Network Systems Company History Timeline

1850
San Jose San Jose, city, seat 1850 of Santa Clara county, west-central California, United States It lies in the Santa Clara Valley along Coyote Creek and the Guadalupe River, about 50 miles 80 km southeast of San Francisco.
1949
Developed in 1949 for transmitting radar signals by Jack Harrington s group at the Air Force Cambridge Research Center AFCRC near Boston, the modem modulates digital data into sounds, and demodulates received sounds into digital data.
1961
Guest editor Robert Kahn, associate guest editors Keith Uncapher and Harry van Trees L. Kleinrock, Information Flow in Large Communication Nets , RLE Quarterly Progress Report, July 1961.
1962
In August 1962, Licklider and Welden Clark published one of the first descriptions of a networked future in the paper On-Line Man-Computer Communication.
1964
Although he left the IPTO in 1964, five years before the ARPANET went live, it was his vision of universal networking that provided the impetus for his successors such as Lawrence Roberts and Robert Taylor to further the ARPANET development.
1965
To explore this, in 1965 working with Thomas Merrill, Roberts connected the TX-2 computer in Mass. to the Q-32 in California with a low speed dial-up telephone line creating the first however small wide-area computer network ever built.
1966
The Merit Network was formed in 1966 as the Michigan Educational Research Information Triad to explore computer networking between three of Michigan s public universities as a means to help the state s educational and economic development.
1969
The first ARPANET link was established between the University of California, Los Angeles UCLA and the Stanford Research Institute at 22 30 hours on October 29, 1969.
1969-70 marks the start of Britain s NPL network, the wireless and more specialized ALOHANET in Hawaii also ARPA funded , and the HLN High Level Network for the SITA consortium of commercial airlines.
1972
The idea of open-architecture networking was first introduced by Kahn shortly after having arrived at DARPA in 1972.
1973
The give and take was highly productive and the first written version7of the resulting approach was distributed at a special meeting of the International Network Working Group INWG which had been set up at a conference at Sussex University in September 1973.
In 1973, the United States Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency DARPA initiated a research program to investigate techniques and technologies for interlinking packet networks of various kinds.
Other key issues that needed to be addressed were. Thus, in the spring of 1973, after starting the internetting effort, he asked Vint Cerf then at Stanford to work with him on the detailed design of the protocol.
1974
In 1974 it announces Systems Network Architecture SNA , a set of protocols designed for less centralized networks.
The company was formed by former Control Data Corporation employees, James E. Thornton and Peter D. Jones in 1974.
1976
In 1976, Kleinrock published the first book on the ARPANET. It included an emphasis on the complexity of protocols and the pitfalls they often introduce.
1977
Bolt Beranek and Newman, which had built the original IMP and designed important parts of the ARPAnet, had also been a key participant in ARPA s 1977 internetworking experiments.
1978
The first public bulletin board using personal computers and modems was written by Ward Christensen and Randy Seuss in Chicago in 1978 for the early amateur computers.
1980
During the late 1980 s, however, the population of Internet users and network constituents expanded internationally and began to include commercial facilities.
In 1980-81, two other networking projects, BITNET and CSNET, were initiated.
1981
In 1981, France Telecom offers free Minitel terminals to every phone subscriber, launching the first mass Web.
By 1981, the number of hosts had grown to 213, with a new host being added approximately every twenty days.
The associated standards for IPv4 were published by 1981 as RFCs 791, 792 and 793, and adopted for use.
In 1981 NSF supported the development of the Computer Science Network CSNET . CSNET connected with ARPANET using TCP IP, and ran TCP IP over X.25, but it also supported departments without sophisticated network connections, using automated dial-up mail exchange.
1982
Because of fears of hackers, the Dept of Defence created a new separate network, MILNet, in 1982.
1983
At its official 1983 launch, the Internet had been a modest experimental network of networks owned by the United States government.
The Internet Activities Board IAB was created in 1983 to guide the evolution of the TCP IP Protocol Suite and to provide research advice to the Internet community.
In 1983, when Barry Leiner took over management of the Internet research program at DARPA, he and Clark recognized that the continuing growth of the Internet community demanded a restructuring of the coordination mechanisms.
1984
Cisco was founded in 1984 and has its headquarters in San Jose, California.
1985
In 1985 Cisco sold its first product, a network interface card for Digital Equipment Corporation s computers.
In 1985, recognizing this lack of information availability and appropriate training, Dan Lynch in cooperation with the IAB arranged to hold a three day workshop for ALL vendors to come learn about how TCP IP worked and what it still could not do well.
The transition of ARPANET from NCP to TCP IP permitted it to be split into a MILNET supporting operational requirements and an ARPANET supporting research needs. Thus, by 1985, Internet was already well established as a technology supporting a broad community of researchers and developers, and was beginning to be used by other communities for daily computer communications.
1986
1986 Company ships its first product, a router for the TCP IP protocol suite.
Usenet is the first though mostly for geeks its discussion groups are quite popular and it gets ported to run over the Internet by 1986.
In 1986, the United States National Science Foundation NSF initiated the development of the NSFNET which, today, provides a major backbone communication service for the Internet.
1987
Sales for the fiscal year ending July 1987 were 1.5 million, and the company had only eight employees at the time.
In 1987 it became clear that a protocol was needed that would permit the elements of the network, such as the routers, to be remotely managed in a uniform way.
