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Become A Military

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Working As A Military

  • Operating Vehicles, Mechanized Devices, or Equipment
  • Getting Information
  • Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Material
  • Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events
  • Making Decisions and Solving Problems
  • Mostly Sitting

  • Stressful

  • Make Decisions

  • $75,150

    Average Salary

What Does A Military Do At Compass Group, North America

* Scrapes and rinses food from dirty dishes and washes them by hand or places them in racks or on conveyor to dishwashing machine depending on assigned equipment.
* Ensures complete cleanliness and sanitation.
* Washes pots, pans and trays based on assigned procedures.
* Ensure complete cleanliness and sanitation.
* Polishes silver using burnishing machine tumbler, chemical dip, buffing wheel and hand cloth depending on assigned equipment and procedures.
* Ensures complete cleanliness and sanitation.
* Ensures compliance with outlined safety procedures.
* Maintains temperatures and chemical levels as outlined by provided standards.
* Keeps dish area orderly and in compliance with safety standards.
* Sweeps and mops kitchen floors to ensure compliance with safety and sanitation standards.
* Washes worktables, walls, refrigerators, meat blocks and other food prep surfaces.
* Removes trash and places it in designated containers.
* Steam cleans or hoses out garbage cans.
* Transfers supplies and equipment between storage and work areas.
* Helps load and unload supplies and product.
* Performs other duties as assigned.
* About Compass Group: Achieving leadership in the foodservice industry
* Compass Group is an equal opportunity employer.
* At Compass, we are committed to treating all Applicants and Associates fairly based on their abilities, achievements, and experience without regard to race, national origin, sex, age, disability, veteran status, sexual orientation, gender identity, or any other classification protected by law.
* Qualified candidates must be able to perform the essential functions of this position satisfactorily with or without a reasonable accommodation.
* Disclaimer: this job post is not necessarily an exhaustive list of all essential responsibilities, skills, tasks, or requirements associated with this position.
* While this is intended to be an accurate reflection of the position posted, the Company reserves the right to modify or change the essential functions of the job based on business necessity. /
* Los Angeles applicants: Compass Group will consider for employment qualified applicants with criminal histories in a manner consistent with the requirements of the Los Angeles Fair Chance Initiative for Hiring (Ban the Box ordinance)./
* Req ID

What Does A Military Do At Us Security Associates Inc.

* Maintain Command and Control over designated duty areas detecting suspicious activities and watching for criminal acts or client rule infractions which may be a threat to the Client, Client Property, or Employees at the site.
* Provide specialized security in complex operational areas, requiring specific knowledge of the operating environment.
* Approach unauthorized persons and/or security code violator s, determine the appropriate course of action, escort violators from the property if needed and notify police when appropriate.
* Report all incidents, accidents, or medical emergencies.
* Respond to emergencies (medical, bomb threats, alarms, intrusions) and follow emergency response guidelines.
* Examines doors and windows to ensure security; use client keys to open and close buildings; monitor closed buildings for unauthorized persons and suspicious activities.
* Provides escorts as necessary.
* Inform and warn violators of rule infractions (loitering, smoking, carrying forbidden articles).
* Perform miscellaneous job-related duties as assigned.
* Conduct Random Foot Patrols of assigned area of responsibility Performs miscellaneous job-related duties as assigned

What Does A Military Do At ICF Consulting Group, Inc.

* _
* Responding to assigned tasks in order to achieve an effect to meet a desired commander's intent) in support of mission/function.
* Supporting assignment of tasks to targets and deconfliction in execution of operational plans in support of the mission function.
* Working with remote teams develop and/or enhance existing processes for effective assignment and tracking reporting and accountability tasks.
* Participating in the development, evaluation, updating, and maintenance of orders for the AFIN.
* This tasks include creating Maintenance Tasking Orders (MTO) as assigned
* Generating, authoring and releasing (with government approval) applicable orders based on HHQ orders/guidance designated subscribers.
* Participation in Airforce wide coordination efforts/working groups in support of orders
* Developing repeatable processes for tracking all assignments via spreadsheets, inputs and other staff documentation relevant to the actions tasked/assigned

What Does A Military Do At Centerline

* Do you have a valid CDL with military experience? We are hiring experienced military drivers to represent us and our clients with professionalism.
* Serving our country can be the best teacher for the road, and we want that dedication on our team.
* Drivers will be working with different types of freight and Centerline will work with you to determine the best type of truck for your experience and preference.
* Experienced military drivers
* Full-time and part-time work
* Endorsements are a plus
* Local jobs and balanced home life
* May be required to assist in loading and unloading
* We are an equal opportunity employer and all qualified candidates will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, sexual orientation, gender identity or any other characteristic protected by law

