What is a Phlebotomist

A Phlebotomist is a medical technician specializing in blood collection for donations or blood tests. Phlebotomists are responsible for analyzing blood to diagnose illnesses or nutritional deficiencies and determine the efficicacy of medication. They perform blood transfusions and manage blood donations, identifying the blood identity of donor and patient.

They label and document blood samples, keeping track of information; making sure the storage conditions are appropriate and meticulously maintaining the cleanliness of equipment.

Phlebotomists work as part of medical teams or healthcare science staff in hospitals or laboratories and interact with nervous patients regularly, so being caring and kind and putting people at ease with your calm demeanor will be a big part of your job if you decide to take this path.

What Does a Phlebotomist Do

Phlebotomists draw blood for tests, transfusions, research, or blood donations. Some of them explain their work to patients and provide assistance if patients have adverse reactions after their blood is drawn.

Learn more about what a Phlebotomist does

How To Become a Phlebotomist

Phlebotomists typically enter the occupation with a postsecondary nondegree award from a phlebotomy program. Almost all employers look for phlebotomists who have earned professional certification.

Education and Training

Phlebotomists typically enter the occupation with a postsecondary nondegree award from a phlebotomy program. Programs are available from community colleges, vocational schools, or technical schools. These programs usually take less than 1 year to complete and lead to a certificate or diploma. Programs have classroom sessions and laboratory work and include instruction in anatomy, physiology, and medical terminology. Phlebotomists also learn specific procedures on how to identify, label, and track blood samples.

Many phlebotomists enter the occupation with a high school diploma and are trained to be a phlebotomist on the job.

Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations

Almost all employers prefer to hire phlebotomists who have earned professional certification.

Several organizations offer certifications for phlebotomists. The National Center for Competency Testing (NCCT), National Healthcareer Association (NHA), the American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP), and the American Medical Technologists (AMT) offer Phlebotomy Technician certifications.

Candidates for certification typically need some classroom education, as well as some clinical experience. Certification testing usually includes a written exam and may include practical components, such as drawing blood. Requirements vary by certifying organization. California, Louisiana, Nevada, and Washington require their phlebotomists to be certified.

Important Qualities

Compassion. Some patients or clients are afraid of having their blood drawn, so phlebotomists should be caring in performing their duties.

Detail oriented. Phlebotomists must draw the correct vials of blood for the tests ordered, track vials of blood, and enter data into a database. Attention to detail is necessary; otherwise, the specimens may be misplaced or lost, or a patient may be injured.

Dexterity. Phlebotomists work with their hands, and they must be able to use their equipment efficiently and properly.

Hand–eye coordination. Phlebotomists draw blood from many patients, and they must perform their duties successfully on the first attempt, or their patients will experience discomfort.

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And if you’re looking for a job, here are the five top employers hiring now:

  1. Quest Diagnostics Jobs (3,109)
  2. Good Samaritan Hospital Jobs (151)
  3. Aerotek Jobs (371)
  4. Oklahoma Blood Institute Jobs (162)
  5. Sonora Quest Laboratories Jobs (300)
Average Salary
$34,531
Average Salary
Job Growth Rate
23%
Job Growth Rate
Job Openings
174,405
Job Openings
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Average Salary for a Phlebotomist

Phlebotomists in America make an average salary of $34,531 per year or $17 per hour. The top 10 percent makes over $42,000 per year, while the bottom 10 percent under $28,000 per year.
Average Salary
$34,531
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12 Phlebotomist Resume Examples

Learn How To Write a Phlebotomist Resume

At Zippia, we went through countless Phlebotomist resumes and compiled some information about how to optimize them. Here are some suggestions based on what we found, divided by the individual sections of the resume itself.

View Phlebotomist Resume Examples And Templates

And if you’re looking for a job, here are the five top employers hiring now:

  1. Quest Diagnostics Jobs (3,109)
  2. Good Samaritan Hospital Jobs (151)
  3. Aerotek Jobs (371)
  4. Oklahoma Blood Institute Jobs (162)
  5. Sonora Quest Laboratories Jobs (300)

Choose From 10+ Customizable Phlebotomist Resume templates

Zippia allows you to choose from different easy-to-use Phlebotomist templates, and provides you with expert advice. Using the templates, you can rest assured that the structure and format of your Phlebotomist resume is top notch. Choose a template with the colors, fonts & text sizes that are appropriate for your industry.

