FIND PERSONALIZED JOBS
Sign up to Zippia and discover your career options with your personalized career search.
Sorry, we can't find that. Please try a different city or state.
APPLY NOW
Apply Now
×
FIND
PERSONALIZED JOBS

Sorry, we can't find that. Please try a different city or state.

CONTENT HAS
BEEN UNLOCKED
Close this window to view unlocked content
or
find interesting jobs in

Log In

Log In to Save

Sign Up to Save

Sign Up to Dismiss

Sign Up

SIGN UP TO UNLOCK CONTENT

or

The email and password you specified are invalid. Please, try again.

Email and password are mandatory

Forgot Password?

Don't have an account? Sign Up

reset password

Enter your email address and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Back to Log In

Log In

Log In to Save

Sign Up to Save

Sign Up to Dismiss

Sign up to save the job and get personalized job recommendations.

Sign up to dismiss the job and get personalized job recommendations.

or

The email and password you specified are invalid. Please, try again.

Email and password are mandatory

Already have an account? Log in

reset password

Enter your email address and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Back to Log In

Company Saved

Answer a few questions and view jobs at that match your preferences.

Where do you want to work?

Job Saved

See your Saved Jobs now

or

find more interesting jobs in

Job Dismissed

Find better matching jobs in

Your search has been saved!

Become A Research Geologist

Where do you want to work?

To get started, tell us where you'd like to work.
Sorry, we can't find that. Please try a different city or state.

Working As A Research Geologist

  • Analyzing Data or Information
  • Getting Information
  • Interacting With Computers
  • Documenting/Recording Information
  • Processing Information
  • $82,000

    Average Salary

What Does A Research Geologist Do

Geoscientists study the physical aspects of the Earth, such as its composition, structure, and processes, to learn about its past, present, and future.

Duties

Geoscientists typically do the following:

  • Plan and carry out field studies, in which they visit locations to collect samples and conduct surveys
  • Analyze aerial photographs, well logs (detailed records of geologic formations found during drilling), rock samples, and other data sources to locate deposits of natural resources and estimate their size
  • Conduct laboratory tests on samples collected in the field
  • Make geologic maps and charts
  • Prepare written scientific reports
  • Present their findings to clients, colleagues, and other interested parties
  • Review reports and research done by other scientists

Geoscientists use a wide variety of tools, both simple and complex. During a typical day in the field, they may use a hammer and chisel to collect rock samples and then use ground-penetrating radar equipment to search for oil or minerals. In laboratories, they may use x rays and electron microscopes to determine the chemical and physical composition of rock samples. They may also use remote sensing equipment to collect data, as well as geographic information systems (GIS) and modeling software to analyze the data collected.

Geoscientists often supervise the work of technicians and coordinate work with other scientists, both in the field and in the lab.

Many geoscientists are involved in the search for and development of natural resources, such as petroleum. Others work in environmental protection and preservation, and are involved in projects to clean up and reclaim land. Some specialize in a particular aspect of the Earth, such as its oceans.

The following are examples of types of geoscientists:

Engineering geologists apply geologic principles to civil and environmental engineering. They offer advice on major construction projects and help with other projects, such as environmental cleanup and reducing natural hazards.

Geologists study the materials, processes, and history of the Earth. They investigate how rocks were formed and what has happened to them since their formation. There are subgroups of geologists as well, such as stratigraphers, who study stratified rock, and mineralogists, who study the structure and composition of minerals.

Geochemists use physical and organic chemistry to study the composition of elements found in ground water, such as water from wells or aquifers, and of earth materials, such as rocks and sediment.

Geophysicists use the principles of physics to learn about the Earth’s surface and interior. They also study the properties of Earth’s magnetic, electric, and gravitational fields.

Oceanographers study the motion and circulation of ocean waters; the physical and chemical properties of the oceans; and how these properties affect coastal areas, climate, and weather.

Paleontologists study fossils found in geological formations in order to trace the evolution of plant and animal life and the geologic history of the Earth.

Petroleum geologists explore the Earth for oil and gas deposits. They analyze geological information to identify sites that should be explored. They collect rock and sediment samples from sites through drilling and other methods and test the samples for the presence of oil and gas. They also estimate the size of oil and gas deposits and work to develop sites to extract oil and gas.

Seismologists study earthquakes and related phenomena, such as tsunamis. They use seismographs and other instruments to collect data on these events.