What Does A Military Do At Chenega Corporation

* Reasonable accommodations may be made to enable individuals with disabilities to perform the essential functions of this position)
* Partners with and augments activities of Service Family Centers, Guard and Reserve programs (including Inter
* Service Family Assistance Committees), unit family support staff officers, and other programs and services to build coalitions and connect Federal, state, and local resources and non-profit organizations to support Active Duty, Guard and Reserve families.
* Identifies family needs and provides a “get-well” plan in compliance with non-medical counseling scope.
* Provides face-to-face non-medical problem solving counseling to families when other resources are not available and makes appropriate referrals and warm transfers to military and community resources according to the needs of families and service members, including the following activities:
* o Consults with military commands and installation service providers as requested.
* o Develops and/or uses approved training and education programs and materials and advises on requests for new or revised presentations by military leadership.
* o Provides client tracking of services performed and referrals made using appropriate reporting system.
* May assist with counselor interviewing process.
* May advise on curriculum development for delivery of service and in response to new presentation requests from military leadership.
* Non
* Essential Duties:
* Other duties as assigned
* Supervisory Responsibilities:
* NONE

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How To Become A Military

Most airline pilots begin their careers as commercial pilots. Commercial pilots typically need a high school diploma or equivalent. Airline pilots typically need a bachelor’s degree. All pilots who are paid to fly must have at least a commercial pilot’s license from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). In addition, airline pilots must have the Airline Transport Pilot (ATP) certificate. The ATP certificate, and instrument and multiengine ratings expand the privileges granted by the commercial pilot’s license and may be required by certain employers.

Most pilots begin their flight training with independent instructors or through flight schools. Fixed base operators (FBO) usually provide a wide range of general aviation services, such as aircraft fueling, maintenance, and on-demand air transportation services, and they may also offer flight training. An FBO may manage a flight school or call its training department a school. Some flight schools are parts of 2- and 4-year colleges and universities.

Education and Training

Airline pilots typically need a bachelor’s degree in any subject, along with a commercial pilot’s license and an ATP certificate from the FAA. Airline pilots typically start their careers in flying as commercial pilots. Pilots usually accrue thousands of hours of flight experience to get a job with regional or major airlines.

The military traditionally has been an important source of experienced pilots because of the extensive training it provides. However, increased duty requirements have reduced the incentives for these pilots to transfer out of military aviation and into civilian aviation. Most military pilots who transfer to civilian aviation are able to transfer directly into the airlines rather than working in commercial aviation.

Commercial pilots must have a commercial pilot’s license and typically need a high school diploma or the equivalent. Some employers have additional requirements. For example, agricultural pilots need to have an understanding of common agricultural practices, fertilizers, fungicides, herbicides, and pesticides. Flight instructors have to have special FAA-issued certificates and ratings, such as Certified Flight Instructor (CFI), CFI-Instrument (CFII), Multi-Engine Instructor (MEI), MEI-Instrument (MEII), and possibly others. Many additional requirements exist for other specialties. They range from being able to operate gliders and tow banners to being qualified to fly helicopters and airships.

Commercial pilots typically begin their flight training with independent FAA-certified flight instructors or at schools that offer flight training. The FAA certifies hundreds of civilian flight schools, which range from small FBOs to large state universities. Some colleges and universities offer pilot training as part of a 2- or 4-year aviation degree. Regardless of whether pilots attend flight schools or learn from independent instructors, all pilots need the FAA’s commercial pilot license before they can be paid to fly. In addition, most commercial pilots need an instrument rating, typically to fly through clouds or other conditions that limit visibility. An instrument rating also is required to carry paying passengers more than 50 miles from the point of origin of their flight or at night.

Interviews for positions with major and regional airlines often reflect the FAA exams for pilot licenses, certificates, and instrument ratings, and can be intense. Airlines frequently will conduct their own psychological and aptitude tests in order to make sure that their pilots are of good moral character and can make good decisions under pressure.

Airline and commercial pilots who are newly hired by airlines or on-demand air services companies must undergo moderate-term on-the-job training in accordance with Federal Aviation Regulations (FARs). This training usually includes 6–8 weeks of ground school and 25 hours of flight time. In addition, commercial pilots may need specific training based on the type of flying they are doing. For example, those who tow banners will likely need at least 200 hours in airplanes with conventional (tailwheel) landing gear. Further, various types of ratings for specific aircraft, such as the Boeing 737 or Cessna Citation, typically are acquired through employer-based training and generally are earned by pilots who have at least a commercial license.

Besides initial training and licensing requirements, all pilots must maintain their experience in performing certain maneuvers. This requirement means that pilots must perform specific maneuvers and procedures a given number of times within a specified amount of time. Furthermore, pilots must undergo periodic training and medical examinations, generally every year or every other year.

Work Experience in a Related Occupation

Airline pilots typically begin their careers as commercial pilots. Pilots usually accrue thousands of hours of flight experience as commercial pilots or in the military to get a job with regional or major airlines.

Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations

Those who are seeking a career as a professional pilot typically get their licenses and ratings in the following order:

  • Student Pilot Certificate
  • Private Pilot License
  • Instrument Rating
  • Commercial Pilot License
  • Multi-Engine Rating
  • Airline Transport Pilot Certificate

Each certificate and rating requires that pilots pass a written exam on the ground and a practical flying exam, usually called a check ride, in an appropriate aircraft. In addition to earning these licenses, many pilots get Certified Flight Instructor (CFI) rating after they get their commercial certificate. The CFI rating helps them build flight time and experience more quickly and at less personal expense. Current licensing regulations can be found in FARs.

