FIND PERSONALIZED JOBS
Sign up to Zippia and discover your career options with your personalized career search.
Sorry, we can't find that. Please try a different city or state.

Library Director

This job has expired and is no longer available.
APPLY NOW
Apply Now
×
FIND
PERSONALIZED JOBS

Sorry, we can't find that. Please try a different city or state.

CONTENT HAS
BEEN UNLOCKED
Close this window to view unlocked content
or
find interesting jobs in

Log In

Log In to Save

Sign Up to Save

Sign Up to Dismiss

Sign Up

SIGN UP TO UNLOCK CONTENT

or

The email and password you specified are invalid. Please, try again.

Email and password are mandatory

Forgot Password?

Don't have an account? Sign Up

reset password

Enter your email address and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Back to Log In

Log In

Log In to Save

Sign Up to Save

Sign Up to Dismiss

Sign up to save the job and get personalized job recommendations.

Sign up to dismiss the job and get personalized job recommendations.

or

The email and password you specified are invalid. Please, try again.

Email and password are mandatory

Already have an account? Log in

reset password

Enter your email address and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Back to Log In

Company Saved

Answer a few questions and view jobs at that match your preferences.

Where do you want to work?

Job Saved

See your Saved Jobs now

or

find more interesting jobs in

Job Dismissed

Find better matching jobs in

Your search has been saved!

Become A Library Director

Where do you want to work?

To get started, tell us where you'd like to work.
Sorry, we can't find that. Please try a different city or state.

Working As A Library Director

  • Getting Information
  • Interacting With Computers
  • Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates
  • Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events
  • Processing Information
  • Deal with People

  • Mostly Sitting

  • Make Decisions

  • $79,000

    Average Salary

What Does A Library Director Do

Librarians help people find information and conduct research for personal and professional use. Their job duties may change based on the type of library they work in, such as public, school, and medical libraries.

Duties

Librarians typically do the following:

  • Help library patrons conduct research and find the information they need
  • Teach classes about information resources
  • Help patrons evaluate search results and reference materials
  • Organize library materials so they are easy to find, and maintain collections
  • Plan programs for different audiences, such as storytelling for young children
  • Develop and use databases of library materials
  • Research new books and materials by reading book reviews, publishers’ announcements, and catalogs
  • Choose new books, audio books, videos, and other materials for the library
  • Research and buy new computers and other equipment as needed for the library
  • Train and direct library technicians, assistants, other support staff, and volunteers
  • Prepare library budgets

In small libraries, librarians are often responsible for many or all aspects of library operations. They may manage a staff of library assistants and technicians.

In larger libraries, librarians usually focus on one aspect of library work, including user services, technical services, or administrative services.

The following are examples of types of librarians:

User services librarians help patrons conduct research using both electronic and print resources. These librarians also teach patrons how to use library resources to find information on their own. This may include familiarizing patrons with catalogs of print materials, helping them access and search digital libraries, or educating them on Internet search techniques. Some user services librarians work with a particular audience, such as children or young adults.

Technical services librarians obtain, prepare, and organize print and electronic library materials. They arrange materials to make it easy for patrons to find information. They are also responsible for ordering new library materials and archiving to preserve older items.

Administrative services librarians manage libraries. They hire and supervise staff, prepare budgets, and negotiate contracts for library materials and equipment. Some conduct public relations or fundraising for the library.

Librarians who work in different settings sometimes have different job duties.

Academic librarians assist students, faculty, and staff in colleges and universities. They help students research topics related to their coursework and teach students how to access information. They also assist faculty and staff in locating resources related to their research projects or studies. Some campuses have multiple libraries, and librarians may specialize in a particular subject.

Public librarians work in their communities to serve all members of the public. They help patrons find books to read for pleasure; conduct research for schoolwork, business, or personal interest; and learn how to access the library’s resources. Many public librarians plan programs for patrons, such as story time for children, book clubs, or other educational activities.

School librarians, sometimes called school media specialists, work in elementary, middle, and high school libraries, and teach students how to use library resources. They also help teachers develop lesson plans and find materials for classroom instruction.

