FIND PERSONALIZED JOBS
Sign up to Zippia and discover your career options with your personalized career search.
Sorry, we can't find that. Please try a different city or state.
APPLY NOW
Apply Now
×
FIND
PERSONALIZED JOBS

Sorry, we can't find that. Please try a different city or state.

CONTENT HAS
BEEN UNLOCKED
Close this window to view unlocked content
or
find interesting jobs in

Log In

Log In to Save

Sign Up to Save

Sign Up to Dismiss

Sign Up

SIGN UP TO UNLOCK CONTENT

or

The email and password you specified are invalid. Please, try again.

Email and password are mandatory

Forgot Password?

Don't have an account? Sign Up

reset password

Enter your email address and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Back to Log In

Log In

Log In to Save

Sign Up to Save

Sign Up to Dismiss

Sign up to save the job and get personalized job recommendations.

Sign up to dismiss the job and get personalized job recommendations.

or

The email and password you specified are invalid. Please, try again.

Email and password are mandatory

Already have an account? Log in

reset password

Enter your email address and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Back to Log In

Company Saved

Answer a few questions and view jobs at that match your preferences.

Where do you want to work?

Job Saved

See your Saved Jobs now

or

find more interesting jobs in

Job Dismissed

Find better matching jobs in

Your search has been saved!

Become A Revenue Specialist

Where do you want to work?

To get started, tell us where you'd like to work.
Sorry, we can't find that. Please try a different city or state.

Working As A Revenue Specialist

  • Getting Information
  • Performing for or Working Directly with the Public
  • Communicating with Persons Outside Organization
  • Processing Information
  • Evaluating Information to Determine Compliance with Standards
  • Unpleasant/Angry People

  • Mostly Sitting

  • Repetitive

  • $75,000

    Average Salary

What Does A Revenue Specialist Do

Tax examiners and collectors, and revenue agents ensure that federal, state, and local governments get their tax money from businesses and citizens. They review tax returns, conduct audits, identify taxes owed, and collect overdue tax payments.

Duties

Tax examiners and collectors, and revenue agents typically do the following:

  • Review filed tax returns to determine whether credits and deductions claimed are allowed by law
  • Contact taxpayers to address problems and to request supporting documentation
  • Conduct field audits and investigations of income tax returns to verify information or to update tax liabilities
  • Evaluate financial information, using their familiarity with accounting procedures and knowledge of changes to tax laws and regulations
  • Keep records on each case they deal with, including contacts, telephone numbers, and actions taken
  • Notify taxpayers of any overpayment or underpayment and either issue a refund or request additional payment

Tax examiners and collectors, and revenue agents are responsible for ensuring that individuals and businesses pay the taxes they owe. In addition to verifying that tax returns are filed properly, they follow up with taxpayers whose returns are questionable or who owe more money.

Different levels of government collect different types of taxes. The federal government deals primarily with personal and business income taxes. State governments collect income and sales taxes. Local governments collect sales and property taxes.

Because many states assess individual income taxes based on the taxpayer’s reported federal income, tax examiners working for the federal government report to the states any adjustments or corrections they make. State tax examiners then determine whether the adjustments affect how much the taxpayer owes the state.

Tax examiners and collectors, and revenue agents have different duties and responsibilities:

Tax examiners usually deal with the simplest tax returns—those filed by individual taxpayers who claim few deductions and those filed by small businesses. At the entry level, many tax examiners do clerical tasks, such as reviewing tax returns and entering them into a computer system for processing. Tax examiners also may contact individual taxpayers in order to resolve any outstanding problems with their returns.

Much of a tax examiner’s job involves making sure that tax credits and deductions claimed by taxpayers are lawful. If a taxpayer owes additional taxes, tax examiners adjust the total amount by assessing fees, interest, and penalties and then notify the taxpayer of the total amount owed.

Revenue agents specialize in tax-related accounting for the U.S. Internal Revenue Service (IRS) and for equivalent agencies in state and local governments. Like tax examiners, they review returns for accuracy. However, revenue agents handle complicated tax returns of large businesses and corporations.

Many experienced revenue agents specialize in a particular area. For example, they may focus exclusively on multinational businesses. Regardless of their specialty, revenue agents must keep up to date with changes in the lengthy and complex tax laws and regulations.

