FIND PERSONALIZED JOBS
Sign up to Zippia and discover your career options with your personalized career search.

Log In

Log In to Save

Sign Up to Save

Sign Up to Dismiss

or

The email and password you specified are invalid. Please, try again.

Email and password are mandatory

Forgot Password?

Don't have an account? Sign Up

reset password

Enter your email address and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Back to Log In

FIND
PERSONALIZED JOBS

Become A Senior Policy Analyst

Where do you want to work?

To get started, tell us where you'd like to work.
Sorry, we can't find that. Please try a different city or state.

Working As A Senior Policy Analyst

  • Communicating with Persons Outside Organization
  • Getting Information
  • Analyzing Data or Information
  • Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge
  • Interpreting the Meaning of Information for Others
  • Mostly Sitting

  • $70,000

    Average Salary

What Does A Senior Policy Analyst Do

Environmental scientists and specialists use their knowledge of the natural sciences to protect the environment and human health. They may clean up polluted areas, advise policymakers, or work with industry to reduce waste.

Duties

Environmental scientists and specialists typically do the following:

  • Determine data collection methods for research projects, investigations, and surveys
  • Collect and compile environmental data from samples of air, soil, water, food, and other materials for scientific analysis
  • Analyze samples, surveys, and other information to identify and assess threats to the environment
  • Develop plans to prevent, control, or fix environmental problems, such as land or water pollution
  • Provide information and guidance to government officials, businesses, and the general public on possible environmental hazards and health risks
  • Prepare technical reports and presentations that explain their research and findings

Environmental scientists and specialists analyze environmental problems and develop solutions. For example, many environmental scientists and specialists work to reclaim lands and waters that have been contaminated by pollution. Others assess the risks that new construction projects pose to the environment and make recommendations to governments and businesses on how to minimize the environmental impact of these projects. Environmental scientists and specialists may do research and provide advice on manufacturing practices, such as advising against the use of chemicals that are known to harm the environment.

The federal government and many state and local governments have regulations to ensure that there is clean air to breathe, safe water to drink, and no hazardous materials in the soil. The regulations also place limits on development, particularly near sensitive ecosystems such as wetlands. Environmental scientists and specialists who work for governments ensure that the regulations are followed. Other environmental scientists and specialists work for consulting firms that help companies comply with regulations and policies.

Some environmental scientists and specialists focus on environmental regulations that are designed to protect people’s health, while others focus on regulations designed to minimize society’s impact on the ecosystem. The following are examples of types of specialists:

Climate change analysts study effects on ecosystems caused by the changing climate. They may do outreach education activities and grant writing typical of scientists.

Environmental health specialists study how environmental factors impact human health. They investigate potential environmental health risks. For example, they may investigate and address issues arising from soil and water contamination caused by nuclear weapons manufacturing. They also educate the public about potential health risks present in the environment.

Environmental restoration planners assess polluted sites and determine the cost and activities necessary to clean up the area.

Industrial ecologists work with industry to increase the efficiency of their operations and thereby limit the impacts these activities have on the environment. They analyze costs and benefits of various programs, as well as their impacts on ecosystems.

Other environmental scientists and specialists perform work and receive training similar to that of other physical or life scientists, but they focus on environmental issues. Environmental chemists are an example.

Environmental chemists study the effects that various chemicals have on ecosystems. For example, they look at how acids affect plants, animals, and people. Some areas in which they work include waste management and the remediation of contaminated soils, water, and air.

Many people with backgrounds in environmental science become postsecondary teachers or high school teachers.

Show More

Show Less

How To Become A Senior Policy Analyst

For most jobs, environmental scientists and specialists need at least a bachelor’s degree in a natural science.

Education

For most entry-level jobs, environmental scientists and specialists must have a bachelor’s degree in environmental science or a science-related field, such as biology, chemistry, physics, geosciences, or engineering. However, a master’s degree may be needed for advancement. Environmental scientists and specialists who have a doctoral degree make up a small percentage of the occupation, and this level of training is typically needed only for the relatively few postsecondary teaching and basic research positions.

A bachelor’s degree in environmental science offers a broad approach to the natural sciences. Students typically take courses in biology, chemistry, geology, and physics. Students often take specialized courses in hydrology or waste management as part of their degree as well. Classes in environmental policy and regulation are also beneficial. Students who want to reach the Ph.D. level and have a career in academia or as an environmental scientist doing basic research may find it advantageous to major in a more specific natural science such as chemistry, biology, physics, or geology, rather than a broader environmental science degree.

Students should look for classes and internships that include work in computer modeling, data analysis, and geographic information systems. Students with experience in these programs will be the best prepared to enter the job market. The University Consortium of Atmospheric Research (UCAR) offers several programs to help students broaden their understanding of environmental sciences.

Important Qualities

Analytical skills. Environmental scientists and specialists base their conclusions on careful analysis of scientific data. They must consider all possible methods and solutions in their analyses.

Communication skills. Environmental scientists and specialists may need to present and explain their findings to audiences of varying backgrounds and to write technical reports.

Interpersonal skills. Environmental scientists and specialists typically work on teams with scientists, engineers, and technicians. Team members must be able to work together effectively to achieve their goals.

Problem-solving skills. Environmental scientists and specialists try to find the best possible solution to problems that affect the environment and people’s health.

Self-discipline. Environmental scientists and specialists may spend a lot of time working alone. They need to be able to stay motivated and get their work done without supervision.

Advancement

Environmental scientists and specialists often begin their careers as field analysts, research assistants, or technicians in laboratories and offices. As they gain experience, they earn more responsibilities and autonomy, and may supervise the work of technicians or other scientists. Eventually, they may be promoted to project leader, program manager, or other management or research position.

Other environmental scientists and specialists go on to work as researchers or faculty at colleges and universities.

Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations

Environmental scientists and specialists can become Certified Hazardous Materials Managers through the Institute of Hazardous Materials Management. This certification, which must be renewed every 5 years, shows that an environmental scientist or specialist is staying current with developments relevant to this occupation’s work.

Work Experience in a Related Occupation

Some environmental scientists and specialists begin their careers as scientists in related occupations, such as hydrology or engineering, and then move into the more interdisciplinary field of environmental science.

Show More

Show Less

Senior Policy Analyst jobs

NO RESULTS

Aw snap, no jobs found.

Add To My Jobs

Senior Policy Analyst Demographics

Gender

Male

52.3%

Female

44.7%

Unknown

3.0%
Ethnicity

White

78.7%

Asian

9.5%

Hispanic or Latino

8.1%

Unknown

2.6%

Black or African American

1.0%
Show More
Languages Spoken

Spanish

35.3%

French

14.7%

Portuguese

8.8%

Italian

5.9%

Bulgarian

2.9%

Bambara

2.9%

Chinese

2.9%

Turkish

2.9%

German

2.9%

Somali

2.9%

Mandarin

2.9%

Persian

2.9%

Hindi

2.9%

Russian

2.9%

Arabic

2.9%

Tamil

2.9%
Show More

Senior Policy Analyst Education

Schools

George Washington University

10.4%

George Mason University

9.6%

American University

8.7%

University of California - Berkeley

6.1%

Florida State University

6.1%

Harvard University

5.2%

University of Pittsburgh -

5.2%

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

5.2%

Georgetown University

4.3%

New York University

4.3%

Syracuse University

3.5%

Boston University

3.5%

Johns Hopkins University

3.5%

Michigan State University

3.5%

Columbia University

3.5%

University of Washington

3.5%

Walden University

3.5%

Auburn University

3.5%

Howard University

3.5%

Carnegie Mellon University

3.5%
Show More
Majors

Law

12.6%

Business

12.3%

Political Science

11.9%

Public Administration

10.9%

Public Policy Analysis

5.6%

Public Health

5.3%

Finance

4.6%

Management

4.0%

Urban Planning

4.0%

History

3.6%

Education

3.3%

Economics

3.3%

Criminal Justice

3.3%

Human Resources Management

3.3%

Environmental Science

2.6%

Communication

2.3%

Natural Resources Management

2.0%

Psychology

1.7%

Health Care Administration

1.7%

Public Relations

1.7%
Show More
Degrees

Masters

45.0%

Bachelors

19.4%

Doctorate

18.9%

Other

11.4%

Certificate

4.0%

Associate

1.3%
Show More
Job type you want
Full Time
Part Time
Internship
Temporary

Real Senior Policy Analyst Salaries

Job Title Company Location Start Date Salary
Senior Analyst, Global Policy and Compliance Interactive Data Real-Time Services, Inc. New York, NY Dec 16, 2015 $93,475
Senior Policy Analyst The Internet Association Washington, DC Nov 21, 2014 $90,376
Senior Recovery Policy Analyst-Risk Operations Citicorp Credit Services, Inc. (USA) Wilmington, DE Dec 22, 2014 $90,000
Senior Analyst, Global Policy and Compliance Interactive Data Pricing & Reference Data Inc. New York, NY Sep 01, 2015 $86,930
Senior Analyst, Global Policy & Compliance Interactive Data Real-Time Services Inc. New York, NY Sep 17, 2014 $86,298
Senior Policy Analyst Migration Policy Institute Washington, DC Jan 08, 2016 $85,000
Senior Policy Analyst Save Darfur Coalition Washington, DC Oct 01, 2010 $82,000
Senior Policy Analyst The Heritage Foundation Washington, DC Oct 17, 2009 $77,200
Senior Policy Analyst The City University of New York New York, NY Aug 16, 2011 $76,689
Senior Policy Analyst International Peace Institute New York, NY Mar 01, 2011 $70,000
Senior Policy Analyst Securing America's Future Energy Washington, DC Sep 16, 2010 $70,000 -
$79,000
Senior Policy Analyst International Peace Institute New York, NY Oct 15, 2012 $68,750
Senior Policy Analyst International Peace Institute New York, NY Oct 15, 2012 $68,000
Senior Policy Analyst American College of Chest Physicians Northbrook, IL Oct 01, 2011 $62,000
Senior Policy Analyst The Brookings Institution Washington, DC Mar 07, 2011 $60,000 -
$75,000
Senior Policy Analyst National Governors Association Washington, DC Oct 05, 2009 $60,000
Senior Policy Analyst National Governors Association Washington, DC Sep 28, 2009 $60,000

No Results

To get more results, try adjusting your search by changing your filters.

Show More

Top Skills for A Senior Policy Analyst

ProceduresEnsureComplianceStrategicPlanHealthCareAdvocacyDODPolicyIssuesPolicyInitiativesPublicSafetyMedicaidEmergencyPolicyAnalysisAdvisoryCommitteeActivityWorkforceDevelopmentPolicyDevelopmentTechnicalAssistanceResourcePublicHealthMentalHealth

Show More

Top Senior Policy Analyst Skills

  1. Procedures
  2. Ensure Compliance
  3. Strategic Plan
You can check out examples of real life uses of top skills on resumes here:
  • Escalated and resolved observed deviations from methodology or procedures.
  • Directed construction disbursement operations locally and nationwide to ensure compliance with company policies and practices.
  • Prepared contracts for consultants on teacher diversity initiatives and participated in departmental budgeting and strategic planning processes.
  • Developed strategies to enhance implementation and evaluation of program, policy and health care delivery intervention.
  • Maintain collaborative relationships with State government officials, State legislators, provider coalitions, advocacy groups, and business organizations.

Top Senior Policy Analyst Employers