What is a Medical Receptionist

Paging Dr. Fauci. As a medical receptionist, it's your job to make sure patients and visitors get to where they need to be. You also need to be able to provide information to people who call or walk in with questions.

While being knowledgeable is important in this position, memorizing might be even more important. If a patient comes in with an emergency, you need to be able to stay calm while figuring out exactly where they need to go. And some hospitals are pretty big, so that can be a difficult task.

The job requires you to have a high school diploma before you can get started. And it's useful to be a good communicator as well. You wouldn't want to accidentally send a patient with a broken arm to the pregnancy center. Unless, of course, that patient was also pregnant - but that's another story.

There is more than meets the eye when it comes to being a Medical Receptionist. For example, did you know that they make an average of $14.54 an hour? That's $30,245 a year!

Between 2018 and 2028, the career is expected to grow -7% and produce -276,700 job opportunities across the U.S.

What Does a Medical Receptionist Do

There are certain skills that many Medical Receptionists have in order to accomplish their responsibilities. By taking a look through resumes, we were able to narrow down the most common skills for a person in this position. We discovered that a lot of resumes listed Analytical skills, Detail oriented and Technical skills.

Learn more about what a Medical Receptionist does

How To Become a Medical Receptionist

If you're interested in becoming a Medical Receptionist, one of the first things to consider is how much education you need. We've determined that 22.4% of Medical Receptionists have a bachelor's degree. In terms of higher education levels, we found that 2.0% of Medical Receptionists have master's degrees. Even though some Medical Receptionists have a college degree, it's possible to become one with only a high school degree or GED.

Choosing the right major is always an important step when researching how to become a Medical Receptionist. When we researched the most common majors for a Medical Receptionist, we found that they most commonly earn Associate Degree degrees or Bachelor's Degree degrees. Other degrees that we often see on Medical Receptionist resumes include High School Diploma degrees or Diploma degrees.

You may find that experience in other jobs will help you become a Medical Receptionist. In fact, many Medical Receptionist jobs require experience in a role such as Medical Assistant. Meanwhile, many Medical Receptionists also have previous career experience in roles such as Receptionist or Administrative Assistant.

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Average Salary
$30,245
Average Salary
Job Growth Rate
-7%
Job Growth Rate
Job Openings
112,678
Job Openings
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Medical Receptionist Career Paths

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Average Salary for a Medical Receptionist

Medical Receptionists in America make an average salary of $30,245 per year or $15 per hour. The top 10 percent makes over $35,000 per year, while the bottom 10 percent under $26,000 per year.
Average Salary
$30,245
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Medical Receptionist Resumes

Designing and figuring out what to include on your resume can be tough, not to mention time-consuming. That's why we put together a guide that is designed to help you craft the perfect resume for becoming a Medical Receptionist. If you're needing extra inspiration, take a look through our selection of templates that are specific to your job.

Learn How To Write a Medical Receptionist Resume

At Zippia, we went through countless Medical Receptionist resumes and compiled some information about how to optimize them. Here are some suggestions based on what we found, divided by the individual sections of the resume itself.

View Medical Receptionist Resume Examples And Templates

Medical Receptionist Demographics

Medical Receptionist Gender Statistics

female

87.6 %

male

8.7 %

unknown

3.7 %

Medical Receptionist Ethnicity Statistics

White

74.5 %

Black or African American

10.8 %

Hispanic or Latino

9.0 %

Medical Receptionist Foreign Languages Spoken Statistics

Spanish

79.3 %

French

3.6 %

Portuguese

2.5 %
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Medical Receptionist Education

Medical Receptionist Majors

17.2 %

Medical Receptionist Degrees

Associate

28.2 %

Bachelors

22.4 %

High School Diploma

22.3 %

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None
High School / GED
Associate
Bachelor's
Master's
Doctorate
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Online Courses For Medical Receptionist That You May Like

Speak Medical Spanish to Your Patients and Clients
udemy
4.6
(369)

Spanish essentials for healthcare; program teaches correct pronunciation, pain management and medication, among others...

