A Managing Director oversees workflow and progress, making sure that all operations align within the company or organization's mission or set of goals. They are responsible for crafting strategies, devising effective business plans, and executing guidelines that would nurture a company's growth, and as well as to be the driving force that would direct employees to the company's objectives. Furthermore, a Managing Director must coordinate with those in a higher position, such as the members of the board.

Managing Director Responsibilities

Here are examples of responsibilities from real managing director resumes representing typical tasks they are likely to perform in their roles.

  • Create and manage the social media presence via a festival page on Facebook.
  • Manage all consulting resources and have overall P/L responsibilities for the Atlanta office.
  • Perform business functions for the LLC including accounting, legal work, managing contractors and submitting taxes.
  • Manage installation of commodity and interest rate trading systems at large trading floors in the UK and Europe.
  • Manage the lessee and lessor relationships regarding exchange seat leases with major markets, such as NYSE, AMEX, CBOE.
  • Manage LLC tax responsibilities and charitable donations.
  • Engage in underwriting, modeling and due diligence for prospective healthcare real estate acquisitions, including profitability analysis and market research.
  • Develop and execute international business development, new market and product development strategy for a technology start-up company.
  • Lead asset management function including budget development and analysis of and strategic planning for economic performance of real estate asset portfolio.
  • Develop the private client group, which targets the brokerage community.
Managing Director Traits
Leadership skills directly correlate with a person's ability to lead others toward success or an accomplishment.
Management skills directly correlate with a person's ability to communicate and lead others while being able to solve problems..
Problem-solving skills is the way that one is able to effectively solve a problem in a timely manner.

Managing Director Job Description

Perhaps the hardest question to answer when deciding on a career as a managing director is "should I become a managing director?" You might find this info to be helpful. When compared to other jobs, managing director careers are projected to have a growth rate described as "as fast as average" at 6% from 2018 through 2028. This is in accordance with the Bureau of Labor Statistics. What's more, is that the projected number of opportunities that are predicted to become available for a managing director by 2028 is 150,600.

Managing directors average about $77.09 an hour, which makes the managing director annual salary $160,351. Additionally, managing directors are known to earn anywhere from $87,000 to $292,000 a year. This means that the top-earning managing directors make $205,000 more than the lowest earning ones.

It's hard work to become a managing director, but even the most dedicated employees consider switching careers from time to time. Whether you're interested in a more challenging position or just looking for a fresh start, we've compiled extensive information on becoming a division vice president, director of operations and finance, director of business operations, and director of managed services.

Managing Director Jobs You Might Like

Managing Director Resume Examples

Managing Director Skills and Personality Traits

We calculated that 8% of Managing Directors are proficient in Business Development, Healthcare, and Portfolio. They’re also known for soft skills such as Leadership skills, Management skills, and Problem-solving skills.

We break down the percentage of Managing Directors that have these skills listed on their resume here:

  • Business Development, 8%

    Developed and managed global client relationships, business development, and practice-wide engagement delivery in North America, Europe and Asia.

  • Healthcare, 8%

    United HealthCare purchased the merged group health departments of MetLife and Travelers.

  • Portfolio, 7%

    Led asset management function including budget development and analysis of and strategic planning for economic performance of real estate asset portfolio.

  • Oversight, 6%

    Managed and cultivated external vendor partner relationships including contracting, operational governance, service level agreement management oversight and issue resolution.

  • Project Management, 6%

    Project Management - Provide nation-wide security for Northwest Airlines and executive protection for 75 executives during a contentious national labor dispute.

  • Customer Service, 5%

    Trained recruiters in technology terminology, resume assessment and qualifications evaluation; ensured quality and customer service standards were consistently maintained.

