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Rubbermaid Commercial Products Company History Timeline

1968

From bath mats to BRUTE containers to the first resin molded mop bucket, a lot has happened since 1968, but our commitment to manufacturing excellence has never wavered.

RCP became a separate entity from Rubbermaid, Inc. in 1968.

Noble also placed a heavy emphasis on new product development, evidenced by the objective he set in 1968 that aimed to have 30 percent of total annual sales come from products introduced over the preceding five years.

1969

In 1969 Rubbermaid added the sales party to its traditional marketing efforts, a sales technique first popularized by Tupper-ware.

1971

In 1971 Rubbermaid began to market its products through direct supermarket retail distribution.

1973

Although initially profitable, this practice resulted in the company running afoul of the Federal Trade Commission FTC in 1973.

1974

Although the rubber dustpan, designed and manufactured by Caldwell and his wife, cost 1.00 much more than the 39 metal pans then available in stores Caldwell rang ten doorbells and sold nine dustpans, as he recalled in an interview published in The New York Times on May 19, 1974.

By 1974 industrial and commercial products provided 25 percent of the company s sales.

1975

Rubbermaid discontinued its minimum price agreements with wholesalers and retailers in 1975, citing pending legislation and negative public opinion.

1976

Nevertheless, the party plan was not profitable until 1976.

In 1976 the FTC ruled unanimously that Rubbermaid had violated antitrust laws and issued a cease-and-desist order to prevent the company from renewing these practices.

1977

Campanella, Frank W., Wide and Growing Line Spurs Rubbermaid Gains, Barren s, October 3, 1977.

1980

In the 1980 s, RCP pioneered the development of high performance industrial, cleaning and agricultural products, and solidified a market leadership position that would remain in place for years to come.

Noble retired in 1980, and Stanley C. Gault took over as chairman.

1981

In 1981 Rubbermaid had made its first outright acquisition, buying privately held Carian, owner of the Con-Tact plastic coverings brand name.

1983

The company was named to the Fortune 500 list in 1983, and the following years became one of Fortune 500s most admired companies.

1984

Rubbermaid acquired Little Tikes Company, a manufacturer of children's backyard toys, in 1984.

1985

In addition, the company expanded its capacity in plastic and rubber products in 1985 with its purchase of the Gott Corporation, which makes insulated coolers and beverage holders.

1987

Although the strike eventually was settled amicably, traditionally, the company has sought to minimize union activity by building plants outside union strongholds, in places such as Arizona, where it began construction of a plant near Phoenix in 1987 to serve its western markets.

In 1987 a seasonal products division was formed to produce and sell lawn and garden products, sporting goods, and automotive accessories.

1989

Rubbermaid formed a joint venture with a French company, Allibert, to manufacture plastic outdoor furniture in North Carolina in 1989.

1990

Rubbermaid formed a second joint venture with the Curver Group, owned by Dutch chemical maker DSM in 1990 to make and sell housewares and resin furniture in European, Middle Eastern, and north African markets through Curver-Rubbermaid.

The following year the company created an office products division, which included MicroComputer Accessories and eventually Eldon Industries, acquired in 1990.

1994

Also brought into the Rubbermaid fold in 1994 were Empire Brushes, a leading United States maker of brooms, mops, and brushes and Carex Inc., which made products for the burgeoning home health care market.

1995

Net earnings grew as well, until a major restructuring in 1995-97 cut company profits.

1996

By 1996 foreign sales were up to 16 percent of overall sales, a rate of increase which if continued would mean the company would fall well short of its 30 percent goal.

The company also added a new infant product division to its organizational chart with its 1996 acquisition of Graco Children s Products Inc., maker of strollers, play yards, and infant swings, for 320 million.

Wooster, OH Wooster Book Co., 1996.

1999

In 1999, the Newell Company, with headquarters in Freeport, Illinois, purchased Rubbermaid Incorporated.

2000

Schmitt aimed to increase nondomestic sales to 25 percent by 2000 later, this goal was boosted to 30 percent , and began to seek out acquisition and joint venture opportunities to help reach this goal.

2003

Some of Rubbermaid's manufacturing line was moved to Mexico, and in November 2003 Newell Rubbermaid Incorporated announced that it was pulling its operations out of Wooster, ending Rubbermaid's long relationship with that community.

2021

2021 Rubbermaid Commercial Products.

Founded
1968
Company Founded
Headquarters
Winchester, VA
Company Headquarter

Rubbermaid Commercial Products Jobs

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