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Working As A Music Teacher

  • Training and Teaching Others
  • Thinking Creatively
  • Organizing, Planning, and Prioritizing Work
  • Coaching and Developing Others
  • Documenting/Recording Information
  • Deal with People

  • Make Decisions

  • Stressful

  • $51,000

    Average Salary

What Does A Music Teacher Do

Kindergarten and elementary school teachers prepare younger students for future schooling by teaching them basic subjects such as math and reading. 

Duties

Kindergarten and elementary school teachers typically do the following:

  • Create lesson plans to teach students subjects, such as reading, science, social studies, and math
  • Teach students how to study and communicate with others
  • Observe students to evaluate their abilities, strengths, and weaknesses
  • Teach lessons they have planned to an entire class of students or to smaller groups
  • Grade students’ assignments to monitor their progress
  • Communicate with parents about their child’s progress
  • Work with students individually to help them overcome specific learning challenges
  • Prepare students for standardized tests required by the state
  • Develop and enforce classroom rules to teach children proper behavior
  • Supervise children outside of the classroom—for example, during lunchtime or recess

Kindergarten and elementary school teachers help students learn and apply important concepts. Many teachers use a hands-on approach to help students understand abstract concepts, solve problems, and develop critical thinking skills. For example, they may demonstrate how to do a science experiment and then have the students conduct the experiment themselves. They may have students work together to learn how to collaborate to solve problems.

Kindergarten and elementary school teachers generally teach kindergarten through fourth or fifth grade. However, in some schools, elementary school teachers may teach sixth, seventh, and eighth grade. They typically teach students several subjects throughout the day.

Some teachers may teach in a multilevel classroom that includes students across two or more grades. They may teach the same group of students for several years.

Kindergarten and elementary school students spend most of their day in one classroom. Teachers may escort students to assemblies; to classes taught by other teachers, such as art or music; or to recess. While students are away from the classroom, teachers plan lessons, grade assignments, or meet with other teachers and staff.

In some schools, teachers may work in subject specialization teams in which they teach one or two specific subjects, either English and social studies or math and science. Generally, students spend half their time with one teacher and half their time with the other.

Some kindergarten and elementary school teachers teach special classes, such as art, music, and physical education.

Some schools employ teachers of English as a second language (ESL) or English for speakers of other languages (ESOL). Both of these types of teachers work exclusively with students who are learning the English language, often referred to as English language learners (ELLs). The teachers work with students individually or in groups to help them improve their English language skills and to help them with assignments from other classes.

Students with learning disabilities or emotional or behavioral disorders are often taught in traditional classes. Kindergarten and elementary teachers work with special education teachers to adapt lesson plans to these students’ needs and monitor the students’ progress. In some cases, kindergarten and elementary school teachers may co-teach lessons with special education teachers.

Some teachers maintain websites to communicate with parents about students’ assignments, upcoming events, and grades. For students in higher grades, teachers may create websites or discussion boards to present information or to expand on a lesson taught in class.

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How To Become A Music Teacher

Kindergarten and elementary school teachers must have a bachelor’s degree. In addition, public school teachers must have a state-issued certification or license.

Education

All states require public kindergarten and elementary school teachers to have at least a bachelor’s degree in elementary education. Some states also require kindergarten and elementary school teachers to major in a content area, such as math or science. They typically enroll in their college’s teacher preparation program and also take classes in education and child psychology in addition to those required by their major.

In teacher education programs, future teachers learn how to present information to young students and how to work with young students of varying abilities and backgrounds. Programs typically include fieldwork, such as student teaching. For information about teacher preparation programs in your state, visit teach.org.

Some states require all teachers to earn a master’s degree after receiving their teaching certification.

Private schools typically seek kindergarten and elementary school teachers who have a bachelor’s degree in elementary education.

Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations

All states require teachers in public schools to be licensed or certified. Those who teach in private schools are generally not required to be licensed. Most states require teachers to pass a background check.

Kindergarten and elementary school teachers are typically certified to teach early childhood grades, which are usually preschool through third grade, or elementary school grades, which are usually first through sixth grades or first through eighth grades.

Requirements for certification vary by state. In addition to earning a bachelor’s degree, they are required to complete a teacher preparation program and supervised experience in teaching, typically gained through student teaching. Some states require a minimum grade point average. States often require candidates to pass a general teaching certification test, as well as a test that demonstrates their knowledge of the subject they will teach. Although kindergarten and elementary school teachers typically do not teach only a single subject, they may be required to pass a content area test to earn their certification. For information on certification requirements in your state, visit teach.org.

Teachers are frequently required to complete annual professional development classes to keep their license. Some states require teachers to complete a master’s degree after receiving their certification.

All states offer an alternative route to certification for people who already have a bachelor’s degree but lack the education courses required for certification. Some alternative certification programs allow candidates to begin teaching immediately after graduation, under the supervision of an experienced teacher. These programs cover teaching methods and child development. After they complete the program, candidates are awarded full certification. Other programs require students to take classes in education before they can teach. Students may be awarded a master’s degree after completing one of these programs.