Collectors, also called revenue officers in the IRS, deal with overdue accounts. The process of collecting an overdue payment starts with the revenue agent or tax examiner sending a report to the taxpayer. If the taxpayer makes no effort to pay, the case is assigned to a collector.

When a collector takes a case, he or she first sends a notice to the taxpayer. The collector then works with the taxpayer to settle the debt. Settlement may involve setting up a plan in which the amount owed is paid back in small amounts over time.

When delinquent taxpayers claim that they cannot pay their taxes, collectors investigate and verify these claims. Collectors research information on taxpayer mortgages or financial statements and locate taxpayer-owned items of value through third parties, such as neighbors or local departments of motor vehicles. Ultimately, collectors must decide whether the IRS should take a lien—a claim on an asset such as a bank account, real estate, or an automobile—to settle a debt. Collectors also have the authority to garnish wages—that is, take a portion of earned wages—to collect taxes owed.

Show More

Show Less

How To Become A Revenue Specialist

Most tax examiners and collectors, and revenue agents need a bachelor’s degree in accounting or a related field. However, the required level of education and experience varies by position and employer.

Education

Tax examiners need a bachelor’s degree in accounting or a related field, or a combination of relevant education and specialized experience in accounting, auditing, or tax compliance work. Candidates for tax examiner positions at the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) must have a bachelor’s degree or 1 year of full-time specialized experience.

Revenue agents need a bachelor’s degree in accounting, business administration, economics, or a related discipline. A combination of relevant education and full-time experience in business administration, accounting, or auditing is also qualifying. Revenue agents with the IRS must have either a bachelor’s degree or 30 semester hours of accounting coursework, along with specialized experience. Specialized experience includes work in accounting, bookkeeping, or tax analysis.

Collectors usually must have some combination of relevant college education and specialized experience. Specialized experience may include previous work as a loan officer or credit manager, or a background in collections, management, customer service, or tax compliance. A bachelor’s degree is needed for employment as a collector with the IRS; no additional experience is required, and experience may not be substituted for the degree. Employers desire degrees in business, finance, accounting, and criminal justice.

At the state and local levels, a bachelor’s degree is not always required, although related work experience is desired.

Training

Newly hired tax examiners get some formal training, which typically lasts between 1 month and 1 year. All tax examiners must keep current with changes in the tax code and enforcement procedures.

Entry-level collectors get both formal training and on-the-job training under an instructor’s guidance before working independently. Collectors also are encouraged to continue their professional education by attending meetings to exchange information about how modifications to tax laws affect collection methods.

Other Experience

Some state and local governments accept work experience as a substitute for education. In these cases, employers may hire tax examiners and revenue agents who have work experience in accounting, bookkeeping, or tax analysis. Employers may also hire collectors who have work experience in related areas, such as collections, customer service, or credit checking.

Advancement

Tax examiners, revenue agents, and collectors have different opportunities for career advancement. Tax examiners who review individual tax returns may advance to revenue agent positions, working on more complex business returns. Those with experience in supervisory or managerial roles may move to jobs that involve supervision of other examiners and revenue agents. Collectors who demonstrate leadership skills and a thorough knowledge of tax collection activities may advance to supervisory or managerial collector positions.

Important Qualities

Analytical skills. Tax examiners and revenue agents must be able to identify questionable claims for credits and deductions. Ultimately, they must be able to determine, on further review of financial documentation, if the credits or deductions are lawful.

Computer skills. Tax examiners and revenue agents must be comfortable using a variety of computer programs. These programs include tax preparation and bookkeeping software used by individuals and businesses.

Detail oriented. Tax examiners and revenue agents verify the accuracy of each entry on the tax returns they review. Therefore, it is important that they pay attention to detail.

Interpersonal skills. Collectors must be comfortable dealing with people, including speaking with them during confrontational situations. When pursuing overdue accounts, collectors should be firm and composed.

Organizational skills. Tax examiners and revenue agents often work with multiple returns and a variety of financial documents. Keeping the various pieces of information organized is essential.

Show More

Show Less

Do you work as a Revenue Specialist?

Send To A Friend

Revenue Specialist Jobs

NO RESULTS

Aw snap, no jobs found.

