Research Physicist

Research Physicist Salary

Average Yearly Salary
$79,000
$41,000
Min 10%
$79,000
Median 50%
$151,000
Max 90%
Best Paying Company
KBR
Highest Paying City
Washington, DC
Highest Paying State
District of Columbia
Average Experience Level
4.7 years
How much does a research physicist make?
Research Physicists in America make an average salary of $79,702 per year or $38.32 per hour. Those in the bottom 10 percent make under $41,000 a year, and the top 10 percent make over $151,000. Employers that have the highest concentration of job opportunities for Research Physicists are Professional companies and Technology companies. The best states for high paying Research Physicist jobs are District of Columbia, North Dakota, Alaska, Minnesota, and South Dakota. The typical tenure for a Research Physicist is 4.7 years.
Annual Salaries For Related Jobs
Physicist
$80,815

Average Research Physicist Salary By Location

As a Research Physicist in the U.S., you can expect to earn on average $79,702 per year or $38.32 per hour. The city with the highest Research Physicist salary is Washington, DC at $89,473 per year. The average entry-level salary in Washington, DC is $50,000. Some of the states with the best Research Physicist salaries are District of Columbia, North Dakota, Alaska, Minnesota, South Dakota, Maryland, and Nebraska. Tennessee, North Carolina, and Alabama have the lowest Research Physicist salaries.
RankCityAverage Salary
1
Washington, DC
$89,473
2
Minneapolis, MN
$77,392
3
Gaithersburg, MD
$75,801
4
Madison, WI
$70,541
5
Menlo Park, CA
$70,329

Average Research Physicist Salary By Company

Like every industry, there is a range of salaries a Research Physicist makes. Professional companies and Technology companies are the best when it comes to the number of employment opportunities. Research Physicists at KBR and Massachusetts General Physicians ... report the highest salaries. In addition, companies like Sandia National Laboratories and Passaic Beth Israel Hospital report highly competitive salaries for Research Physicists.