Training

In order to receive certification, teachers need to undergo a period of fieldwork, commonly referred to as student teaching. During student teaching, they work with a mentor teacher and get experience teaching students in a classroom setting. The amount of time required varies by state.

Important Qualities

Communication skills. Teachers must collaborate with teacher assistants and special education teachers. In addition, they need to discuss students’ needs with parents and administrators.

Creativity. Kindergarten and elementary school teachers must plan lessons that engage young students, adapting the lessons to different learning styles.

Patience. Working with students of different abilities and backgrounds can be difficult. Kindergarten and elementary school teachers must respond with patience when students struggle with material.

Physical stamina. Working with kindergarten and elementary-aged students can be tiring. Teachers need to be able to physically, mentally, and emotionally keep up with the students.

Resourcefulness. Kindergarten and elementary school teachers need to be able to explain difficult concepts in terms that young students can understand. In addition, they must be able to get students engaged in learning and adapt their lessons to meet students’ needs.

Advancement

Experienced teachers can advance to serve as mentors to newer teachers or to become lead teachers. In these roles, they help less experienced teachers to improve their teaching skills.

With additional education or certification, teachers may become school counselors, school librarians, or instructional coordinators. Some become assistant principals or principals, both of which generally require additional schooling in education administration or leadership.

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Music Teacher Career Paths

Music Teacher
Adjunct Professor Principal Director
Education Director
7 Yearsyrs
Adjunct Professor Assistant Principal
Elementary School Principal
12 Yearsyrs
Adjunct Professor Project Manager Director
Founder And Director
6 Yearsyrs
Kindergarten Teacher Lead Teacher
Lead Pre-K Teacher
5 Yearsyrs
Kindergarten Teacher Special Education Teacher Lead Teacher
Assistant Principal
10 Yearsyrs
Kindergarten Teacher Lead Teacher Assistant Principal
School Principal
10 Yearsyrs
Art Teacher Special Education Teacher Adjunct Instructor
Department Chairperson
7 Yearsyrs
Art Teacher Designer Principal
Athletic Director
5 Yearsyrs
Art Teacher Adjunct Instructor Principal
High School Principal
9 Yearsyrs
Coach Administrator Assistant Principal
Middle School Principal
11 Yearsyrs
Coach Team Leader Assistant Director
School Director
6 Yearsyrs
Coach Adjunct Faculty Education Consultant
Educational Manager
7 Yearsyrs
Special Education Teacher Special Education Supervisor
Director Of Special Education
11 Yearsyrs
Adjunct Instructor Department Chairperson Education Director
Director Of Instruction
7 Yearsyrs
Adjunct Faculty Assistant Professor Department Chairperson
Vice Principal
8 Yearsyrs
Adjunct Faculty Education Consultant
Student Dean
7 Yearsyrs
Private Tutor Special Education Assistant Early Childhood Special Educator
Early Childhood Specialist
5 Yearsyrs
Math Teacher Education Consultant Elementary School Principal
Curriculum Director
8 Yearsyrs
Math Teacher Faculty Department Chairperson
Academic Director
7 Yearsyrs
Math Teacher Guidance Counselor High School Assistant Principal
Elementary Assistant Principal
11 Yearsyrs
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Do you work as a Music Teacher?

Average Yearly Salary
$51,000
Show Salaries
$35,000
Min 10%
$51,000
Median 50%
$51,000
Median 50%
$51,000
Median 50%
$51,000
Median 50%
$51,000
Median 50%
$51,000
Median 50%
$51,000
Median 50%
$73,000
Max 90%
Best Paying Company
University of Washington
Highest Paying City
Boston, MA
Highest Paying State
Massachusetts
Avg Experience Level
4.3 years
How much does a Music Teacher make at top companies?
The national average salary for a Music Teacher in the United States is $51,420 per year or $25 per hour. Those in the bottom 10 percent make under $35,000 a year, and the top 10 percent make over $73,000.

The largest raises come from changing jobs.

See what's out there.

Real Music Teacher Salaries

Job Title Company Location Start Date Salary
Music Teacher Legato Music School Jul 20, 2015 $104,350
Classroom Music Teacher Community School of Music and Arts Aug 09, 2016 $88,781
Classroom Music Teacher Community School of Music and Arts Sep 15, 2015 $84,398
Music Teacher Larchmont Music Academy, Ltd. Oct 26, 2015 $83,480
Music Teacher The Browning School Aug 30, 2016 $79,000
Music Teacher Happy Mozart Music School, LLC Jan 01, 2015 $78,263
Music Teacher CJC Music School LLC Feb 12, 2016 $77,605
Music Teacher Brooklyn Conservatory of Music Oct 26, 2015 $75,132
Music Teacher Miami Chinese Language School Apr 07, 2015 $73,507 -
$99,180
Music Teacher CJC Music School LLC Jan 07, 2016 $73,091
Music Teacher Melody Academy of Music, Inc. Aug 20, 2016 $73,045
Music Teacher Vienna String Institute May 12, 2015 $60,549
Music Teacher New York Preparatory School DBA The Dwight School Apr 27, 2015 $60,000
Music Teacher (Piano) The Academy of Fine Arts Feb 26, 2015 $59,238
Music Teacher Saint Demetrios Greek American School Sep 11, 2015 $58,880
Music Teacher J & ZF Inc. Aug 16, 2015 $57,700
Music Teacher (Piano) Northern California School of Music, Inc. Sep 01, 2015 $57,393
Music Teacher Servite High School Aug 04, 2015 $57,000
Music Teacher PUI Tak Center Jan 08, 2016 $56,349
Music Teacher New York City Department of Education Sep 01, 2015 $49,908
Kindergarten Music Teacher Anuree Kamini, Inc. (DBA: Montessori School) Oct 26, 2016 $49,720
Music Teacher Music of Opus119 Dec 05, 2016 $48,797
Music Teacher Canterbury School Aug 18, 2015 $48,717
Music Teacher Ohio Conference of Seventh-Day Adventists Aug 07, 2015 $48,648
Music Teacher New York City Department of Education Feb 12, 2015 $48,445

