Program Coordinator Cover Letter (With Examples)

You can earn the title of program coordinator in a wide variety of industries. Whether you work in healthcare, at a sports venue, or in a community center, a good application isn’t complete until you’ve written a great cover letter.

When you apply, you’ll need a cover letter to accompany your resume and application. While you’ll share the facts of your qualifications in those two documents, your cover letter will give hiring managers a complete picture of who you are and why you’re the best person for this job.

This is especially important if you’re a recent graduate and don’t have much related work experience. You can use your cover letter to show how you can use the experience you do have to succeed in this new job.

In this article, you’ll learn what you should include in your cover letter for a program coordinator position. You’ll also find a sample cover letter that you can use as a reference for your own writing and formatting.

Parts of a Program Coordinator Cover Letter

  1. Your contact information

  2. The date

  3. The recipient’s information

  4. Salutation

  5. Opening paragraph

  6. Body paragraphs

  7. Closing lines

Program Coordinator Cover Letter Opening

Think of the opening paragraph of your cover letter as your opportunity to introduce yourself to the reader. To do this, you’ll want to mention which job you’re applying for, the company name, and what makes you unique as an applicant.

You can also include why you’re applying for the job, especially if this shows that you have a special passion for what the organization does. That is an element of what sets you apart from other candidates and is a valuable quality to have as an employee, so don’t be afraid to include it.

If you don’t have any special affinity for the organization, though, there’s no need to fake it. Simply use the introduction to mention two or three of your qualifications, which you should do either way. You can go into more detail later on in your letter, so keep it brief here.

Here’s an example of what this section could look like:

I’m writing in regard to the resident Program Coordinator position at Hillendale Senior Living. During my four years as a Program Coordinator at the YMCA and my two years volunteering at my local senior living facility, I’ve seen firsthand what group activities can do for people’s mental health and how often seniors struggle in this area. As a result, I was excited to apply for this position.

Program Coordinator Cover Letter Body

This section contains the meat of your cover letter. It’s where you talk about your past work experiences, your skills, and why you want the job. The trick is packing all that content into a document that’s just one page long, which is possible with good planning and strategy.

  1. Match your cover letter to the job description. First of all, it’s never a good idea to write a one-size-fits-all cover letter to send to multiple companies.

    Hiring managers will see through that and be less than impressed, since it shows that you aren’t very invested in their particular company or position. Because of this, you should create a new letter for each job you apply for.

    Second, companies put qualifications on job postings because that’s what they want in an employee. So, if you want a chance at a job offer, you need to show that you have those qualifications.

    Before you begin writing your cover letter, read each requirement in the job description and make sure you list every one that you have on your resume. Then pick two or three of these that either seem to matter most to the company or the ones you’re strongest in and talk about those in your cover letter.

    You can work in additional skills and experiences as well, but these main ones are what you need to focus on in your cover letter.

  2. Tell stories that illustrate the weight of your skills and accomplishments. It’s one thing to say you have good communication skills; it’s another to demonstrate how you’ve used those communication skills to create a positive result for an employer or a project.

    When you’re talking about your main qualifications and skills in your cover letter, share examples of them in action. If you’re trying to show that you have experience creating classes at community centers, talk about how you found a need, created a class to fill that need, and broke enrollment records with the class.

    This is much more powerful than simply saying that you know how to create and run community classes.

  3. Relate your passions to the position and organization. Being a program coordinator takes vision, administrative skills, and passion. You have to care about the project or program you’re running in order to do a good job without burning out.

    Employers know this, so they want to see that you care about your work, this new job, and the organization.

    To show them that you do, you can talk about what aspects of program coordination you’re passionate about, what drew you to this particular position, how the company’s mission, vision, and values align with your own, or a combination of these. Just make sure you’re genuine in what you say.

    If you are lying, hiring managers will confirm that in the interview, so it’s best not to try. If you don’t have a good reason for wanting the job, talk about what you think you’ll enjoy about this position or what you hope to learn from it. Your goal here is to find a truthful way to put some heart into your cover letter.

    Just remember, don’t get overly gushy, as that can be a turnoff as well.

Your cover letter body paragraphs may look something like this:

While I was a Program Coordinator, I was able to gain experience researching community members’ interests and needs and creating classes to meet those. I accomplished this by developing a curriculum, hiring instructors, and marketing the classes. I increased the number of courses we offered by 50%, and not one of them was canceled due to low enrollment.

During this time, I was able to hone my communication and teamwork skills by coordinating and managing a wide variety of employees, volunteers, and instructors who all had different expertise and passions. By listening and clearly communicating my goals and expectations with them, we were able to successfully and efficiently complete all of our projects.

I also have been able to volunteer at my local senior living center, Willowbrook Senior Living Center, several times a week for the past two years. During this time, I saw the impact that group classes have on residents’ physical and mental health. I noticed that Hillendale focuses on these programs more than many facilities do, and I’d be honored to be a part of that.

Program Coordinator Cover Letter Closing Lines

When you’re wrapping up your cover letter, you shouldn’t need more than a few lines to do so. Make sure you express your thanks for the hiring managers giving you their time and consideration and leave them with a call to action of some kind.

This could be a note about how you’re looking forward to continuing to speak with them about the job, your qualifications, or the company, or it could be a request for them to contact you.

Here’s one way you could write a paragraph like this:

I’d love to discuss this position further with you. Please feel free to contact me at your convenience. Thank you for your consideration.

Example of a Program Coordinator Cover Letter

Jeanine Salvato
8888 W 88th Ave.
New York, New York 33333
333-444-5555
jeanines@email.com

February 23, 2021

Marcy Wilson
Hiring Manager
Hillendale Senior Living
New York, New York 33333

Dear Ms. Wilson,

I’m writing in regard to the resident Program Coordinator position at Hillendale Senior Living. During my four years as a Program Coordinator at the YMCA and my two years volunteering at my local senior living facility, I’ve seen firsthand what group activities can do for people’s mental health and how often seniors struggle in this area. As a result, I was excited to apply for this position.

While I was a Program Coordinator, I was able to gain experience researching community members’ interests and needs and creating classes to meet those. I accomplished this by developing curriculum, hiring instructors, and marketing the classes. I increased the number of courses we offered by 50%, and not one of them was canceled due to low enrollment.

During this time, I was able to hone my communication and teamwork skills by coordinating and managing a wide variety of employees, volunteers, and instructors who all had different expertise and passions. By listening and clearly communicating my goals and expectations with them, we were able to successfully and efficiently complete all of our projects.

I also have been able to volunteer at my local senior living center, Willowbrook Senior Living Center, several times a week for the past two years. During this time, I saw the impact that group classes have on residents’ physical and mental health. I noticed that Hillendale focuses on these programs more than many facilities do, and I’d be honored to be a part of that.

I’d love to discuss this position further with you. Please feel free to contact me at your convenience. Thank you for your consideration.

Sincerely,

Jeanine Salvato (Handwritten signature)

Jeanine Salvato