Commercial pilot license. To qualify for a commercial pilot license, applicants must be at least 18 years old and meet certain flight-hour requirements. When student pilots first begin their training, they need to get a logbook and keep detailed records of their flight time. Also, their school may require them to log their ground instruction time. The logbook must be endorsed by the flight instructor in order for the student to be able to take the FAA knowledge and practical exams. For specific requirements, including details on the types and quantities of flight experience and knowledge requirements, see the FARs. Part 61 of Title 14 of the code of federal regulations (14 CFR part 61) covers the basic rules for the certification of pilots. Flight schools can train pilots in accordance with the rules from part 61 or the rules found in 14 CFR part 141.

In addition, applicants must pass the appropriate medical exam, meet all of the detailed flight experience and knowledge requirements, and pass a written exam and a practical flight exam in order to become commercially licensed. The physical exam confirms that the pilot’s vision is correctable to 20/20 and that no physical handicaps exist that could impair the pilot’s performance.

Commercial pilots must hold an instrument rating if they want to carry passengers for pay more than 50 miles from the point of origin of their flight or at night.

Instrument rating. Earning their instrument rating enables pilots to fly during periods of low visibility, also known as instrument meteorological conditions or IMC. They may qualify for this rating by having at least 40 hours of instrument flight experience and 50 hours of cross-country flight time as pilot in command and by meeting other requirements detailed in the FARs.

Airline transport pilot (ATP) certification. Beginning in 2013, all pilot crews of a scheduled commercial airliner must have ATP certificates. To earn the ATP certificate, applicants must be at least 23 years old, have a minimum of 1,500 hours of flight time, and pass written and practical flight exams. Furthermore, airline pilots usually maintain one or more aircraft-type ratings, which allow them to fly aircraft that require specific training, depending on the requirements of their particular airline. Some exceptions and alternative requirements are detailed in the FARs.

Pilots must pass periodic physical and practical flight examinations to be able to perform the duties granted by their certificate.

Other Experience

Minimum time requirements to get a certificate or rating may not be enough to get some jobs. To make up the gap between paying for training and flying for the major airlines, many commercial pilots begin their careers as flight instructors and on-demand charter pilots. These positions typically require less experience than airline jobs require. When pilots have built enough flying hours, they can apply to the airlines. Newly hired pilots at regional airlines typically have about 2,000 hours of flight experience. Newly hired pilots at major airlines typically have about 4,000 hours of flight experience. Many commercial piloting jobs have minimum requirements of around 500 hours. Numerous factors can affect this number, such as the type of flight time the pilot has.

Important Qualities

Communication skills. Pilots must speak clearly when conveying information to air traffic controllers and other crew members. They must also listen carefully for instructions.

Observational skills. Pilots must regularly watch over screens, gauges, and dials to make sure that all systems are in working order. They also need to maintain situational awareness by looking for other aircraft or obstacles. Pilots must be able to see clearly, be able to judge the distance between objects, and possess good color vision.

Problem-solving skills. Pilots must be able to identify complex problems and figure out appropriate solutions. When a plane encounters turbulence, for example, pilots may assess the weather conditions and request a change in route or altitude from air traffic control.

Quick reaction time. Pilots must be able to respond quickly, and with good judgment, to any impending danger, because warning signals can appear with no notice.

Advancement

For airline pilots, advancement depends on a system of seniority outlined in collective bargaining contracts. Typically, after 1 to 5 years, flight engineers may advance to first officer positions and, after 5 to 15 years, first officers can become captains. In large companies, a captain could become a chief pilot or a director of aviation.

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Top Skills for A Military

CivilianPersonnelCombatProceduresSafetyCommanderEAPAssistanceLogisticalSupportVehicleHonorableDischargeConductMedalEmergencyAdvisorCustomerServiceAccountabilityPolicyClearanceFacilityAdditionalLawEnforcement

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Top Military Skills

  1. Civilian Personnel
  2. Combat
  3. Procedures
You can check out examples of real life uses of top skills on resumes here:
  • Manage the daily arrival and departure of inbound and outbound US Military Coalition Forces, Private Security Companies and Civilian personnel.
  • Performed as a member of a fire team during drills and combat.
  • Helped devise procedures to reduce claims exposure and participated in risk management committee.
  • Performed hazard analysis, evaluates explosive and safety hazards, and reviews safety site plans.
  • Rated by the US Southern Command Deputy Commander as #1 of 20 peers throughout Latin America.

Top Military Employers

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What Kind Of Companies Hire a Military

  1. United States Air Force
  2. United States Marine Repair Inc
  3. Northrop Grumman
  4. U.S. Navy
  5. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
  6. U.S. Air Force
  7. International Sports Sciences Association (ISSA)
  8. Recruiting Station
  9. University of Phoenix
  10. Leadership Development Assessment Course
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