Partnering with the Public and Patients in Medical Research
edX (Global)

There are many benefits to partnering with patients in medical research. Yet despite much to be gained, patients and researchers often fail to meaningfully partner to advance medical science. How might we create trusting relationships between patients and researchers? What models might exist to enable inclusivity and respect of all relevant stakeholders in the medical research enterprise? These are just some of the topics we will cover in this Stanford Online course. Patients can move past the...

Patient Safety
coursera

Preventable patient harms, including medical errors and healthcare-associated complications, are a global public health threat. Moreover, patients frequently do not receive treatments and interventions known to improve their outcomes. These shortcomings typically result not from individual clinicians' mistakes, but from systemic problems - communication breakdowns, poor teamwork, and poorly designed care processes, to name a few.\n\nThe Patient Safety & Quality Leadership Specialization covers t...

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Top Skills For a Medical Receptionist

The skills section on your resume can be almost as important as the experience section, so you want it to be an accurate portrayal of what you can do. Luckily, we've found all of the skills you'll need so even if you don't have these skills yet, you know what you need to work on. Out of all the resumes we looked through, 11.2% of Medical Receptionists listed Medical Records on their resume, but soft skills such as Analytical skills and Detail oriented are important as well.

12 Medical Receptionist RESUME EXAMPLES

Best States For a Medical Receptionist

Some places are better than others when it comes to starting a career as a Medical Receptionist. The best states for people in this position are Washington, California, Oregon, and Maine. Medical Receptionists make the most in Washington with an average salary of $36,211. Whereas in California and Oregon, they would average $35,951 and $34,426, respectively. While Medical Receptionists would only make an average of $34,054 in Maine, you would still make more there than in the rest of the country. We determined these as the best states based on job availability and pay. By finding the median salary, cost of living, and using the Bureau of Labor Statistics' Location Quotient, we narrowed down our list of states to these four.

1. Maine

Total Medical Receptionist Jobs:
327
Highest 10% Earn:
$41,000
Location Quotient:
1.6
Location Quotient is a measure used by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) to determine how concentrated a certain industry is in a single state compared to the nation as a whole. You can read more about how BLS calculates location quotients here

2. Washington

Total Medical Receptionist Jobs:
1,147
Highest 10% Earn:
$42,000
Location Quotient:
1.02
Location Quotient is a measure used by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) to determine how concentrated a certain industry is in a single state compared to the nation as a whole. You can read more about how BLS calculates location quotients here

3. Minnesota

Total Medical Receptionist Jobs:
1,661
Highest 10% Earn:
$38,000
Location Quotient:
1.63
Location Quotient is a measure used by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) to determine how concentrated a certain industry is in a single state compared to the nation as a whole. You can read more about how BLS calculates location quotients here
Full List Of Best States For Medical Receptionists

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Becoming a Medical Receptionist FAQs

How long does it take to become a medical receptionist?

It typically takes two to four years to become a medical receptionist. Generally, this is the time it takes to gain the minimal education and necessary experience to fulfill the duties of this role.

Though some employers prefer candidates who have more qualifications, most roles only require a high school diploma or equivalent as the minimum education requirement for a role as a medical receptionist.

However, many aspiring medical receptionists decide to pursue certification from a technical school or community college in addition to a high school diploma.

Though these can be taken at any pace, these certificate programs typically take about one year to finish and cover topics like:

  • Understanding physician orders

  • Records management

  • Office procedures

  • Medical Billing/Coding

  • Medical terminology

  • Transcription

  • Hospital procedures

  • Anatomy and physiology

Because hands-on experience is so important for this role, most certification programs include a clinical experience requirement.

Because the qualifications for this profession are so varied and flexible, experience is often just as valuable as education. Though there are entry-level medical receptionist positions, some begin their career as certified nursing assistants before pursuing this role.

Learn more about this question

How much does a receptionist make at a doctor's office?

