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Become A Skin Therapist

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Working As A Skin Therapist

  • Performing for or Working Directly with the Public
  • Assisting and Caring for Others
  • Establishing and Maintaining Interpersonal Relationships
  • Selling or Influencing Others
  • Thinking Creatively
  • Repetitive

  • Make Decisions

  • $77,000

    Average Salary

What Does A Skin Therapist Do

Skincare specialists cleanse and beautify the face and body to enhance a person’s appearance.

Duties

Skincare specialists typically do the following:

  • Evaluate clients’ skin condition and appearance
  • Discuss available treatments and determine which products will improve clients’ skin quality
  • Remove unwanted hair, using wax, laser, or other approved treatments
  • Clean the skin before applying makeup
  • Recommend skin care products, such as cleansers, lotions, or creams 
  • Teach and advise clients on how to apply makeup, and how to take care of their skin
  • Refer clients to another skincare specialist, such as a dermatologist, for serious skin problems
  • Disinfect equipment and clean work areas

Skincare specialists give facials, full-body treatments, and head and neck massages to improve the health and appearance of the skin. Some may provide other skin care treatments, such as peels, masks, and scrubs, to remove dead or dry skin.

In addition to working with clients, skincare specialists create daily skincare routines based on skin analysis and help clients understand which skincare products will work best for them. A growing number of specialists actively sell skincare products, such as cleansers, lotions, and creams.

Those who operate their own salons have managerial duties that include hiring, firing, and supervising workers, as well as keeping business and inventory records, ordering supplies, and arranging for advertising.

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How To Become A Skin Therapist

Skincare specialists must complete a state-approved cosmetology or esthetician program and then pass a state exam for licensure, which all states except Connecticut require.

Education

Skincare specialists usually take a state-approved cosmetology or esthetician program. Although some high schools offer vocational training, most people receive their training from a postsecondary vocational school. The Associated Skin Care Professionals, the largest organization devoted to these workers, offers a State Regulation Guide, which includes the number of prerequisite hours required to complete a cosmetology program.

Training

Newly hired specialists sometimes receive on-the-job training, especially if their jobs require working with chemicals. Those who are employed in a medical environment also may receive on-the-job training, often working alongside an experienced skincare specialist.

Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations

After completing an approved cosmetology or esthetician program, skincare specialists take a written and practical exam to get a state license. Licensing requirements vary by state, so those interested should contact their state board.

The National-Interstate Council of State Boards of Cosmetology provides contact information on state examinations for licensing, with sample exam questions. The Professional Beauty Association and the American Association of Cosmetology Schools also provide information on state examinations, as well as offering other professional links.

Many states offer continuing education seminars and programs designed to keep skincare specialists current on new techniques and products. Post-licensing training is also available through manufacturers, associations, and at trade shows.

Important Qualities

Business skills. Skincare specialists who run their own salon must understand general business principles. For example, they should be skilled at administrative tasks, such as accounting and personnel management, and be able to manage a salon efficiently and profitably.

Customer-service skills. Skincare specialists should be friendly and courteous to their clients. Repeat business is important, particularly for self-employed workers.

Initiative. Self-employed skincare specialists generate their own business opportunities and must be proactive in finding new clients.

Physical stamina. Skincare specialists must be able to spend most of their day standing and massaging clients’ faces and bodies.

Tidiness. Workers must keep a neat personal appearance and keep their work area clean and sanitary. This requirement is necessary for the health and safety of their clients and increases the likelihood that clients will return. 

Time-management skills. Time-management skills are important in scheduling appointments and providing services.

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Top Skills for A Skin Therapist

  1. Skin Care
  2. Facial Treatments
  3. Dermalogica
You can check out examples of real life uses of top skills on resumes here:
  • Retail sales cosmetic applications skin care
  • Provided clients with customized facial treatments, waxing, brow/lash tinting.
  • Perform skin treatments using Dermalogica, body waxing, body treatments, foot treatments, product prescriptions and sales.
  • Exhibited phenomenal customer service skills.
  • Apply chemical peels to reduce fine lines and age spots.

Skin Therapist Demographics

Gender

Female

82.1%

Unknown

11.5%

Male

6.5%
Ethnicity

White

59.1%

Hispanic or Latino

21.8%

Black or African American

10.4%

Asian

5.1%

Unknown

3.5%
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Foreign Languages Spoken

Spanish

50.0%

Swedish

25.0%

Chinese

25.0%

Skin Therapist Education

Schools

Aveda Institute

16.9%

Paul Mitchell-The School

10.2%

Empire Beauty School

10.2%

Regency Beauty Institute

5.1%

Douglas J Aveda Institute

5.1%

The Academy

5.1%

Academy of Cosmetology

3.4%

Douglas J Aveda Institute Chicago

3.4%

Saint Paul's College

3.4%

Solano Community College

3.4%

Remington College

3.4%

Bob Jones University

3.4%

Golden West College

3.4%

Toyota Technological Institute at Chicago

3.4%

North Hills Beauty Academy

3.4%

Laird Institute of Spa Therapy

3.4%

Towson University

3.4%

West Georgia Technical College

3.4%

Career Academy of Beauty

3.4%

Delgado Community College

3.4%
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Majors

Cosmetology

27.6%

Business

10.2%

Physical Therapy

5.5%

Nursing

5.5%

Education

4.7%

Nursing Assistants

3.9%

Medical Assisting Services

3.9%

Elementary Education

3.9%

Liberal Arts

3.9%

Specialized Sales And Merchandising

3.1%

Psychology

3.1%

Chemistry

3.1%

Clinical Psychology

3.1%

Chemical Engineering

3.1%

Communication

3.1%

Management

2.4%

General Sales

2.4%

Early Childhood Education

2.4%

Accounting

2.4%

Pharmacy

2.4%
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Degrees

Other

47.8%

Bachelors

17.4%

License

10.1%

Certificate

10.1%

Associate

6.7%

Masters

4.5%

Diploma

2.8%

Doctorate

0.6%
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