FIND PERSONALIZED JOBS
Sign up to Zippia and discover your career options with your personalized career search.
×
FIND
PERSONALIZED JOBS

Log In

Log In to Save

Sign Up to Save

Sign Up to Dismiss

Sign Up

or

The email and password you specified are invalid. Please, try again.

User already exist with emailId.

Email and password are mandatory

Forgot Password?

Don't have an account? Sign Up

reset password

Enter your email address and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Back to Log In

Log In

Log In to Save

Sign Up to Save

Sign Up to Dismiss

Sign up to save the job and get personalized job recommendations.

or

The email and password you specified are invalid. Please, try again.

Email and password are mandatory

Already Have An Account? Log in

reset password

Enter your email address and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Back to Log In

Job Saved

See your Saved Jobs now

or

find more interesting jobs in

Job Dismissed

Find better matching jobs in

Working As A Justice

  • Getting Information
  • Evaluating Information to Determine Compliance with Standards
  • Performing for or Working Directly with the Public
  • Making Decisions and Solving Problems
  • Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events
  • Deal with People

  • Unpleasant/Angry People

  • Mostly Sitting

  • Make Decisions

  • $126,930

    Average Salary

What Does A Justice Do

Judges and hearing officers apply the law by overseeing the legal process in courts. They also conduct pretrial hearings, resolve administrative disputes, facilitate negotiations between opposing parties, and issue legal decisions.

Duties

Judges and hearing officers typically do the following:

  • Research legal issues
  • Read and evaluate information from documents, such as motions, claim applications, and records
  • Preside over hearings and listen to and read arguments by opposing parties
  • Determine if the information presented supports the charge, claim, or dispute
  • Decide if the procedure is being conducted according to the rules and law
  • Apply laws or precedents to reach judgments and to resolve disputes between parties
  • Write opinions, decisions, and instructions regarding cases, claims, and disputes

Judges commonly preside over trials and hearings of cases regarding nearly every aspect of society, from individual traffic offenses to issues concerning the rights of large corporations. Judges listen to arguments and determine if the evidence presented deserves a trial. In criminal cases, judges may decide that people charged with crimes should be held in jail until the trial, or they may set conditions for their release. They also approve search warrants and arrest warrants.

Judges interpret the law to determine how a trial will proceed, which is particularly important when unusual circumstances arise for which standard procedures have not been established. They ensure that hearings and trials are conducted fairly and that the legal rights of all involved parties are protected.

In trials in which juries are selected to decide the case, judges instruct jurors on applicable laws and direct them to consider the facts from the evidence. For other trials, judges decide the case. A judge who determines guilt in criminal cases may impose a sentence or penalty on the guilty party. In civil cases, the judge may award relief, such as compensation for damages, to the parties who win lawsuits.

Judges use various forms of technology, such as electronic databases and software, to manage cases and to prepare for trials. In some cases, a judge may manage the court’s administrative and clerical staff.

The following are examples of types of judges and hearing officers:

Judges, magistrate judges, and magistrates preside over trials and hearings. They typically work in local, state, and federal courts.

In local and state court systems, they have a variety of titles, such as municipal court judge, county court judge, and justice of the peace. Traffic violations, misdemeanors, small-claims cases, and pretrial hearings make up the bulk of these judges’ work.

In federal and state court systems, district court judges and general trial court judges have authority over any case in their system. Appellate court judges rule on a small number of cases, by reviewing decisions of the lower courts and lawyers’ written and oral arguments.

Administrative law judges, adjudicators, and hearing officers usually work for local, state, and federal government agencies. They decide many issues, such as whether a person is eligible for workers’ compensation benefits or whether employment discrimination occurred.

Show More

Show Less

How To Become A Justice

Judges and hearing officers typically must have a law degree and work experience as a lawyer.

Education

Although there may be a few positions available for those with a bachelor’s degree, a law degree typically is required for most jobs as a local, state, or federal judge or hearing officer.

In addition to earning a law degree, federal administrative law judges must pass a competitive exam from the U.S. Office of Personnel Management.

Earning a law degree usually takes 7 years of full-time study after high school: 4 years of undergraduate study, followed by 3 years of law school. Law degree programs include courses such as constitutional law, contracts, property law, civil procedure, and legal writing. For more information on how to become a lawyer, see the profile on lawyers.

Most judges and magistrates must be appointed or elected into their positions, a procedure that often takes political support. Many local and state judges are appointed to serve fixed renewable terms, ranging from 4 to 14 years. A few judges, such as appellate court judges, are appointed for life. Judicial nominating commissions screen candidates for judgeships in many states and for some federal judgeships. Some local and state judges are elected to a specific term in an election process.

For specific state information, including information on the number of judgeships by state, term lengths, and requirements for qualification, visit the National Center for State Courts.

Work Experience in a Related Occupation

Most judges and hearing officers learn their skills through years of experience as practicing lawyers. Some states allow those who are not lawyers to hold limited-jurisdiction judgeships, but opportunities are better for those with law experience.