A receptionist at a doctor's office makes a median annual salary of around $37,000 in a year. This role, often called a medical receptionist, has a range of hourly pay rates that goes from just under $12 up to $20.

With overtime and bonuses, the total range of annual pay for medical receptionists is $24,000 to $40,000 in a year. This range is due to various factors affecting potential earnings, including years of experience, employer, and location.

When considering possible earnings in the role of medical receptionists, the most important factor that affects pay rate is experience level. The median annual wage for entry-level medical receptionists is $31,000. However, for mid-career and late-career professionals, the median salary moves up to $37,000 in a year.

Another factor in salaries for medical receptionists is employer and industry. Those working for grantmaking and giving services earned an average wage of almost $50,000 annually.

This was higher than the $46,000 average wage earned by those working for computer systems design and the $46,000 average wage of those working for religious organizations.

Finally, location also influences salaries for medical receptionists. The highest average earnings were reported in the District of Columbia. Other high-paying states for this role include Massachusetts, California, and Washington.

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Is being a medical receptionist a good job?

Yes, being a medical receptionist is a good job. This position is fairly important to the everyday management of a hospital or doctor's office. A medical receptionist's job is to perform clerical and supportive work in a hospital unit, ensuring that everything runs efficiently and avoids delays.

These duties include keeping track of patients and physicians, ensuring the nursing station is staffed at all times, providing directions to visitors, and maintaining inventory (so all supplies are available when needed).

In support of these primary duties, medical receptionists often help patients and visitors fill out forms, communicate with other staff members, answer telephones, and assist as needed during emergencies.

To fulfill these critical functions of the role, medical receptionists need to be familiar with medical procedures and abbreviations, able to respond to requests from staff and visitors, and capable of multitasking.

This is a high-stakes position where mistakes can cause viable harm to patients, so a medical receptionist needs to seek perfection in duties and responsibilities. Finally, they also need to be familiar with the Health Insurance Portability Accountability Act guidelines, which cover patient privacy and what can be done with medical records.

Learn more about this question

What qualifications do you need to be a medical receptionist?

The qualifications to become a medical receptionist include a high school diploma and some experience and knowledge working in healthcare environments. It typically takes two to four years to become a medical receptionist.

Generally, this is the time it takes to gain the minimal education and necessary experience to fulfill the duties of this role.

Though some employers prefer candidates who have more qualifications, most roles only require a high school diploma or equivalent as the minimum education requirement for a role as a medical receptionist.

However, many aspiring medical receptionists decide to pursue certification from a technical school or community college in addition to a high school diploma.

Though these can be taken at any pace, these certificate programs typically take about one year to finish and cover topics like:

  • Understanding physician orders

  • Records management

  • Office procedures

  • Medical Billing/Coding

  • Medical terminology

  • Transcription

  • Hospital procedures

  • Anatomy and physiology

Because hands-on experience is so important for this role, most certification programs include a clinical experience requirement.

Because the qualifications for this profession are so varied and flexible, experience is often just as valuable as education. Though there are entry-level medical receptionist positions, some begin their career as certified nursing assistants before pursuing this role.

Learn more about this question

What skills do you need to be a medical receptionist?

The skills a person needs to be a medical receptionist include communication and interpersonal skills. They also need to have a basic understanding of the healthcare field and terminology.

This position is fairly important to the everyday management of a hospital or doctor's office. A medical receptionist's job is to perform clerical and supportive work in a hospital unit, ensuring that everything runs efficiently and avoids delays.

These duties include keeping track of patients and physicians, ensuring the nursing station is staffed at all times, providing directions to visitors, and maintaining inventory (so all supplies are available when needed).

To fulfill these critical functions of the role, medical receptionists need to be familiar with medical procedures and abbreviations, able to respond to requests from staff and visitors, and capable of multitasking.

This is a high-stakes position where mistakes can cause viable harm to patients, so a medical receptionist needs to seek perfection in duties and responsibilities. Finally, they also need to be familiar with the Health Insurance Portability Accountability Act guidelines, which cover patient privacy and what can be done with medical records.

Learn more about this question

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