For a more extensive list of geoscientist specialties, visit the American Geosciences Institute.

People with a geoscience background may become postsecondary teachers.

Show More

Show Less

How To Become A Research Geologist

Geoscientists typically need at least a bachelor’s degree for most entry-level positions. In several states, geoscientists may need a license to offer their services to the public.

Education

Geoscientists need at least a bachelor’s degree for most entry-level positions. However, some workers begin their careers as geoscientists with a master’s degree. A Ph.D. is necessary for most basic research and college teaching positions.

A degree in geoscience is preferred by employers, although a degree in physics, chemistry, biology, mathematics, engineering, or computer science usually is accepted if it includes coursework in geology.

Most geoscience programs include geology courses in mineralogy, petrology, and structural geology, which are important for all geoscientists. In addition to classes in geology, most programs require students to take courses in other physical sciences, mathematics, engineering, and computer science. Some programs include training on specific software packages that will be useful to those seeking a career as a geoscientist.

Computer knowledge is essential for geoscientists. Students who have experience with computer modeling, data analysis, and digital mapping will be the most prepared to enter the job market.

Many employers seek applicants who have gained field and laboratory experience while pursuing a degree. Summer field camp programs offer students the opportunity to work closely with professors and apply their classroom knowledge in the field. Students can gain valuable experience in data collection and geologic mapping.

Important Qualities

Communication skills. Geoscientists write reports and research papers. They must be able to present their findings clearly to clients or professionals who do not have a background in geoscience.

Critical-thinking skills. Geoscientists base their findings on sound observation and careful evaluation of data.

Interpersonal skills. Most geoscientists work as part of a team with engineers, technicians, and other scientists.

Outdoor skills. Geoscientists may spend significant amounts of time outdoors. Familiarity with camping skills, general comfort being outside for long periods, and specific skills such as boat handling or even being able to pilot an aircraft could prove useful for geoscientists.

Physical stamina. Geoscientists may need to hike to remote locations while carrying testing and sampling equipment when they conduct fieldwork.

Problem-solving skills. Geoscientists work on complex projects filled with challenges. Evaluating statistical data and other forms of information in order to make judgments and inform the actions of other workers requires a special ability to perceive and address problems.

Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations

Some states require geoscientists to obtain a license to practice. Requirements vary by state but typically include minimum education and experience requirements and a passing score on an exam.

Show More

Show Less

Do you work as a Research Geologist?

Send To A Friend

Research Geologist Jobs

NO RESULTS

Aw snap, no jobs found.

Add To My Jobs

Do you work as a Research Geologist?

Help others decide if this is a good career for them

Do you work as a Research Geologist?

Average Yearly Salary
$82,000
View Detailed Salary Report
$41,000
Min 10%
$82,000
Median 50%
$82,000
Median 50%
$82,000
Median 50%
$82,000
Median 50%
$82,000
Median 50%
$82,000
Median 50%
$82,000
Median 50%
$162,000
Max 90%
Best Paying Company
Exxon Mobil
Highest Paying City
Golden, CO
Highest Paying State
North Dakota
Avg Experience Level
3.0 years
How much does a Research Geologist make at top companies?
The national average salary for a Research Geologist in the United States is $82,213 per year or $40 per hour. Those in the bottom 10 percent make under $41,000 a year, and the top 10 percent make over $162,000.

