What is a Production Worker

If you want to get acquainted with the universe of mass production in factories, a Production Worker position is a great place to start. Production workers assist in the manufacturing of goods, typically at an assembly line or by carrying out various tasks in a warehouse. Working this job, you will feed materials into machines, assemble parts of products by hand at a production line, and monitor the equipment to guarantee the products are up to speed with the required quality standards.

You might be responsible for preparing and loading products for shipment, and you will have to make sure the production machinery is well maintained, your working area is clean, and everything is according to safety guidelines.

You have to be mechanically inclined to make the most of this job. You should be a team player and have excellent communication skills because, at the end of the day, it is the people who run the machines.

There is more than meets the eye when it comes to being a Production Worker. For example, did you know that they make an average of $14.45 an hour? That's $30,049 a year!

What Does a Production Worker Do

When it comes to the most important skills required to be a Production Worker, we found that a lot of resumes listed 12.9% of Production Workers included Production Process, while 10.2% of resumes included Assembly Line, and 9.9% of resumes included Car Parts. Hard skills like these are helpful to have when it comes to performing essential job responsibilities.

Learn more about what a Production Worker does

How To Become a Production Worker

If you're interested in becoming a Production Worker, one of the first things to consider is how much education you need. We've determined that 10.6% of Production Workers have a bachelor's degree. In terms of higher education levels, we found that 0.8% of Production Workers have master's degrees. Even though some Production Workers have a college degree, it's possible to become one with only a high school degree or GED.

Choosing the right major is always an important step when researching how to become a Production Worker. When we researched the most common majors for a Production Worker, we found that they most commonly earn High School Diploma degrees or Associate Degree degrees. Other degrees that we often see on Production Worker resumes include Diploma degrees or Bachelor's Degree degrees.

You may find that experience in other jobs will help you become a Production Worker. In fact, many Production Worker jobs require experience in a role such as Cashier. Meanwhile, many Production Workers also have previous career experience in roles such as Customer Service Representative or Sales Associate.

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Average Salary
$30,049
Average Salary
Job Openings
121,880
Job Openings
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Average Salary for a Production Worker

Production Workers in America make an average salary of $30,049 per year or $14 per hour. The top 10 percent makes over $38,000 per year, while the bottom 10 percent under $23,000 per year.
Average Salary
$30,049
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12 Production Worker Resume Examples

Learn How To Write a Production Worker Resume

At Zippia, we went through countless Production Worker resumes and compiled some information about how to optimize them. Here are some suggestions based on what we found, divided by the individual sections of the resume itself.

View Production Worker Resume Examples And Templates

And if you’re looking for a job, here are the five top employers hiring now:

  1. Butterball Jobs (293)
  2. Amazon Jobs (419)
  3. Johnson Controls Jobs (486)
  4. Smithfield Foods Jobs (713)
  5. Cargill Jobs (304)

Choose From 10+ Customizable Production Worker Resume templates

Zippia allows you to choose from different easy-to-use Production Worker templates, and provides you with expert advice. Using the templates, you can rest assured that the structure and format of your Production Worker resume is top notch. Choose a template with the colors, fonts & text sizes that are appropriate for your industry.

Production Worker Resume
Production Worker Resume
Production Worker Resume
Production Worker Resume
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Production Worker Resume

Production Worker Demographics

Production Worker Gender Statistics

male

56.3 %

female

43.7 %

Production Worker Ethnicity Statistics

White

67.5 %

Hispanic or Latino

12.3 %

Black or African American

11.0 %

Production Worker Foreign Languages Spoken Statistics

Spanish

81.2 %

French

4.3 %

German

2.1 %
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Production Worker Education

Production Worker Majors

21.7 %

Production Worker Degrees

High School Diploma

52.3 %

Associate

15.6 %

Diploma

14.7 %
Job Openings

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Online Courses For Production Worker That You May Like

The Production Part Approval Process (PPAP)
udemy
4.6
(483)

Capturing the Product and Process Design...

Product and Service Management
udemy
4.2
(935)

Know the Work that is Involved in Getting a Product Onto the Shelf and a Service Ready for Effective Delivery...

Advanced Product Management: Leadership & Communication
udemy
4.5
(1,380)

Accelerate your Product Management career. Master communication, people management, & leadership...

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Top Skills For a Production Worker

Best States For a Production Worker

Some places are better than others when it comes to starting a career as a Production Worker. The best states for people in this position are Washington, Vermont, Oregon, and Massachusetts. Production Workers make the most in Washington with an average salary of $37,823. Whereas in Vermont and Oregon, they would average $35,222 and $35,040, respectively. While Production Workers would only make an average of $34,990 in Massachusetts, you would still make more there than in the rest of the country. We determined these as the best states based on job availability and pay. By finding the median salary, cost of living, and using the Bureau of Labor Statistics' Location Quotient, we narrowed down our list of states to these four.