Training

All states have some type of orientation for newly elected or appointed judges. The Federal Judicial Center, American Bar Association, National Judicial College, and National Center for State Courts provide judicial education and training for judges and other judicial branch personnel.

More than half of all states, as well as Puerto Rico, require judges to take continuing education courses while serving on the bench. General and continuing education courses usually last from a few days to 3 weeks.

Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations

Most judges and hearing officers are required to have a law license. In addition, they typically must maintain their law license and good standing with their state bar association while working as a judge or hearing officer.

Advancement

Advancement for some judicial workers means moving to courts with a broader jurisdiction. Advancement for various hearing officers includes taking on more complex cases, practicing law, and becoming district court judges.

Important Qualities

Critical-thinking skills. Judges and hearing officers must apply rules of law. They cannot let their own personal assumptions interfere with the proceedings. For example, they must base their decisions on specific meanings of the law when evaluating and deciding whether a person is a threat to others and must be sent to jail.

Decisionmaking skills. Judges and hearing officers must be able to weigh the facts, to apply the law and rules, and to make a decision relatively quickly.

Listening skills. Judges and hearing officers evaluate information, so they must pay close attention to what is being said.

Reading skills. Judges and hearing officers must be able to distinguish important facts from large amounts of sometimes complex information and then evaluate the facts objectively.

Writing skills. Judges and hearing officers write recommendations and decisions on appeals and disputes. They must be able to write their decisions clearly so that all sides understand the decision.

Show More

Show Less

Do you work as a Justice?

Justice Jobs

NO RESULTS

Aw snap, no jobs found.

Add To My Jobs

Do you work as a Justice?

Help others decide if this is a good career for them

Do you work as a Justice?

Justice Demographics

Gender

Female

54.3%

Male

42.7%

Unknown

3.0%
Ethnicity

White

78.2%

Hispanic or Latino

10.9%

Asian

8.2%

Unknown

2.0%

Black or African American

0.6%
Show More
Languages Spoken

Spanish

52.6%

French

11.4%

Chinese

4.4%

German

3.7%

Mandarin

3.5%

Italian

3.5%

Arabic

3.5%

Portuguese

3.0%

Russian

2.8%

Korean

2.6%

Hindi

1.6%

Japanese

1.6%

Urdu

1.2%

Cantonese

0.9%

Greek

0.9%

Vietnamese

0.7%

Hebrew

0.7%

Swahili

0.5%

Danish

0.5%

Bengali

0.5%
Show More

Justice Education

Schools

University of Phoenix

12.2%

American University

9.6%

George Washington University

7.5%

Georgetown University

7.1%

Strayer University

6.5%

Florida State University

6.1%

University of Maryland - College Park

4.7%

Howard University

4.7%

University of Maryland - University College

4.1%

Temple University

4.1%

George Mason University

3.7%

Liberty University

3.5%

Northeastern University

3.5%

Arizona State University

3.3%

Fordham University

3.3%

Florida International University

3.3%

Hofstra University

3.3%

Syracuse University

3.1%

University of North Carolina at Greensboro

3.1%

Boston University

3.1%
Show More
Majors

Law

22.6%

Criminal Justice

16.1%

Business

11.3%

Social Work

6.8%

Psychology

5.6%

Political Science

5.3%

Education

3.1%

Communication

2.9%

Sociology

2.9%

Legal Support Services

2.7%

School Counseling

2.5%

Legal Research And Advanced Professional Studies

2.4%

Management

2.2%

Accounting

2.2%

Nursing

2.1%

History

2.1%

Public Administration

1.9%

Computer Science

1.9%

Liberal Arts

1.7%

Computer Information Systems

1.7%
Show More
Degrees

Bachelors

32.4%

Masters

23.7%

Doctorate

17.8%

Other

16.2%

Associate

5.1%

Certificate

3.7%

Diploma

0.9%

License

0.1%
Show More
Job type you want
Full Time
Part Time
Internship
Temporary

How Would You Rate The Salary Of a Justice?

Have you worked as a Justice? Help other job seekers by rating your experience as a Justice.

Top Skills for A Justice

ProceduresFacilityPersonnelPublicSafetyTechnicalAssistancePoliceDepartmentTrialPreparationDirectSupervisionFinancialPrisonCustomerServiceIntakeDOJLegalResearchMentalHealthCrisisInterventionProbationOfficersHistoryWindowsLegalDocuments

Show More

  1. Procedures
  2. Facility
  3. Personnel
You can check out examples of real life uses of top skills on resumes here:
  • Served as an information clerk to employees and the public concerning the regulations, procedures and the preparation of citizenship applications.
  • Conducted face to face contacts with clients at home & at the residential facility.
  • Supervised and coordinated activities of departmental personnel as assigned.
  • Collected quantitative and qualitative data to evaluate USDOJ's efforts of advancing community development through public safety and crime prevention.
  • Provided technical assistance to universities, nonprofit organizations, local agencies and awardees of federal-funded projects.

How Would You Rate Working As a Justice?

Are you working as a Justice? Help us rate Justice as a Career.

Top Justice Employers

Show More