"business development," "healthcare," and "portfolio" aren't the only skills we found managing directors list on their resumes. In fact, there's a whole list of managing director responsibilities that we found, including:

  • The most important skills for a managing director to have in this position are leadership skills. In this excerpt that we gathered from a managing director resume, you'll understand why: "top executives must be able to lead an organization successfully by coordinating policies, people, and resources." According to resumes we found, leadership skills can be used by a managing director in order to "provide strategic direction and leadership in designing and implementing an effective control infrastructure across oreo asset management operations. "
  • Another commonly found skill for being able to perform managing director duties is the following: management skills. According to a managing director resume, "top executives must shape and direct the operations of an organization." Check out this example of how managing directors use management skills: "provided strategic direction for all computing technologies and developed and maintained process/procedure for all problem, change and asset management. "
  • Problem-solving skills is also an important skill for managing directors to have. This example of how managing directors use this skill comes from a managing director resume, "top executives need to identify and resolve issues within an organization" Read this excerpt from a resume to understand how vital it is to their everyday roles and responsibilities, "worked on two asset management contracts with resolution trust corporation with two separate companies. "
  • In order for certain managing director responsibilities to be completed, the job requires the skill "time-management skills." According to a managing director resume, "top executives do many tasks at the same time, typically under their own direction, to ensure that their work gets done and that they meet their goals." As an example, this snippet was taken directly from a resume about how this skill applies: "ensured all business units completed transactions as scheduled and according to deadlines. "
  • Yet another important skill that a managing director must demonstrate is "communication skills." Top executives must be able to communicate clearly and persuasively This is clearly demonstrated in this example from a managing director who stated: "major clients included organizations from advertising/marketing; associations; automotive, financial services, packaged goods, and telecommunications. "
  • See the full list of managing director skills.

    After discovering the most helpful skills, we moved onto what kind of education might be helpful in becoming a managing director. We found that 67.5% of managing directors have graduated with a bachelor's degree and 21.2% of people in this position have earned their master's degrees. While most managing directors have a college degree, you may find it's also true that generally it's impossible to be successful in this career with only a high school degree. In fact, our research shows that one out of every nine managing directors were not college graduates.

    Those managing directors who do attend college, typically earn either business degrees or finance degrees. Less commonly earned degrees for managing directors include accounting degrees or marketing degrees.

    When you're ready to become a managing director, you might wonder which companies hire managing directors. According to our research through managing director resumes, managing directors are mostly hired by Anthem, PricewaterhouseCoopers, and KPMG. Now is a good time to apply as Anthem has 114 managing directors job openings, and there are 71 at PricewaterhouseCoopers and 62 at KPMG.

    If you're interested in companies where managing directors make the most money, you'll want to apply for positions at Accenture, CIT Group, and RBS Securities. We found that at Accenture, the average managing director salary is $316,063. Whereas at CIT Group, managing directors earn roughly $312,004. And at RBS Securities, they make an average salary of $300,431.

    View more details on managing director salaries across the United States.

    We also looked into companies who hire managing directors from the top 100 educational institutions in the U.S. The top three companies that hire the most from these institutions include Bank of America, Citi, and Wells Fargo.

    In general, managing directors fulfill roles in the finance and professional industries. While employment numbers are high in those industries, the managing director annual salary is the highest in the media industry with $208,324 as the average salary. Meanwhile, the finance and manufacturing industries pay $202,228 and $149,087 respectively. This means that managing directors who are employed in the media industry make 72.4% more than managing directors who work in the transportation Industry.

    The three companies that hire the most prestigious managing directors are:

      What Division Vice Presidents Do

      Division Vice Presidents are company executives that oversee a particular department or division. They are often employed in companies with a varied product line or wide geographical reach, thus needing divisions to streamline processes. Division Vice Presidents should have a solid background in the particular division that they are handling. They ensure that their division's performance is at par or would even exceed company targets and expectations.

      We looked at the average managing director annual salary and compared it with the average of a division vice president. Generally speaking, division vice presidents receive $28,246 lower pay than managing directors per year.

      Even though managing directors and division vice presidents have vast differences in their careers, a few of the skills required to do both jobs are similar. For example, both careers require business development, healthcare, and oversight in the day-to-day roles.

      There are some key differences in responsibilities as well. For example, a managing director responsibilities require skills like "portfolio," "customer service," "financial services," and "account management." Meanwhile a typical division vice president has skills in areas such as "new customers," "sales goals," "loan portfolio," and "action plans." This difference in skills reveals how truly different these two careers really are.

      Division vice presidents receive the highest salaries in the health care industry coming in with an average yearly salary of $157,865. But managing directors are paid more in the media industry with an average salary of $208,324.

      Division vice presidents tend to reach lower levels of education than managing directors. In fact, division vice presidents are 9.9% less likely to graduate with a Master's Degree and 0.6% less likely to have a Doctoral Degree.

