P rating or both (the A&P rating). If only one rating is sought by the mechanic, 18 months’ experience is required to take either the Airframe or the Powerplant exam. However, completion of a program at a Part 147 FAA-approved aviation maintenance technician school can substitute for the experience requirement and shorten the time requirements for becoming eligible to take the FAA exams.

Applicants must pass written, oral, and practical exams that demonstrate the required skills. Candidates must pass all the tests within a timeframe of 2 years.

To keep their certification, mechanics must have completed relevant repair or maintenance work within the previous 24 months. To fulfill this requirement, mechanics may take classes from their employer, a school, or an aircraft manufacturer.

Avionics technicians typically are certified through a repair station for the specific work being done, or else they hold the Airframe rating to work on an aircraft’s electronic and flight instrument systems. An Aircraft Electronics Technician (AET) certification is available through the National Center for Aerospace & Transportation Technologies (NCATT). It certifies that aviation mechanics have a basic level of knowledge in the subject area, but it is not required by the FAA for any specific tasks. Avionics technicians who work on communications equipment may need to have the proper radiotelephone operator certification issued by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC).

Other licenses and certifications are available to mechanics who wish to increase their skill set or advance their careers. The Inspection Authorization (IA) is available to mechanics who have had their A&P ratings for at least 3 years and meet other requirements. These mechanics are able to sign off on many major repairs and alterations. Mechanics can get numerous other certifications, such as Repairmen of light-sport aircraft and Designated Airworthiness Representative (DAR).

Important Qualities

Strength and agility. Mechanics and technicians may need to carry or move heavy equipment or aircraft parts. They may need to climb on airplanes, balance, and reach without falling.

Detail oriented. Mechanics and technicians need to adjust airplane parts to exact specifications. For example, they often use precision tools to tighten wheel bolts to an exact tension.

Dexterity. Mechanics and technicians must possess dexterity to coordinate the movement of their fingers and hands in order to grasp, manipulate, or assemble parts.

Observational skills. Mechanics and technicians must recognize engine noises, read gauges, and collect other information to determine whether an aircraft’s systems are working properly.

Troubleshooting skills. Mechanics and technicians diagnose complex problems, and they need to evaluate options to correct those problems.

Work Experience in a Related Occupation

Avionics technicians may begin their careers as aircraft mechanics and service technicians. As aircraft mechanics and service technicians gain experience, they may study independently, attend formal classes, or otherwise choose to pursue additional certifications that grant privileges to work on specialized flight instruments. Eventually, they may become dedicated avionics technicians who work exclusively on flight instruments.

Advancement

As aircraft mechanics gain experience, they may advance to lead mechanic, lead inspector, or shop supervisor. Opportunities are best for those who have an inspection authorization (IA). Many specialist certifications are available that allow mechanics to do a wider variety of repairs and alterations.

Mechanics with broad experience in maintenance and repair might become inspectors or examiners for the FAA.

Additional business and management training may help aircraft and avionics equipment mechanics and technicians open their own maintenance facility.

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Jet Aircraft Servicer jobs

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Jet Aircraft Servicer Demographics

Gender

  • Male

    75.2%
  • Female

    23.8%
  • Unknown

    1.0%

Ethnicity

  • White

    73.1%
  • Hispanic or Latino

    17.6%
  • Asian

    6.1%
  • Unknown

    2.6%
  • Black or African American

    0.5%
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Languages Spoken

  • French

    50.0%
  • Spanish

    50.0%

Jet Aircraft Servicer

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Jet Aircraft Servicer Education

Jet Aircraft Servicer

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Top Skills for A Jet Aircraft Servicer

SafetyMeasuresAircraftCargoFlightLineServicesAircraftServicerMilitaryAircraftHazardousMaterialsEquipmentCorrosionControlFODDODGroundSupportEquipmentClearanceLiquidOxygenNecessaryAmountC-17ApplicableMaintenanceRequirementSecretServiceAircraftMaintenanceHandToolsHandSignalsLogistics

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Top Jet Aircraft Servicer Skills

  1. Safety Measures
  2. Aircraft Cargo
  3. Flight Line Services
You can check out examples of real life uses of top skills on resumes here:
  • Provided flight line services in support of scheduled flight operation to include inspections, servicing cleaning, launching and recovering.
  • Received and processed general and special handling cargo, including explosives and hazardous materials.
  • Loaded and off-loaded cargo from DoD and commercial aircraft.
  • Ensured all cargo documentation, packaging, labeling and marking requirements, and border clearance requirements have been met.
  • Service fuel, hydraulics, liquid oxygen, accumulators, tires, engines, AMAD and VIN systems.

Top Jet Aircraft Servicer Employers

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