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Become A Physical Medicine And Rehabilitation Specialist

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Working As A Physical Medicine And Rehabilitation Specialist

  • Assisting and Caring for Others
  • Documenting/Recording Information
  • Performing General Physical Activities
  • Making Decisions and Solving Problems
  • Performing for or Working Directly with the Public
  • Deal with People

  • Make Decisions

  • Stressful

  • $84,020

    Average Salary

Example Of What A Physical Medicine And Rehabilitation Specialist does

  • Register patients for OT, PT, Psychology, Speech Pathology and EMG's.
  • Conducted competency evaluations for discharge planning purposes.
  • Achieved recognition for learning and transitioning to new hospital-wide software used for patient scheduling and notes.
  • Provided multidisciplinary assessment and treatment using osteopathic manipulative treatment, acupuncture, counseling, and medical management.
  • Accepted for poster presentation at the 2011 Association of Academic Physiatrist Annual Conference in Scottsdale, Arizona
  • Assist section supervisors, managers and their staff in interpreting instructions and in establishing actions required.
  • Developed and administered annual budgets for three departments and 27 clinical divisions.

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How To Become A Physical Medicine And Rehabilitation Specialist

Physical therapists need a Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) degree. All states require physical therapists to be licensed.

Education

In 2015, there were more than 200 programs for physical therapists accredited by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE). All programs offer a Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) degree.

DPT programs typically last 3 years. Most programs require a bachelor’s degree for admission as well as specific educational prerequisites, such as classes in anatomy, physiology, biology, chemistry, and physics. Some programs admit college freshmen into 6- or 7-year programs that allow students to graduate with both a bachelor’s degree and a DPT. Most DPT programs require applicants to apply through the Physical Therapist Centralized Application Service (PTCAS).

Physical therapist programs often include courses in biomechanics, anatomy, physiology, neuroscience, and pharmacology. Physical therapist students also complete at least 30 weeks of clinical work, during which they gain supervised experience in areas such as acute care and orthopedic care.

Physical therapists may apply to and complete a clinical residency program after graduation. Residencies typically last about 1 year and provide additional training and experience in specialty areas of care. Therapists who have completed a residency program may choose to specialize further by completing a fellowship in an advanced clinical area.

Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations

All states require physical therapists to be licensed. Licensing requirements vary by state but all include passing the National Physical Therapy Examination administered by the Federation of State Boards of Physical Therapy. Several states also require a law exam and a criminal background check. Continuing education is typically required for physical therapists to keep their license. Check with state boards for specific licensing requirements.

After gaining work experience, some physical therapists choose to become a board-certified specialist. The American Board of Physical Therapy Specialties offers certification in 8 clinical specialty areas, including orthopedics, sports, and geriatric physical therapy. Board specialist certification requires passing an exam and at least 2,000 hours of clinical work or completion of an American Physical Therapy Association (APTA)-accredited residency program in the specialty area.

Important Qualities

Compassion. Physical therapists are often drawn to the profession in part by a desire to help people. They work with people who are in pain and must have empathy for their patients.

Detail oriented. Like other healthcare providers, physical therapists should have strong analytic and observational skills to diagnose a patient’s problem, evaluate treatments, and provide safe, effective care.

Dexterity. Physical therapists must use their hands to provide manual therapy and therapeutic exercises. They should feel comfortable massaging and otherwise physically assisting patients.

Interpersonal skills. Because physical therapists spend a lot of time interacting with patients, they should enjoy working with people. They must be able to clearly explain treatment programs, motivate patients, and listen to patients’ concerns to provide effective therapy.

Physical stamina. Physical therapists spend much of their time on their feet, moving as they demonstrate proper techniques and help patients perform exercises. They should enjoy physical activity.

Resourcefulness. Physical therapists customize treatment plans for patients. They must be flexible and able to adapt plans of care to meet the needs of each patient.

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Physical Medicine And Rehabilitation Specialist jobs

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Real Physical Medicine And Rehabilitation Specialist Salaries

Job Title Company Location Start Date Salary
Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Yuma Rehabilitation Medicine LLC Yuma, AZ Feb 26, 2013 $220,000
Clinical Faculty, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation William Beaumont Hospital Royal Oak, MI Jul 01, 2015 $180,000
Instructor, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Loyola University Medical Center Maywood, IL Aug 01, 2013 $180,000
Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Appalachian Regional Healthcare, Inc. Beckley, WV Nov 01, 2013 $180,000 -
$215,000
Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Appalachian Regional Healthcare, Inc. Beckley, WV Nov 01, 2013 $175,000 -
$215,000
Physiatrist, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Paul I. Meli III, M.D., P.A. Fort Lauderdale, FL Oct 01, 2012 $175,000
Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine Resident Boston Medical Center Corporation Boston, MA Jul 01, 2010 $54,629

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Top Skills for A Physical Medicine And Rehabilitation Specialist

PhysicalMedicinePhysicalTherapyStaffOccupationalTherapyAssistanceTraumaticBrainInjuryMedicalManagementEMGRVisnDischargePlanningPsychologyJointInjectionsCerebralPalsySpinalCordInjurySportsInjuriesSpeechPathologySpineInjuriesFollow-UpAppointmentsPatientSchedulingAnnualConference

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Top Physical Medicine And Rehabilitation Specialist Skills

  1. Physical Medicine
  2. Physical Therapy Staff
  3. Occupational Therapy
You can check out examples of real life uses of top skills on resumes here:
  • Provided multidisciplinary assessment and treatment using osteopathic manipulative treatment, acupuncture, counseling, and medical management.
  • Register patients for OT, PT, Psychology, Speech Pathology and EMG's.
  • Assist section supervisors, managers and their staff in interpreting instructions and in establishing actions required.
  • Conducted competency evaluations for discharge planning purposes.
  • Achieved recognition for learning and transitioning to new hospital-wide software used for patient scheduling and notes.

Top Physical Medicine And Rehabilitation Specialist Employers

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