      What Are The Duties Of a Director Of Operations And Finance?

      A director of operations and finance is in charge of overseeing and spearheading business and financial operations, ensuring efficiency and smooth workflow. Their responsibilities revolve around performing research and analysis to identify the best practices to optimize operations, coordinating with different departments to gather data, conducting research and analysis to identify new business and investment opportunities, and monitoring the progress of various projects and programs. Furthermore, as a director, it is essential to lead and encourage the workforce to reach goals, all while implementing the company's policies and regulations.

      Now we're going to look at the director of operations and finance profession. On average, directors of operations and finance earn a $60,439 lower salary than managing directors a year.

      Not everything about these jobs is different. Take their skills, for example. Managing directors and directors of operations and finance both include similar skills like "business development," "oversight," and "project management" on their resumes.

      In addition to the difference in salary, there are some other key differences that are worth noting. For example, managing director responsibilities are more likely to require skills like "healthcare," "portfolio," "customer service," and "financial services." Meanwhile, a director of operations and finance might be skilled in areas such as "ensure compliance," "internal audit," "payroll," and "procedures." These differences highlight just how different the day-to-day in each role looks.

      Directors of operations and finance may earn a lower salary than managing directors, but directors of operations and finance earn the most pay in the health care industry with an average salary of $166,333. On the other side of things, managing directors receive higher paychecks in the media industry where they earn an average of $208,324.

      In general, directors of operations and finance study at higher levels of education than managing directors. They're 6.7% more likely to obtain a Master's Degree while being 0.6% less likely to earn a Doctoral Degree.

      How a Director Of Business Operations Compares

      The position of a director of business operations involves the direction and coordination of an organization. It is the main responsibility of the directors of operations to oversee the profitability and overall growth of their organization. Their job includes staff management, department supervision, goods production, and expense control. They handle the company's resources, create and implement an operational plan, and make sure that the procedures are executed properly. The skills necessary for this position include leadership skills, management skills, customer service, and communication skills.

      Let's now take a look at the director of business operations profession. On average, these workers make lower salaries than managing directors with a $51,551 difference per year.

      While looking through the resumes of several managing directors and directors of business operations we discovered that both professions have similar skills. These similarities include skills such as "business development," "oversight," and "project management," but they differ when it comes to other required skills.

      Some important key differences between the two careers are a few of the skills necessary to fulfill responsibilities. Some examples from managing director resumes include skills like "healthcare," "portfolio," "financial services," and "client relationships," whereas a director of business operations might be skilled in "procedures," "ensure compliance," "key performance indicators," and "special projects. "

      Interestingly enough, directors of business operations earn the most pay in the telecommunication industry, where they command an average salary of $153,453. As mentioned previously, managing directors highest annual salary comes from the media industry with an average salary of $208,324.

      Directors of business operations are known to earn similar educational levels when compared to managing directors. Additionally, they're 1.1% more likely to graduate with a Master's Degree, and 3.0% more likely to earn a Doctoral Degree.

      Description Of a Director Of Managed Services

      A director of managed services is in charge of overseeing the business processes in an organization, ensuring efficiency and smooth workflow. Their responsibilities typically revolve around setting goals and objectives, managing the workforce, spearheading projects and campaigns, devising strategies to optimize services, and coordinating with analysts to identify new business opportunities. Furthermore, as a director, it is essential to lead and encourage the workforce to reach new heights, all while implementing the company's policies and regulations.

      Directors of managed services tend to earn a lower pay than managing directors by about $41,690 per year.

      According to resumes from both managing directors and directors of managed services, some of the skills necessary to complete the responsibilities of each role are similar. These skills include "business development," "healthcare," and "portfolio. "

      Each job requires different skills like "financial services," "account management," "human resources," and "performance management," which might show up on a managing director resume. Whereas director of managed services might include skills like "cloud," "infrastructure," "service delivery," and "ensure compliance."

      Directors of managed services earn a higher salary in the energy industry with an average of $164,571. Whereas, managing directors earn the highest salary in the media industry.

      Directors of managed services reach lower levels of education when compared to managing directors. The difference is that they're 10.0% more likely to earn a Master's Degree less, and 2.8% less likely to graduate with a Doctoral Degree.