Special librarians work in settings other than school or public libraries. They are sometimes called information professionals. Law firms, hospitals, businesses, museums, government agencies, and many other groups have their own libraries that use special librarians. The main purpose of these libraries and information centers is to serve the information needs of the organization that houses the library. Therefore, special librarians collect and organize materials focused on those subjects. The following are examples of special librarians:

  • Corporate librarians assist employees in private businesses in conducting research and finding information. They work for a wide range of businesses, including insurance companies, consulting firms, and publishers.
  • Government librarians provide research services and access to information for government staff and the public.
  • Law librarians help lawyers, law students, judges, and law clerks locate and organize legal resources. They often work in law firms and law school libraries.
  • Medical librarians, also called health science librarians, help health professionals, patients, and researchers find health and science information. They may provide information about new clinical trials and medical treatments and procedures, teach medical students how to locate medical information, or answer consumers’ health questions.

Show More

Show Less

How To Become A Library Director

Most librarians need a master’s degree in library science. Some positions have additional requirements, such as a teaching certificate or a degree in another field.

Education

Most employers require librarians to have a master’s degree in library science (MLS). Students need a bachelor’s degree in any major to enter MLS programs.

MLS programs usually take 1 to 2 years to complete. Coursework typically covers selecting library materials, organizing information, research methods and strategies, online reference systems, and Internet search methods. 

A degree from an American Library Association accredited program may lead to better job opportunities. Some colleges and universities have other names for their library science programs, such as Master of Information Studies or Master of Library and Information Studies.

Librarians working in a special library, such as a law, medical, or corporate library, usually supplement a master’s degree in library science with knowledge of their specialized field. Some employers require special librarians to have a master’s degree, a professional degree, or a Ph.D. in that subject. For example, a law librarian may be required to have a law degree or a librarian in an academic library may need a Ph.D.

Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations

Public school librarians typically need a teacher’s certification. Some states require librarians to pass a standardized test, such as the PRAXIS II Library Media Specialist test. A list of requirements by state and contact information for state regulating boards is available from Libraries Unlimited. 

Some states also require certification for librarians in public libraries. Requirements vary by state. Contact your state’s licensing board for specific requirements.

Important Qualities

Communication skills. Librarians need to be able to explain ideas and information in ways that patrons and users understand.

Initiative. New information, technology, and resources constantly change the details of what librarians do. They must be able and willing to continually update their knowledge on these changes to be effective at their jobs in the varying circumstances.

Interpersonal skills. Librarians must be able to work both as part of a team and with the public or with researchers

Problem-solving skills. Librarians conduct and assist with research. This requires being able to identify a problem, figure out where to find information, and draw conclusions based on the information found.

Reading skills. Librarians must be excellent readers. Those working in special libraries are expected to continually read the latest literature in their field of specialization.

Technology skills. Librarians use technology to help patrons research topics. They also use computers to classify resources, create databases, and perform administrative duties.

Show More

Show Less

Do you work as a Library Director?

Send To A Friend

Library Director Jobs

NO RESULTS

Aw snap, no jobs found.

Add To My Jobs

Do you work as a Library Director?

Average Yearly Salary
$79,000
Show Salaries
$38,000
Min 10%
$79,000
Median 50%
$79,000
Median 50%
$79,000
Median 50%
$79,000
Median 50%
$79,000
Median 50%
$79,000
Median 50%
$79,000
Median 50%
$165,000
Max 90%
Best Paying Company
City of Riverside
Highest Paying City
Rancho Cordova, CA
Highest Paying State
District of Columbia
Avg Experience Level
4.7 years
How much does a Library Director make at top companies?
The national average salary for a Library Director in the United States is $79,723 per year or $38 per hour. Those in the bottom 10 percent make under $38,000 a year, and the top 10 percent make over $165,000.

Real Library Director Salaries

Job Title Company Location Start Date Salary
Director, Library Medical College of Wisconsin Milwaukee, WI Jan 05, 2016 $150,000
Associate Library Director for Research Services Weill Cornell Medical College New York, NY Aug 29, 2016 $100,000 -
$130,000
Associate Library Director Champlain College, Inc. Burlington, VT Feb 01, 2016 $72,000
Assistant Library Director/Instructor Southeast Missouri State University Cape Girardeau, MO Feb 01, 2014 $60,000
Library Director Saugerties Public Library District Saugerties, NY Apr 18, 2011 $52,000
Library Director Saugerties Public Library Saugerties, NY Apr 18, 2011 $52,000
Library-Director The Art Institute of Houston Houston, TX Sep 01, 2010 $51,000
Director of Library Services Interamerican College National City, CA Oct 14, 2009 $50,000
Library Director City of Cohoes Cohoes, NY Nov 01, 2010 $43,597
Library Director Cohoes Public Library Cohoes, NY Jan 04, 2010 $42,992
Library Director City of Cohoes Cohoes, NY Jan 04, 2010 $42,992
Library Director City of Cohoes Cohoes, NY Jan 05, 2010 $42,992
Music Library Director Donaleshen & Associates, Inc. Los Angeles, CA Oct 01, 2010 $41,740

No Results

To get more results, try adjusting your search by changing your filters.