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Top Skills for A Music Teacher

  1. Lesson Plans
  2. Classroom Management
  3. Grade General Music
You can check out examples of real life uses of top skills on resumes here:
  • Actualized lesson plans and cultivated instrumental enlightenment and adroitness * Supplied a pleasant atmosphere and sustained an intimate relationship with students
  • Implemented various classroom management techniques for maintaining student attention, involvement and discipline, specifically differentiation.
  • Job responsibilities include teaching a 6th, 7th and 8th grade general music class along with an ELL class and chorus.
  • Authored and developed Bloomfield Middle School General Music Curriculum.
  • Revamped Honors and AP Music Theory courses and created dynamic lesson plans including relevant technology and student-centered learning.

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Top 10 Best States for Music Teachers

  1. Massachusetts
  2. Alaska
  3. Connecticut
  4. New Jersey
  5. Michigan
  6. New York
  7. Minnesota
  8. Rhode Island
  9. Illinois
  10. Pennsylvania
  • (393 jobs)
  • (29 jobs)
  • (243 jobs)
  • (535 jobs)
  • (438 jobs)
  • (432 jobs)
  • (311 jobs)
  • (16 jobs)
  • (890 jobs)
  • (267 jobs)

Music Teacher Resume Examples And Tips

The average resume reviewer spends between 5 to 7 seconds looking at a single resume, which leaves the average job applier with roughly six seconds to make a killer first impression. Thanks to this, a single typo or error on your resume can disqualify you right out of the gate. At Zippia, we went through over 12,254 Music Teacher resumes and compiled some information about how best to optimize them. Here are some suggestions based on what we found, divided by the individual sections of the resume itself.

Learn How To Create A Top Notch Music Teacher Resume

View Resume Examples

Music Teacher Demographics

Gender

Female

52.2%

Male

41.0%

Unknown

6.8%
Ethnicity

White

62.8%

Hispanic or Latino

15.0%

Black or African American

11.4%

Asian

7.3%

Unknown

3.4%
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Foreign Languages Spoken

Spanish

43.7%

French

16.9%

German

8.4%

Italian

7.4%

Chinese

4.1%

Russian

3.5%

Portuguese

3.2%

Mandarin

2.7%

Korean

2.2%

Japanese

1.4%

Hebrew

1.4%

Cantonese

0.8%

Arabic

0.8%

Polish

0.7%

Romanian

0.5%

Tagalog

0.5%

Georgian

0.5%

Ukrainian

0.4%

Armenian

0.4%

Albanian

0.4%
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Music Teacher Education

Schools

Berklee College of Music

18.3%

New York University

8.3%

University of North Texas

6.3%

Grand Canyon University

5.0%

West Chester University of Pennsylvania

4.5%

University of North Carolina at Greensboro

4.5%

Montclair State University

4.3%

VanderCook College of Music

4.3%

Arizona State University

4.2%

Temple University

4.0%

Kent State University

3.7%

University of Houston

3.7%

Manhattan School of Music

3.7%

University of Florida

3.7%

Liberty University

3.7%

Full Sail University

3.7%

Boston University

3.7%

University of the Arts

3.7%

University of Miami

3.5%

Florida State University

3.5%
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Majors

Music

32.6%

General Education, Specific Areas

25.9%

Education

10.0%

Elementary Education

5.5%

Music Performance

3.5%

Educational Leadership

2.8%

Business

2.6%

Psychology

2.4%

Theology

1.6%

Theatre

1.5%

Rehabilitation Science

1.5%

Special Education

1.4%

English

1.3%

Fine Arts

1.2%

Liberal Arts

1.2%

Early Childhood Education

1.2%

Communication

1.2%

Curriculum And Instruction

1.1%

Computer Science

0.8%

Writing

0.8%
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Degrees

Bachelors

50.1%

Masters

31.8%

Associate

5.2%

Certificate

4.8%

High School Diploma

4.0%

Doctorate

2.0%

Diploma

1.7%

License

0.4%
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Music Teacher Videos

How To Become A Music Teacher | Music Teacher Info

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Updated May 18, 2020