1. Washington

Total Production Worker Jobs:
1,428
Highest 10% Earn:
$44,000
Location Quotient:
1
Location Quotient is a measure used by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) to determine how concentrated a certain industry is in a single state compared to the nation as a whole. You can read more about how BLS calculates location quotients here

2. Ohio

Total Production Worker Jobs:
2,602
Highest 10% Earn:
$41,000
Location Quotient:
1.3
Location Quotient is a measure used by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) to determine how concentrated a certain industry is in a single state compared to the nation as a whole. You can read more about how BLS calculates location quotients here

3. Missouri

Total Production Worker Jobs:
1,470
Highest 10% Earn:
$42,000
Location Quotient:
1.28
Location Quotient is a measure used by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) to determine how concentrated a certain industry is in a single state compared to the nation as a whole. You can read more about how BLS calculates location quotients here
Full List Of Best States For Production Workers

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Top Production Worker Employers

Most Common Employers For Production Worker

RankCompanyZippia ScoreAverage Production Worker SalaryAverage Salary
1$33,393
2$32,616
3$32,356
4$32,025
5$31,843
6$31,817

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Becoming a Production Worker FAQs

How long does it take to become a Production Worker?

It takes 3 years of professional experience to become a production worker. That is the time it takes to learn specific production worker skills, but does not account for time spent in formal education.

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Do you need a degree to work in a factory?

No, you do not need a degree to work an entry-level job in a factory. The minimum requirement for most entry-level jobs in a factory is a high school diploma or its equivalent.

While factory work is considered one of the best career options for people with only a high school diploma, there is a growing market for employees with a college degree. This growing share of factory jobs that are now going to college graduates is occurring as manufacturers upgrade their plants with robots and complex software programs.

If a person is applying for a specialized factory job, such as an industrial machinery worker, then more advanced educational achievements such as an associate's or bachelor's degree are often going to be required.

In addition to degree requirements, a newly hired factory worker will be given on-the-job training, which can last from a few months to a year, based on past experience, educational levels, and complexity of the work.

This on-the-job training provides basic knowledge about routine tasks, which could range from setting up a workstation to using grease or fluid properly or wearing appropriate safety gear on site.

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How do you become a production team member?

To become a production team member requires a high school diploma and a drive to work in manufacturing.

A high school diploma or GED is usually the only educational requirement for most production worker jobs.

However, there are some fields that require more technically skilled workers, including automobile or aeronautical engineering facilities. Although this may require an associate's degree in Machining and Product Development or Associate of Applied Science in Manufacturing Technology may be required.

Production workers typically receive on-the-job training when they take a new position. They might train in a group of new hires or receive one-on-one training from a more experienced production worker.

On-the-job training familiarizes new production workers with their duties, company processes, and safety procedures, including safe machine operation, and can last anywhere from two weeks to eight months.

Certifications are another great way to help your chances of landing a production team position. They help production team members prove their competency and even secure higher-paying positions. In most cases, certification is voluntary. However, it is a requirement in some highly technical industries that require their production workers to perform complex tasks.

Some common certifications for production workers include:

  • Certified IPC Specialist issued by the Institute of Printed Circuits (IPC).

  • Certified Automation Profession issued by the International Society of Automation (ISA).

  • Good Manufacturing Practices Facility Certification issued by the Center for Professional Innovation and Education (CfPIE).

  • Certified Production Technician issued by the MSCC.

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What education do you need to be a production operator?

The education a person needs to be a production operator typically depends on the industry, but a person needs at minimum a high school diploma or its equivalent.

However, many specialized production operator positions will require an associate's or bachelor's degree to be hired.

While factory work is considered one of the best career options for people with only a high school diploma, there is a growing market for employees with a college degree. This growing share of factory jobs that are now going to college graduates is occurring as manufacturers upgrade their plants with robots and complex software programs.

If a person is applying for a specialized factory job, such as an industrial machinery worker, then more advanced educational achievements such as an associate's or bachelor's degree are often going to be required.

In addition to degree requirements, a newly hired factory worker will be given on-the-job training, which can last from a few months to a year, based on past experience, educational levels, and complexity of the work.

Learn more about this question

What is a production worker professional?

A production worker professional is an individual who operates machines on a production line. This professional may be involved in all stages of production or be responsible for a specific part of the production process.

A production worker professional helps create, assemble and test products or the parts that make up a product. They typically test these parts and products that are created to ensure they meet specifications, quality, and safety standards.

Production workers usually work as part of an assembly line at a factory or manufacturing facility. Depending on industry and company, typical duties for production workers can vary significantly. However, they often include:

  • Assembling parts or products by hand or using power tools to solder, drill, weld, and attach

  • Observing assembly line and removing faulty parts or products detected

  • Inspecting assembled products to ensure they meet quality and safety specifications

  • Packing up finished products for shipping

  • Unloading, organizing, and stocking shipments

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