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Become A School Bus Monitor

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Working As A School Bus Monitor

  • Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Material
  • Operating Vehicles, Mechanized Devices, or Equipment
  • Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events
  • Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates
  • Getting Information
  • Mostly Sitting

  • $36,810

    Average Salary

What Does A School Bus Monitor Do At First Student

Knows the route and remains alert to monitor the welfare of passengers while in routeCommunicates behavior problems and conditions of various stops with the driverAssists in pre-trip and post-trip inspections of the busAssists students in the loading and unloading processCooperates and communicates with school personnel, students, and parentsAttends all safety and training meetingsConducts emergency evacuation from the bus, including use of exiting by emergency doorOpens and closes service doors and moves up and down steps multiple times dailyCleans the inside of the busAssists driver when necessary to safely direct the vehicle backwardsMonitor/Aide Required

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How To Become A School Bus Monitor

Bus drivers must have a commercial driver’s license (CDL). This can sometimes be earned during on-the-job training. A bus driver must possess a clean driving record and often may be required to pass a background check. They also must meet physical, hearing and vision requirements. In addition, bus drivers often need a high school diploma or the equivalent.

Education

Most employers prefer drivers to have a high school diploma or equivalent.

Training

Bus drivers typically go through 1 to 3 months of training. Part of the training is spent on a driving course, where drivers practice various maneuvers with a bus. They then begin to drive in light traffic and eventually make practice runs on the type of route that they expect to drive. New drivers make regularly scheduled trips with passengers and are accompanied by an experienced driver who gives helpful tips, answers questions, and evaluates the new driver's performance.

Some drivers’ training is also spent in the classroom. They learn their company’s rules and regulations, state and municipal traffic laws, and safe driving practices. Drivers also learn about schedules and bus routes, fares, and how to interact with passengers.

Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations

All bus drivers must have a commercial driver’s license (CDL). Some new bus drivers can earn their CDL during on-the-job training. The qualifications for getting one vary by state but generally include passing both knowledge and driving tests. States have the right to not issue a license to someone who has had a CDL suspended by another state.

Drivers can get endorsements to a CDL that reflect their ability to drive a special type of vehicle. All bus drivers must have a passenger (P) endorsement, and school bus drivers must also have a school bus (S) endorsement. Getting the P and S endorsements requires additional knowledge and driving tests administered by a certified examiner.

Many states require all bus drivers to be 18 years of age or older and those who drive across state lines to be at least 21 years old.

Federal regulations require interstate bus drivers to pass a physical exam and submit to random testing for drug or alcohol abuse while on duty. Most states impose similar regulations. Bus drivers can have their CDL suspended if they are convicted of a felony involving the use of a motor vehicle or of driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs. Other actions also can result in a suspension after multiple violations. A list of violations is available from the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration.

Most bus drivers are required to undergo background checks before they are hired. 

Advancement

Opportunities for promotion are generally limited, but experienced drivers may become supervisors or dispatchers. Some veteran bus drivers become instructors of new bus drivers.

Important Qualities

Customer-service skills. Bus drivers regularly interact with passengers and must be courteous and helpful.

Hand-eye coordination. Driving a bus requires the controlled use of multiple limbs on the basis of what a person observes. Federal regulations require drivers to have normal use of their arms and legs.

Hearing ability. Bus drivers need good hearing. Federal regulations require the ability to hear a forced whisper in one ear at five feet (with or without the use of a hearing aid).

Patience. Because of possible traffic congestion and sometimes unruly passengers, bus drivers are put in stressful situations and must remain calm and continue to operate their bus.

Physical health. Federal and state regulations do not allow people to become bus drivers if they have a medical condition that may interfere with their operation of a bus, such as high blood pressure or epilepsy. A full list of medical reasons that keep someone from becoming a licensed bus driver is available from the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration.

Visual ability. Bus drivers must be able to pass vision tests. Federal regulations require at least 20/40 vision with a 70-degree field of vision in each eye and the ability to distinguish colors on a traffic light.

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School Bus Monitor jobs

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Top Skills for A School Bus Monitor

SpecialNeedsChildrenClassroomTeachersStudentBehaviorGeneralSupervisionIn-SchoolSuspensionUsediAssistBusAppropriateBehaviorBusSafetyBusRouteSeatBeltsSafeEnvironmentKindergartenDiscussPre-SchoolEnsureSafetyBehaviorManagementSafetyRulesResponsibilitiesmonitorClassroomManagement

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Top School Bus Monitor Skills

  1. Special Needs Children
  2. Classroom Teachers
  3. Student Behavior
You can check out examples of real life uses of top skills on resumes here:
  • Worked with special needs children.
  • Communicate with classroom teachers regarding student progress.
  • Managed student behavior in accordance with Student Code of Conduct and student handbook.
  • Work is performed under the general supervision of Principal
  • Assisted students placed in the in-school suspension program improve their work study skills and class behavior.

Top School Bus Monitor Employers