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Phlebotomist Demographics

Phlebotomist Gender Statistics

female

83.3 %

male

16.7 %

Phlebotomist Ethnicity Statistics

White

57.8 %

Hispanic or Latino

19.9 %

Black or African American

12.2 %

Phlebotomist Foreign Languages Spoken Statistics

Spanish

75.1 %

French

5.1 %

Russian

2.5 %
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Phlebotomist Education

Phlebotomist Majors

15.3 %

Phlebotomist Degrees

Certificate

30.7 %

Associate

22.2 %

Bachelors

15.9 %
Job Openings

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Online Courses For Phlebotomist That You May Like

Vital Signs: Understanding What the Body Is Telling Us
coursera

The vital signs - heart rate, blood pressure, body temperature, respiration rate, and pain - communicate important information about the physiological status of the human body. In this six-part course we explore the anatomy and physiology underlying the vital signs so that you will develop a systematic, integrated understanding of how the body functions. Relevant body systems are reviewed including cardiovascular and respiratory, followed by explanations of how the function of these systems affe...

PrEParing: PrEP for Providers and Patients
coursera

Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) using the antiretroviral medication emtricitibine/tenofovir approved in countries around the world is a highly effective means of reducing transmission of HIV through sexual encounters and needle sharing. This Johns Hopkins University course PrEPares you with essential information, concepts and practical advice regarding PrEP from leaders in the field. A first of its kind learning opportunity, both providers and patients learn from the same experts through content...

Patient Safety and Quality Improvement: Developing a Systems View (Patient Safety I)
coursera

In this course, you will be able develop a systems view for patient safety and quality improvement in healthcare. By then end of this course, you will be able to: 1) Describe a minimum of four key events in the history of patient safety and quality improvement, 2) define the key characteristics of high reliability organizations, and 3) explain the benefits of having strategies for both proactive and reactive systems thinking...

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Top Skills For a Phlebotomist

The skills section on your resume can be almost as important as the experience section, so you want it to be an accurate portrayal of what you can do. Luckily, we've found all of the skills you'll need so even if you don't have these skills yet, you know what you need to work on. Out of all the resumes we looked through, 15.8% of Phlebotomists listed Specimen Collection on their resume, but soft skills such as Compassion and Dexterity are important as well.

  • Specimen Collection, 15.8%
  • Patient Care, 12.0%
  • Customer Service, 11.3%
  • Blood Samples, 9.9%
  • Data Entry, 6.2%
  • Other Skills, 44.8%

Best States For a Phlebotomist

Some places are better than others when it comes to starting a career as a Phlebotomist. The best states for people in this position are California, Massachusetts, New York, and Connecticut. Phlebotomists make the most in California with an average salary of $41,627. Whereas in Massachusetts and New York, they would average $40,940 and $40,577, respectively. While Phlebotomists would only make an average of $40,276 in Connecticut, you would still make more there than in the rest of the country. We determined these as the best states based on job availability and pay. By finding the median salary, cost of living, and using the Bureau of Labor Statistics' Location Quotient, we narrowed down our list of states to these four.

1. Massachusetts

Total Phlebotomist Jobs:
2,871
Highest 10% Earn:
$50,000
Location Quotient:
1.41
Location Quotient is a measure used by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) to determine how concentrated a certain industry is in a single state compared to the nation as a whole. You can read more about how BLS calculates location quotients here

2. New Hampshire

Total Phlebotomist Jobs:
635
Highest 10% Earn:
$46,000
Location Quotient:
1.64
Location Quotient is a measure used by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) to determine how concentrated a certain industry is in a single state compared to the nation as a whole. You can read more about how BLS calculates location quotients here

3. Connecticut

Total Phlebotomist Jobs:
1,133
Highest 10% Earn:
$50,000
Location Quotient:
1.54
Location Quotient is a measure used by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) to determine how concentrated a certain industry is in a single state compared to the nation as a whole. You can read more about how BLS calculates location quotients here
Full List Of Best States For Phlebotomists

How Do Phlebotomist Rate Their Jobs?

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5.0

National Certified PhlebotomistJune 2019

5.0

Zippia Official LogoNational Certified PhlebotomistJune 2019

What do you like the most about working as Phlebotomist?

Patient care and following regulations of lab draws for the best result outcome for the patients. Show More

What do you NOT like?

I haven't experience not liking being the the laboratory setting, everyday is a new learning experience for me. Show More

Zippia Official Logo

2.0

TruthMay 2019

2.0

Zippia Official LogoTruthMay 2019

What do you like the most about working as Phlebotomist?

Making great impact in many people lives. Open my eye to improve myself .I think if want be nuse or active in medical field you should start here. Show More

What do you NOT like?

Being over work / it hard to help each pt if you have so many to do. They paid should be more . Show More

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Becoming a Phlebotomist FAQs

Do phlebotomists get paid well?

No, phlebotomists do not get paid well. A full-time phlebotomist earns around $31,425 a year. This salary can range from as low as $27,000 to $58,000 a year.

Factors such as the number of years of experience impact earning potential for a phlebotomist. For example, a phlebotomist just starting earns around $31,424, but after ten years of experience average around $36,200 a year.

Other factors that determine how much a phlebotomist can make include the location of the job and the type of company. For example, a phlebotomist working in Chicago, IL, or New York, NY, can expect to earn over $50,000 a year. Whereas, if you work in Miami, FL, or Atlanta, GA, you can expect to reach closer to $40,000 a year.