Real Research Geologist Salaries

Job Title Company Location Start Date Salary
Senior Research Geologist Exxon Mobil Corporation Houston, TX Sep 07, 2009 $161,138 -
$202,700
Senior Research Geologist Exxon Mobil Corporation Houston, TX Sep 08, 2011 $138,362 -
$196,400
Research Geologist Chevron Corporation Houston, TX Jun 09, 2016 $138,000
Senior Research Geologist The Pebble Limited Partnership Golden, CO Feb 03, 2011 $136,970
Senior Research Geologist The Pebble Limited Partnership Iliamna, AK Feb 10, 2011 $136,970
Senior Research Geologist Exxon Mobil Corporation Houston, TX Sep 08, 2011 $135,470 -
$196,400
Research Geologist Shell International Exploration & Production Inc. Houston, TX Aug 17, 2012 $133,800
Senior Research Geologist Exxon Mobil Corporation Houston, TX Feb 01, 2010 $132,662 -
$176,200
Senior Research Geologist The Pebble Limited Partnership Golden, CO Mar 23, 2010 $123,133
Mudrock Research Geologist Shell International Exploration & Production Inc. Houston, TX Jul 02, 2012 $120,000
Senior Research Geologist The Pebble Limited Partnership Iliamna, AK Mar 23, 2012 $114,785 -
$135,655
Research Geologist Chevron Corporation Houston, TX Jun 21, 2011 $113,700
Research Geologist Chevron Corporation San Ramon, CA Aug 26, 2013 $113,000
Research Geologist Chevron Corporation San Ramon, CA Sep 05, 2013 $113,000
Senior Research Geologist Exxon Mobil Corporation Houston, TX Sep 09, 2009 $111,400 -
$189,400
Research Geologist Shell International Exploration & Production Inc. Houston, TX Sep 09, 2010 $110,500
Research Geologist Exxon Mobil Corporation Houston, TX Feb 01, 2012 $107,182 -
$148,300
Research Geologist Exxonmobil Upstream Research Company Houston, TX Jul 01, 2012 $107,182 -
$152,000
Research Geologist Chevron Corporation San Ramon, CA Aug 24, 2012 $105,000
Research Geologist Exxon Mobil Corporation Houston, TX Sep 01, 2010 $104,187 -
$145,400
Research Geologist Exxon Mobil Corporation Houston, TX Oct 01, 2010 $104,187 -
$145,400
Research Geologist Exxon Mobil Corporation Houston, TX Aug 22, 2010 $90,100 -
$153,100
Research Geologist Exxon Mobil Corporation Houston, TX Oct 01, 2010 $85,600 -
$145,400
Research Geologist GS Us Geological Survey Flagstaff, AZ Nov 18, 2015 $79,554

No Results

To get more results, try adjusting your search by changing your filters.

See More Salaries

How Would You Rate The Salary Of a Research Geologist?

Have you worked as a Research Geologist? Help other job seekers by rating your experience as a Research Geologist.

Rank:

Average Salary:

Embed On Your Website

Top 10 Best States for Research Geologists

  1. District of Columbia
  2. Louisiana
  3. Texas
  4. Colorado
  5. California
  6. New Jersey
  7. Oklahoma
  8. Alaska
  9. Virginia
  10. Washington
  • (31 jobs)
  • (37 jobs)
  • (149 jobs)
  • (98 jobs)
  • (644 jobs)
  • (113 jobs)
  • (11 jobs)
  • (3 jobs)
  • (176 jobs)
  • (88 jobs)

Research Geologist Demographics

Gender

Male

70.1%

Female

25.4%

Unknown

4.5%
Ethnicity

White

57.8%

Hispanic or Latino

13.3%

Black or African American

11.5%

Asian

10.8%

Unknown

6.6%
Show More
Foreign Languages Spoken

Spanish

66.7%

French

33.3%

Research Geologist Education

Schools

University of Texas at Austin

11.8%

Louisiana State University and A&M College

8.8%

University of Oklahoma

8.8%

University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee

8.8%

University of Houston

5.9%

Rice University

5.9%

Colorado School of Mines

5.9%

University of Texas at El Paso

5.9%

Ohio University -

5.9%

Harvard University

2.9%

University of Nevada - Reno

2.9%

Seattle University

2.9%

Northwest Missouri State University

2.9%

University of Massachusetts Amherst

2.9%

University of Texas at Dallas

2.9%

University of Colorado at Boulder

2.9%

University of California - Davis

2.9%

University of Missouri - Kansas City

2.9%

University of North Carolina at Wilmington

2.9%

University of California - Riverside

2.9%
Show More
Majors

Geology

73.7%

Environmental Science

5.3%

Geological Engineering

3.9%

Civil Engineering

2.6%

Biology

1.3%

Philosophy

1.3%

Business

1.3%

Urban Planning

1.3%

Marine Sciences

1.3%

Journalism

1.3%

Mining Engineering

1.3%

Medical Assisting Services

1.3%

Computer Science

1.3%

Elementary Education

1.3%

Geography

1.3%
Show More
Degrees

Masters

44.7%

Doctorate

34.2%

Bachelors

14.5%

Other

3.9%

Certificate

1.3%

Associate

1.3%
Show More

Job type you want
Full Time
Part Time
Internship
Temporary

How Would You Rate Working As a Research Geologist?

Are you working as a Research Geologist? Help us rate Research Geologist as a Career.

Top Research Geologist Employers

Jobs From Top Research Geologist Employers

Related to your recently viewed content