1988
In September of 1988 the first Interop trade show was born.
In 1988, the company began to target its internetworking routers at mainstream corporations with geographically dispersed branches that used different networks.
1988 Donald T. Valentine, a venture capitalist, gains control of the company John Morgridge is named president and CEO.
1989
At the world s biggest physics laboratory, CERN in Switzerland, English programmer and physicist Tim Berners-Lee submits two proposals for what will become the Web, starting in March of 1989.
During the course of its evolution, particularly after 1989, the Internet system began to integrate support for other protocol suites into its basic networking fabric.
10 The decommissioning of the ARPANET was commemorated on its 20th anniversary by a UCLA symposium in 1989.
When they met in San Francisco in 1989, there was a lot of activity, plus some key words emerging - connectivity and interoperability.
By 1989 ARPANet had disappeared, but the Information Superhighway was just around the corner.
1990
In February 1990, Cisco went public, after which Bosack and Lerner began selling their shares.
DEC and Xerox will also begin commercializing their own proprietary networks, DECNET and XNS. At it s peak around 1990, IBM s SNA will quietly carry most of the world's networking traffic.
Minitel will have tens of millions of users by 1990 and online services such as newspapers, train schedules, tax filing, and erotic classified ads as well as email and chat.
First Web browser-editor, 1990.
1991
Chambers, who had previous stints at IBM and Wang Laboratories before joining Cisco in 1991, stepped up the company's acquisition pace to keep ahead of its rivals and to fill in gaps in its product line, aiming to provide one-stop networking shopping to its customers.
When it is funded in 1991, the Act creates the National Information Infrastructure, which promotes and funds over 600 million worth of various networking initiatives.
1992
In 1992, Fortune magazine rated Cisco as the second fastest growing company in the United States.
Olivetti of Italy agreed to market Cisco's products under a value-added reseller agreement late in 1992.
By 1992 the Internet will have emerged as the new global standard, linking a million computers.
Later, in 1992, RIPE was formally registered as a cooperative in Amsterdam.
1993
In February 1993, Cisco announced a strategy to include ATM among the protocols supported by its products.
But with Gopher, the Web also gets a major lucky break the University of Minnesota begins charging for Gopher server licenses in 1993, literally the same spring the Web becomes officially public domain and free.
The company introduced the improved 7000 model router in 1993, and that same year it began acquiring other companies.
1994
In 1994, Cisco introduced its first ATM switch.
Most of Cisco's international sales were through distributors, whereas in the United States the majority of sales 65 percent in early 1994 were made directly to the end users.
1994 Revenues exceed 1 billion for the first time.
Also in 1994, Vice-President Al Gore supports a prominent White House Web site, as well as encouraging funding of W3C in the United States.
In 1994 the company relocated its headquarters from Menlo Park, California, to San Jose, and the following year John T. Chambers replaced Morgridge as CEO. Chambers continued to pursue the strategy of growth by acquisition.
1995
In January 1995 John T. Chambers was named CEO of Cisco, with Morgridge becoming chairman and Valentine vice-chairman.
Initially based in Saint Paul, Minnesota the company moved to Minneapolis, Minnesota after delivering their first high-speed networking computers to the NSA. It merged with Storage Technology Corporation on September 20, 1995.
Astounding Growth Under John Chambers Starting in 1995.
The first businesses to earn substantial profits on the Web are pornography and gambling sites, by 1995.
1996
The largest deal during this period, however, was that of StrataCom, Inc., a 4.67 billion acquisition completed in April 1996.
At the end of 1996, the 36 million Web users surpass the 30 million or so on France s Minitel, until now the most popular online system.
1998
The largest of these was the April 1998 purchase of NetSpeed, Inc., a specialist in digital subscriber line DSL equipment, an emerging technology providing homes and small offices with high-speed access to the Internet via existing telephone lines.
Jon Postel served as Director of the Computer Networks Division of the Information Sciences Institute of the University of Southern California until his untimely death October 16, 1998.
1998 Cisco's market capitalization passes the 100 billion mark.
1999
During 1999 Cisco also acquired GeoTel Communications Corp., a maker of software for routing telephone calls, for about 1.9 billion.
Japanese mobile phone operator NTT DoCoMo creates the i-mode networking standard for mobile data in 1999.
Blogger, launched in 1999.
2000
In June of that year, Cisco introduced a new low-end, lower-priced product line, the Cisco 2000 router family.
Rather than slowing it down, Chambers planned to increase the company's acquisition pace, with the addition of as many as 25 companies during 2000.
2000 Company's market capitalization reaches 450 billion.
In early 2000, business fundamentals reassert themselves.
2002
By 2002, over 34 million subscribers are using it on their phones for web access, e-mail, mobile payments, streaming video, and many other features that the rest of the world won't see for nearly another decade.
2004
In 2004, Google is the first major Web company to float a publicly traded stock since the go-go days of the dot-com boom.
2005
2005 The 6.9 billion acquisition of Scientific-Atlanta, Inc. is announced.
Storage Technology Corporation was purchased by Sun Microsystems during the summer of 2005.
2006
In 2006 Cisco introduced TelePresence, an elaboration of videoconferencing that is intended to allow people in different locations to interact as if they were in the same place.
2009
Sun Microsystems was purchased by Oracle Corporation on April 20, 2009.
Founded
1974
Company Founded
Founders
James Thornton,Peter Jones
Company Founders

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