Phlebotomists working at Kaiser Permanente, EMSI, NorthShore University HealthSystem, Quest Diagnostics, and APPS Paramedical can earn between $45,000 to $50,000 a year.

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How hard is it to become a phlebotomist?

No, it is not hard to become a phlebotomist. However, it does require lots of training and practice. You can become a phlebotomist in only several weeks. A handful of states need a phlebotomist to have certification.

Phlebotomists learn primarily through on-the-job training, where they can gain practical experience drawing blood. This job may be difficult for individuals who are sensitive to the sight of bodily fluids.

Having a certification, although not typically required, can help to land a job as a phlebotomist. Several organizations offer certification, including the National Phlebotomy Association, the American Society for Clinical Pathology, and American Medical Technologists.

Prerequisites are different for each organization and may include formal classroom instruction, job site training, or a combination of training in a related field with hands-on experience. Usually, candidates must document at least 100 successful vein and skin punctures.

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How long does it take to learn to be a phlebotomist?

It takes several weeks to a few months to learn to be a phlebotomist. The phlebotomy training program is brief and usually practical. Only four states require phlebotomy certification.

A high school diploma or equivalent is the usual qualification. You can usually find local community and vocational colleges that offer certificate programs or some clinics or hospitals that provide training on the job. Sometimes a company will provide the training, which usually lasts a month or two.

Phlebotomists must understand the mechanics of drawing blood samples from a vein or more minor smears from a skin puncture. They must also clearly understand how to avoid contaminating samples and maintain them at safe storage temperatures. Blood and needles are potential biohazards and must be handled appropriately to ensure patient and phlebotomists' safety.

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What is the highest-paid phlebotomist?

The highest-paid phlebotomist are those who work at insurance carriers. Phlebotomists working at insurance carriers earn an average of $41,350 a year, which is $5,000 more than the national average ($36,320 a year). The type of company and the phlebotomist position also impacts earning potential.

The Top Companies For Phlebotomists In The United States:

  • Kaiser Permanente - $48,863 per year

  • EMSI - $48,534 per year

  • NorthShore University HealthSystem - $46,355 per year

  • Quest Diagnostics - $45,774 per year

  • APPS Paramedical - $45,654 per year

The Highest-Paid Types Of Phlebotomist Positions:

  • Head of hospital phlebotomist - $88,455 a year ($42.53 an hour)

  • Contract traveling phlebotomist - $87,774 a year ($42.20 an hour)

  • Home based hospital phlebotomist - $85,357 a year ($41.04 an hour)

  • Director hospital phlebotomist - $76,243 a year ($36.66 an hour)

  • Work from home office phlebotomist - $72,745 a year ($34.97 an hour)

  • Outpatient care centers - $42,310 per year

  • Medical and diagnostic laboratories - $38,170 per year

  • All other ambulatory healthcare services - $34,790 per year

  • Offices of physicians - $35,530 per year

  • Hospitals; state, local, and private - $34,880 per year

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What qualifications do I need to become a phlebotomist?

The qualifications needed to become a phlebotomist vary from state to state, but in most cases, completion of a phlebotomy certification is required.

A phlebotomist is an allied health care professional educated and trained in all aspects of the venipuncture (AKA procedures involving drawing blood) and its processes.

In some states, you can begin working as a phlebotomist, while other states require certification. It is recommended to complete a phlebotomist program, which can take a few weeks to one year to meet.

Phlebotomy Programs Will Usually Require:

  • Filling out an application

  • Proof of having graduated and having earned a minimum GPA

  • Immunization records

  • CPR certification

  • Passing a background check.

  • It's helpful to have taken science-based classes, as many of the courses you will take in school will focus on anatomy and medical terminology

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What type of education is required for a phlebotomist?

The type of education required for a phlebotomist is a high school diploma. While you can begin working with just a high school degree, many phlebotomists complete certification or phlebotomy programs, which can help make it easier to land a job.

Phlebotomy programs generally take about a year to complete, though some students can complete their program in less time. These programs include both classwork and hands-on training.

Coursework will provide valuable information on the phlebotomists' role, the standards and codes that need to be adhered to, blood sample collection methods, site collection, labeling and storage, and patient health and safety.

While certification is not required in all states, it does increase employability. California, Louisiana, Nevada, and Washington do need phlebotomists to hold a certificate.

Three Levels of Certification Within A Phlebotomist Program:

  • Limited Phlebotomy Technician (LPT) - Authorized to perform skin puncture blood collection

  • Certified Phlebotomy Technician I (CPT I) - Authorized to perform skin puncture and venipuncture blood collection

  • Certified Phlebotomy Technician II (CPT II) - Authorized to perform skin puncture, venipuncture, and arterial puncture blood collection

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