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PERSONALIZED JOBS

Become A Recorder

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Working As A Recorder

  • Interacting With Computers
  • Getting Information
  • Performing for or Working Directly with the Public
  • Performing Administrative Activities
  • Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates
  • Deal with People

  • Mostly Sitting

  • Repetitive

  • $63,565

    Average Salary

What Does A Recorder Do

Information clerks perform routine clerical duties such as maintaining records, collecting data, and providing information to customers.

Duties

Information clerks typically do the following:

  • Prepare routine reports, claims, bills, or orders
  • Collect and record data from customers, staff, and the public
  • Answer questions from customers and the public about products or services
  • File and maintain paper or electronic records

Information clerks perform routine office support functions in an organization, business, or government. They use telephones, computers, and other office equipment such as scanners and fax machines.

Correspondence clerks respond to inquiries from the public or customers. They prepare standard responses to requests for merchandise, damage claims, delinquent accounts, incorrect billings, or complaints about unsatisfactory services. They also may review the organization’s records and type response letters for their supervisors to sign.

Court clerks organize and maintain court records. They prepare the calendar of cases, also known as the docket, and inform attorneys and witnesses about court appearances. Court clerks also receive, file, and forward court documents.

Eligibility interviewers conduct interviews both in person and over the phone to determine if applicants qualify for government assistance and benefits. They answer applicants’ questions about programs and may refer them to other agencies for assistance.

File clerks maintain electronic or paper records. They enter and retrieve data, organize records, and file documents. In organizations with electronic filing systems, file clerks scan and upload documents.

Hotel, motel, and resort desk clerks, also called front desk clerks, provide customer service to guests at the establishment’s front desk. They check guests in and out, assign rooms, and process payments. They also keep occupancy records; take, confirm, or change room reservations; and provide information on the hotel’s policies and services. In addition, front desk clerks answer phone calls, take and deliver messages for guests, and handle guests’ requests and complaints. For example, when guests report problems in their rooms, clerks coordinate with maintenance staff to resolve the issue.

Human resources assistants provide administrative support to human resources managers. They maintain personnel records on employees, including their addresses, employment history, and performance evaluations. They may post information about job openings and compile candidates’ résumés for review.

Interviewers conduct interviews over the phone, in person, through mail, or online. They use the information to complete forms, applications, or questionnaires for market research surveys, census forms, and medical histories. Interviewers typically follow set procedures and questionnaires to obtain specific information.

License clerks process applications for licenses and permits, administer tests, and collect application fees. They determine if applicants are qualified to receive particular licenses or if additional documentation needs to be submitted. They also maintain records of applications received and licenses issued.

Municipal clerks provide administrative support for town or city governments by maintaining government records. They record, maintain, and distribute minutes of town and city council meetings to local officials and staff and help prepare for elections. They also may answer requests for information from local, state, and federal officials and the public.

Order clerks receive orders from customers and process payments. For example, they may enter customer information, such as addresses and payment methods, into the order entry system. They also answer questions about prices and shipping.

Reservation and transportation ticket agents and travel clerks take and confirm passengers’ reservations for hotels and transportation. They also sell and issue tickets and answer questions about itineraries, rates, and package tours. Ticket agents who work at airports and railroads also check bags and issue boarding passes to passengers.

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How To Become A Recorder

Information clerks typically need a high school diploma and learn their skills on the job. Employers may prefer to hire candidates with some college education or an associate’s degree, depending on the occupation.

Education

Candidates typically need a high school diploma for most positions. However, employers may prefer to hire candidates with some college education or an associate’s degree. This is particularly true for eligibility interviewers, human resources assistants, and municipal clerks. Courses in social sciences, as well as word processing and spreadsheet applications, are particularly helpful.

Training

Most information clerks receive short-term on-the-job training, usually lasting a few weeks. Training typically covers clerical procedures and the use of computer applications. Those employed in government receive training that may last several months and include learning about various government programs and regulations.

Advancement

Some information clerks may advance to other administrative positions with more responsibilities, such as office supervisor or office manager. With completion of a bachelor’s degree, some human resources assistants may become human resources specialists.

Important Qualities

Communication skills. Information clerks must be able to explain policies and procedures clearly to customers and the public.

Integrity. Information clerks, particularly human resources assistants, have access to confidential information. They must be trusted to adhere to the applicable confidentiality and privacy rules governing the dissemination of this information.

Interpersonal skills. Information clerks who work with the public and customers must understand and communicate information effectively in order to establish positive relationships.

Organizational skills. Information clerks must be able to retrieve files and other important information quickly and efficiently.

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Recorder Demographics

Gender

Female

56.9%

Male

39.6%

Unknown

3.5%
Ethnicity

White

78.3%

Hispanic or Latino

10.0%

Asian

9.2%

Unknown

1.7%

Black or African American

0.8%
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Languages Spoken

Spanish

50.0%

Chinese

13.9%

French

8.3%

Greek

5.6%

Mandarin

5.6%

Italian

5.6%

Russian

2.8%

Portuguese

2.8%

German

2.8%

Japanese

2.8%
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Recorder Education

Schools

Utah State University

8.3%

Ball State University

8.3%

University of Phoenix

6.9%

Ogeechee Technical College

5.6%

Ashford University

5.6%

Purdue University

5.6%

Georgia Southern University

5.6%

Syracuse University

4.2%

Michigan State University

4.2%

Pennsylvania State University

4.2%

Georgia State University

4.2%

University of Southern California

4.2%

University of Iowa

4.2%

Portland State University

4.2%

George Mason University

4.2%

University of Florida

4.2%

Miami University

4.2%

Indiana University of Pennsylvania

4.2%

Howard University

4.2%

Iowa State University

4.2%
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Majors

Business

17.9%

Accounting

6.8%

English

6.1%

Communication

6.1%

Criminal Justice

5.4%

Management

5.0%

Psychology

4.7%

General Education, Specific Areas

4.7%

Legal Support Services

4.3%

Nursing

3.9%

Journalism

3.9%

Music

3.9%

Finance

3.9%

Computer Science

3.6%

Education

3.6%

Political Science

3.6%

Law

3.6%

Biology

3.2%

Electrical Engineering

2.9%

Health Care Administration

2.9%
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Degrees

Bachelors

39.0%

Other

28.1%

Masters

14.0%

Associate

10.6%

Certificate

4.2%

Doctorate

2.2%

Diploma

1.6%

License

0.4%
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Top Skills for A Recorder

CustomerServiceDataEntryLegalDocumentsPersonnelPhoneCallsComplianceAudioEquipmentPublicRecordPackagesInternetOfficialRecordsEmailComputerSystemComputerSkillsStatutesVDRPowerpointGeneralPublicDigitalTachographWindows

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Top Recorder Skills

  1. Customer Service
  2. Data Entry
  3. Legal Documents
You can check out examples of real life uses of top skills on resumes here:
  • Provided support for customer service department.
  • Performed data entry of recorded documents, identify the difference types of documents from Recorders office and Elections department.
  • Recorded than 12,000 sheriff sales deeds with the Philadelphia County recorder's office; served legal documents i.e.
  • Coordinated with various agencies and departments for resources to track down equipment, emergency supplies, and personnel under emergency conditions.
  • Answered phone calls, looked up medical codes in computer for other radiation facilities pertaining to an existing patient.

Top Recorder Employers

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