Add To My Jobs

Revenue Specialist Career Paths

Revenue Specialist
Billing Specialist Accounts Receivable Specialist Accountant
Assistant Controller
6 Yearsyrs
Billing Specialist Specialist Consultant
Accounting Manager
7 Yearsyrs
Billing Specialist Team Leader Office Manager
Practice Manager
9 Yearsyrs
Accounts Receivable Specialist Staff Accountant Senior Finance Analyst
Manager Finance Planning And Analysis
8 Yearsyrs
Accounts Receivable Specialist Accountant Office Manager
Business Office Manager
7 Yearsyrs
Coordinator Team Leader Director
Managing Director
11 Yearsyrs
Coordinator Team Leader Manager
Assistant Vice President
7 Yearsyrs
Coordinator Consultant Office Manager
Accountant And Office Manager
6 Yearsyrs
Specialist Account Executive Branch Manager
Vice President And Manager
10 Yearsyrs
Specialist Executive Assistant Property Manager
Asset Manager
7 Yearsyrs
Reimbursement Specialist Medical Coder Billing Manager
Accounts Receivable Manager
6 Yearsyrs
Reimbursement Specialist Supervisor Controller
Assistant Director Of Finance
7 Yearsyrs
Reimbursement Specialist Supervisor Unit Manager
Collections Manager
5 Yearsyrs
Accountant Accounts Payable Supervisor
Accounts Payable Manager
7 Yearsyrs
Medical Coder Consultant Senior Accountant
Audit Manager
6 Yearsyrs
Medical Coder Manager Finance Manager
Reporting Manager
8 Yearsyrs
Finance Analyst Senior Accountant Accounting Manager
Comptroller
6 Yearsyrs
Finance Analyst Senior Auditor Compliance Manager
Compliance Director
12 Yearsyrs
Finance Analyst Revenue Analyst
Revenue Manager
8 Yearsyrs
Analyst Underwriter Senior Credit Analyst
Credit Manager
5 Yearsyrs
Show More
Share

Do you work as a Revenue Specialist?

Help others decide if this is a good career for them

Average Length of Employment
Revenue Agent 4.5 years
Billing Specialist 3.0 years
Revenue Specialist 3.0 years
Account Specialist 2.7 years
Specialist 2.6 years
Top Careers Before Revenue Specialist
Cashier 6.6%
Secretary 3.8%
Internship 3.5%
Specialist 2.7%
Manager 2.6%
Top Careers After Revenue Specialist
Accountant 4.7%
Analyst 4.3%
Specialist 3.7%
Cashier 3.7%
Supervisor 3.6%
Manager 3.3%

Do you work as a Revenue Specialist?