See More Salaries

How Would You Rate The Salary Of a Library Director?

Have you worked as a Library Director? Help other job seekers by rating your experience as a Library Director.

Top Skills for A Library Director

  1. Library Materials
  2. Collection Development
  3. Information Literacy Instruction
You can check out examples of real life uses of top skills on resumes here:
  • Analyzed operational costs of library materials selection and implemented centralized selection resulting in 8,000+personnel hours / year savings.
  • Operated a college library including the collection development, acquisitions, AACR2 cataloging and circulation of materials.
  • Increased library and information literacy instruction to all English composition and introductory courses and to include use of online library.
  • Directed a small public library and my duties involved overall management of staff supervision, budget, and community relations.
  • Initiated development of our online catalog.

Rank:

Average Salary:

Embed On Your Website

Top 10 Best States for Library Directors

  1. Wyoming
  2. North Dakota
  3. Colorado
  4. District of Columbia
  5. Minnesota
  6. California
  7. Texas
  8. Kentucky
  9. Rhode Island
  10. Louisiana
  • (2 jobs)
  • (1 jobs)
  • (5 jobs)
  • (3 jobs)
  • (5 jobs)
  • (54 jobs)
  • (18 jobs)
  • (1 jobs)
  • (2 jobs)
  • (1 jobs)

Library Director Demographics

Gender

Female

63.8%

Male

26.8%

Unknown

9.4%
Ethnicity

White

68.3%

Hispanic or Latino

11.8%

Black or African American

10.2%

Asian

6.1%

Unknown

3.6%
Show More
Foreign Languages Spoken

Spanish

47.6%

German

9.5%

Portuguese

7.1%

French

4.8%

Italian

4.8%

Swahili

2.4%

Chinese

2.4%

Turkish

2.4%

Russian

2.4%

Hebrew

2.4%

Czech

2.4%

Armenian

2.4%

Mandarin

2.4%

Polish

2.4%

Arabic

2.4%

Korean

2.4%
Show More

Library Director Education

Schools

University of North Texas

9.1%

University of Pittsburgh -

9.1%

Simmons College

7.2%

Southern Connecticut State University

5.8%

Kent State University

5.8%

Dominican University

5.3%

Florida State University

5.3%

Drexel University

5.3%

Wayne State University

4.8%

Syracuse University

4.3%

University of South Florida

4.3%

Texas Woman's University

4.3%

San Jose State University

4.3%

University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee

4.3%

Clarion University of Pennsylvania

4.3%

University of Kentucky

3.8%

University of Missouri - Columbia

3.4%

Emporia State University

3.4%

State University of New York Buffalo

2.9%

Nova Southeastern University

2.9%
Show More
Majors

Library Science

30.3%

Library Science And Administration

18.9%

Business

7.3%

Information Sciences

5.0%

Elementary Education

4.5%

English

4.5%

Education

4.2%

History

4.2%

Psychology

2.8%

General Education, Specific Areas

2.8%

Communication

1.9%

Law

1.9%

Writing

1.7%

Fine Arts

1.6%

Public Administration

1.6%

Management

1.6%

Accounting

1.6%

Educational Leadership

1.4%

Nursing

1.2%

Liberal Arts

1.2%
Show More
Degrees

Masters

48.5%

Bachelors

20.9%

Other

17.1%

Doctorate

5.2%

Certificate

4.3%

Associate

3.3%

License

0.5%

Diploma

0.2%
Show More

Job type you want
Full Time
Part Time
Internship
Temporary

How Would You Rate Working As a Library Director?

Are you working as a Library Director? Help us rate Library Director as a Career.

Top Library Director Employers

Show More

Jobs From Top Library Director Employers

Library Director Videos

Mount Mercy University - Marilyn Murphy, Library Director

Careers Panel: Career Opportunities in Libraries Today (1/5)

The Director (Career Guides)

Related To Your Recently Viewed Content