Panavision Company History Timeline

1954
In 1954, Robert Gottschalk and his partners saw an opportunity to solve one of the film industry's most urgent challenges.
Since its inception in 1954, Panavision has been building long-term relationships with cinematographers, directors, and producers who are at the forefront of the television and motion picture industries.
1955
Panavision, Inc. was started in 1955 by Robert Gottschalk, a camera pioneer, to meet the needs of motion picture producers who wanted to make movies in a wide-screen format.
1957
He officially introduced the first Panavision lens in 1957.
In 1957, Ultra Panavision was ready for use before the studio was ready to begin filming Ben-Hur, so MGM used it on the film Raintree County.
1958
The Ultra Panavision 70 technology led to the 1958 unveiling of the 35mm Auto Panatar camera lens, which eliminated the distortions created by early CinemaScope lenses.
1959
In 1959 the Ultra Panavision 70 camera earned the Scientific and Engineering Award Academy Plaque . That same year, the first Super Panavision 70 feature, The Big Fisherman, was captured on 65mm film using spherical lenses with an aspect ratio of 2.20 1.
In 1959, the Ultra Panavision process was premiered with the release of Ben-Hur.
1962
Released in 1962, the film was the first credited as being filmed in Ultra Panavision 70.
1965
In 1965, Panavision was purchased by Banner Productions, headed by Sy Weintraub, which allowed Panavision to expand geographically.
1966
From 1966-69, Panavision took home three more Academy Awards for technical achievement.
1971
In 1971, Kinney was renamed Warner Communications, Inc.
1972
In 1972, the Panavision design team led by Al Mayer Sr. unveiled the Panaflex , the first 35mm, self-blimped, hand-holdable studio reflex camera.
1973
The Sugarland Express 1973 , an early Steven Speilberg film, was the first production filmed entirely with Panaflex cameras.
1976
To keep apace with advances in camera design, Panavision introduced the 35mm Super Speed lenses in 1976 earning yet another Academy Award , followed closely by the Ultra Speed Primes.
In 1976, the company developed the Panaflex Gold, an improvement over the Panaflex because of its electronic features.
1980
In the early 1980 s, Panavision had committed its full resources to developing the Panaflex Platinum camera.
1982
After Gottschalk died in 1982, a variety of owners bought and sold Panavision--notably Ted Field, the grandson of Marshall Field, founder of the large United States retail chain.
1985
Field bought Panavision in 1985 from Warner Communications for 52 million.
1987
Field sold the company in September 1987 to Britain's Lee International for 142 million.
1988
Yet the company struggled financially when camera production dropped from 25 in 1988 to a mere 15.
1990
Since 1990, the Academy recognized Panavision with two Oscars and 17 awards for scientific and technical achievement.
In 1990, Panavision incorporated to become Panavision, Inc.
1993
Panavision spent the next five years securing its place in the industry, returning to profitability in 1993.
1994
In 1994, Panavision led the investment group that established Panavision New York, a dealership with the right to inventory and rental of the company's cameras and lenses in the northeastern United States.
1995
Each of the top ten motion pictures of 1995--including Batman Forever, Apollo 13, Die Hard with a Vengeance, and Ace Ventura When Nature Calls--were filmed using Panavision systems.
In the spirit of Gottschalk, Panavision introduced a new camera system in 1995.
1996
In November 1996, Panavision offered 2.8 million shares of stock at 17 per share.
In total, Panavision manufactured 35 camera systems in 1996.
1997
In June 1997, Panavision acquired the Film Services Group of Visual Action Holdings PLC, a London-based company, for 61 million in cash.
In 1997, Panavision responded with the Millennium , a camera that re-examined every aspect of the existing 35mm technology.
Panavision released a second innovation in 1997 as well.
1999
Revenue decreased 0.8 million, or 0.6 percent, compared to 1999.
In 1999, it began collaborations with Sony to develop high definition, digital camera systems.
2000
Camera rental revenue for 2000 was 130.0 million.
In 2000, the two organizations formed a new company to supply Sony and Panavsion technology.
Officers Ronald O. Perlman, Chmn. of the Board John S. Farrand, CEO, Pres., and Dir., 58, 2000 salary 900,000 Scott L. Seybold, EVP and CFO, 56, 2000 salary 243,058 Barry F. Schwartz, EVP and Gen.
The company's 2000 employee count only represented a less-than-one-percent growth rate 0.8 over the previous year.
2001
Over the years, Panavision's large format technology has supported the artistry behind many classic films, including Ben Hur, Lawrence of Arabia, and 2001 A Space Odyssey.
Camera rental revenue for 2001 was 124.6 million.
2002
business.com. panavision information, 11 april 2002. available at http www.business.com.
Up until 2002, Chairman Ronald Perelman, who is also chairman of Revlon, owned 86 percent of the company.
Founded
1954
Company Founded
Headquarters
Los Angeles, CA
Company Headquarter
Founders
Richard Moore,Robert Gottschalk
Company Founders

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