Revenue Specialist Demographics

Gender

Female

67.7%

Male

21.4%

Unknown

10.9%
Ethnicity

White

61.0%

Hispanic or Latino

15.1%

Black or African American

13.0%

Asian

7.6%

Unknown

3.3%
Show More
Foreign Languages Spoken

Spanish

63.2%

French

7.4%

Russian

4.4%

Vietnamese

2.9%

German

2.9%

Arabic

2.9%

Swedish

1.5%

Portuguese

1.5%

Hindi

1.5%

Hebrew

1.5%

Lakota

1.5%

Ukrainian

1.5%

Somali

1.5%

Urdu

1.5%

Gujarati

1.5%

Korean

1.5%

Italian

1.5%
Show More

Revenue Specialist Education

Schools

Florida State University

21.9%

University of Phoenix

17.5%

Tallahassee Community College

9.7%

University of South Florida

4.2%

Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University

4.2%

Kaplan University

4.0%

University of Florida

3.7%

Nova Southeastern University

3.5%

Saint Leo University

3.5%

Ohio State University

3.2%

Keiser University

3.2%

Ashford University

3.0%

University of Central Florida

2.7%

Strayer University

2.5%

Indiana Wesleyan University

2.5%

Portland State University

2.2%

Liberty University

2.2%

Columbus State Community College

2.0%

Valencia College

2.0%

Miami Dade College

2.0%
Show More
Majors

Business

29.6%

Health Care Administration

12.0%

Accounting

12.0%

Criminal Justice

5.3%

Psychology

4.1%

Management

3.7%

Finance

3.6%

Medical Assisting Services

3.4%

Computer Information Systems

3.4%

Marketing

2.6%

General Studies

2.5%

Nursing

2.4%

Communication

2.4%

Education

2.2%

Human Resources Management

1.9%

Liberal Arts

1.9%

Public Administration

1.8%

Political Science

1.8%

Public Health

1.6%

Computer Science

1.6%
Show More
Degrees

Bachelors

37.4%

Other

22.1%

Masters

15.0%

Associate

14.9%

Certificate

6.0%

Diploma

3.4%

Doctorate

0.7%

License

0.4%
Show More

Job type you want
Full Time
Part Time
Internship
Temporary
Average Yearly Salary
$75,000
View Detailed Salary Report
$38,000
Min 10%
$75,000
Median 50%
$75,000
Median 50%
$75,000
Median 50%
$75,000
Median 50%
$75,000
Median 50%
$75,000
Median 50%
$75,000
Median 50%
$147,000
Max 90%
Best Paying Company
DaVita
Highest Paying City
Baltimore, MD
Highest Paying State
District of Columbia
Avg Experience Level
2.9 years
How much does a Revenue Specialist make at top companies?
The national average salary for a Revenue Specialist in the United States is $75,370 per year or $36 per hour. Those in the bottom 10 percent make under $38,000 a year, and the top 10 percent make over $147,000.

Real Revenue Specialist Salaries

Job Title Company Location Start Date Salary
Area Revenue Management Specialist Sajahtera, Inc. DBA Beverly Hills Hotel Beverly Hills, CA Mar 18, 2015 $122,000 -
$132,000
Pricing and Revenue Management Specialist Spirit Airlines Miramar, FL Nov 08, 2016 $119,122 -
$120,000
Revenue Assurance Specialist T-Mobile USA, Inc. Bellevue, WA Mar 10, 2015 $101,733
Specialist, Transatlantic Revenue Management Delta Air Lines, Inc. Atlanta, GA Sep 27, 2013 $96,636
Revenue Assurance Specialist T-Mobile USA, Inc. Bellevue, WA Oct 04, 2015 $96,221 -
$96,314
Specialist-International Revenue Management Delta Air Lines, Inc. Atlanta, GA Aug 10, 2012 $94,500
Revenue Assurance Specialist Amdocs Inc. Framingham, MA Jul 01, 2015 $92,569
Specialist-Revenue Management Delta Air Lines, Inc. Atlanta, GA Sep 04, 2014 $90,852
Specialist, Onboard Revenue Product Development & Princess Cruise Lines, Ltd. Santa Clarita, CA Jan 20, 2014 $75,000
Revenue Cycle Specialist Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Inc. Boston, MA Mar 25, 2015 $57,217
District Revenue Specialist Carlson Hotels, Inc. MN Sep 01, 2015 $55,000
Revenue Cycle Specialist Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Inc. Boston, MA Mar 25, 2012 $55,000

No Results

To get more results, try adjusting your search by changing your filters.

See More Salaries

How Would You Rate The Salary Of a Revenue Specialist?

Have you worked as a Revenue Specialist? Help other job seekers by rating your experience as a Revenue Specialist.

Top Skills for A Revenue Specialist

  1. Customer Service
  2. Insurance Companies
  3. Financial Statements
You can check out examples of real life uses of top skills on resumes here:
  • Received incoming calls, providing polite and professional customer service while processing orders and resolving customer questions and concerns.
  • Billed secondary insurance companies; patients remaining balances
  • Prepare Financial Statements on a monthly and a quarterly basis.
  • Provide information to clients regarding child support cases, initiate enforcement tools, and examine payment obligations for cases.
  • Contacted and corresponded with taxpayers and/or their personal representative to obtain information and resolved discrepancies on tax returns.

How Would You Rate Working As a Revenue Specialist?

Are you working as a Revenue Specialist? Help us rate Revenue Specialist as a Career.

Rank:

Average Salary:

Embed On Your Website

Top 10 Best States for Revenue Specialists

  1. District of Columbia
  2. Massachusetts
  3. Alaska
  4. Rhode Island
  5. Minnesota
  6. Delaware
  7. New Jersey
  8. Colorado
  9. Virginia
  10. Connecticut
  • (531 jobs)
  • (1,255 jobs)
  • (106 jobs)
  • (155 jobs)
  • (910 jobs)
  • (113 jobs)
  • (942 jobs)
  • (782 jobs)
  • (1,814 jobs)
  • (378 jobs)

Top Revenue Specialist Employers

Show More

Jobs From Top Revenue Specialist Employers

Revenue Specialist Videos

Dan's Day - A Day in the Life of a Consultant

Medical Coding and Billing Career: Is It Right For You?

Career Advice on becoming a Management Accountant by Matthew R (Full Version)

Related to your recently viewed content