FIND PERSONALIZED JOBS
Sign up to Zippia and discover your career options with your personalized career search.

Log In

Log In to Save

Sign Up to Save

Sign Up to Dismiss

or

The email and password you specified are invalid. Please, try again.

Email and password are mandatory

Forgot Password?

Don't have an account? Sign Up

reset password

Enter your email address and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Back to Log In

FIND
PERSONALIZED JOBS

Become A Solderer

Where do you want to work?

To get started, tell us where you'd like to work.
Sorry, we can't find that. Please try a different city or state.

Working As A Solderer

  • Getting Information
  • Making Decisions and Solving Problems
  • Evaluating Information to Determine Compliance with Standards
  • Handling and Moving Objects
  • Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates
  • Stressful

  • $30,860

    Average Salary

What Does A Solderer Do

Assemblers and fabricators assemble finished products and the parts that go into them. They use tools, machines, and their hands to make engines, computers, aircraft, ships, boats, toys, electronic devices, control panels, and more.

Duties

Assemblers and fabricators typically do the following:

  • Read and understand schematics and blueprints
  • Use hand tools or machines to assemble parts
  • Conduct quality control checks
  • Work closely with designers and engineers in product development

Assemblers and fabricators have an important role in the manufacturing process. They assemble both finished products and the pieces that go into them. The products encompass a full range of manufactured goods, including aircraft, toys, household appliances, automobiles, computers, and electronic devices.

Changes in technology have transformed the manufacturing and assembly process. Modern manufacturing systems use robots, computers, programmable motion-control devices, and various sensing technologies. These technological changes affect the way in which goods are made and the jobs of those who make them. Advanced assemblers must be able to work with these new technologies and use them to manufacture goods.

The job of an assembler or fabricator requires a range of knowledge and skills. Skilled assemblers putting together complex machines, for example, read detailed schematics that show how to assemble the machine. After determining how parts should connect, they use hand or power tools to trim, shim, cut, and make other adjustments to fit components together. Once the parts are properly aligned, they connect them with bolts and screws or weld or solder pieces together.

Quality control is important throughout the assembly process, so assemblers look for faulty components and mistakes in the assembly process. They help fix problems before defective products are made.

Manufacturing techniques are moving away from traditional assembly line systems toward lean manufacturing systems, which use teams of workers to produce entire products or components. Lean manufacturing has changed the nature of the assemblers’ duties.

It has become more common to involve assemblers and fabricators in product development. Designers and engineers consult manufacturing workers during the design stage to improve product reliability and manufacturing efficiency. Some experienced assemblers work with designers and engineers to build prototypes or test products.

Although most assemblers and fabricators are classified as team assemblers, others specialize in producing one type of product or perform the same or similar tasks throughout the assembly process.

The following are examples of types of assemblers and fabricators:

Aircraft structure, surfaces, rigging, and systems assemblers fit, fasten, and install parts of airplanes, space vehicles, or missiles, such as the wings, fuselage, landing gear, rigging and control equipment, and heating and ventilating systems.

Coil winders, tapers, and finishers wind wire coils of electrical components used in a variety of electric and electronic products, including resistors, transformers, generators, and electric motors.

Electrical and electronic equipment assemblers build products such as electric motors, computers, electronic control devices, and sensing equipment. Automated systems have been put in place because many small electronic parts are too small or fragile for human assembly. Much of the remaining work of electrical and electronic assemblers is done by hand during the small-scale production of electronic devices used in all types of aircraft, military systems, and medical equipment. Production by hand requires these workers to use devices such as soldering irons.

Electromechanical equipment assemblers assemble and modify electromechanical devices such as household appliances, computer tomography scanners, or vending machines. The workers use a variety of tools, such as rulers, rivet guns, and soldering irons.

Engine and machine assemblers construct, assemble, and rebuild engines, turbines, and machines used in automobiles, construction and mining equipment, and power generators.

Structural metal fabricators and fitters cut, align, and fit together structural metal parts and may help weld or rivet the parts together.

Fiberglass laminators and fabricators laminate layers of fiberglass on molds to form boat decks and hulls, bodies for golf carts, automobiles, and other products.

Team assemblers work on an assembly line, but they rotate through different tasks, rather than specializing in a single task. The team may decide how the work is assigned and how different tasks are done. Some aspects of lean production, such as rotating tasks and seeking worker input on improving the assembly process, are common to all assembly and fabrication occupations.

Timing device assemblers, adjusters, and calibrators do precision assembling or adjusting of timing devices within very narrow tolerances.

Show More

Show Less

How To Become A Solderer

The education level and qualifications needed to enter these jobs vary depending on the industry and employer. Although a high school diploma is enough for most jobs, experience and additional training is needed for more advanced assembly work.

Education

Most employers require a high school diploma or the equivalent for assembler and fabricator positions.

Training

Workers usually receive on-the-job training, sometimes including employer-sponsored technical instruction.

Some employers may require specialized training or an associate’s degree for the most skilled assembly and fabrication jobs. For example, jobs with electrical, electronic, and aircraft and motor vehicle products manufacturers typically require more formal education through technical schools. Apprenticeship programs are also available.

Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations

The Fabricators & Manufacturers Association, International (FMA) offers the Precision Sheet Metal Operator Certification (PSMO) and the Precision Press Brake Certification (PPB). Although not required, becoming certified can demonstrate competence and professionalism. It also may help a candidate advance in the profession.

In addition, many employers that hire electrical and electronic assembly workers, especially those in the aerospace and defense industries, require certifications in soldering.

Important Qualities

Color vision. Assemblers and fabricators who make electrical and electronic products must be able to distinguish different colors because the wires they work with often are color coded.

Dexterity. Assemblers and fabricators should have a steady hand and good hand-eye coordination, as they must grasp, manipulate, or assemble parts and components that are often very small.

Math skills. Assemblers and fabricators must know basic math and must be able to use computers, as the manufacturing process continues to advance technologically.

Mechanical skills. Modern production systems require assemblers and fabricators to be able to use programmable motion-control devices, computers, and robots on the factory floor.

Physical stamina. Assemblers and fabricators must be able to stand for long periods and perform repetitious work.

Physical strength. Assemblers and fabricators must be strong enough to lift heavy components or pieces of machinery. Some assemblers, such as those in the aerospace industry, must frequently bend or climb ladders when assembling parts.

Technical skills. Assemblers and fabricators must be able to understand technical manuals, blueprints, and schematics for a wide range of products and machines to properly manufacture the final product.

Show More

Show Less

Solderer jobs

NO RESULTS

Aw snap, no jobs found.

Add To My Jobs

Solderer Demographics

Gender

Female

63.3%

Male

35.6%

Unknown

1.1%
Ethnicity

White

80.1%

Hispanic or Latino

10.3%

Asian

7.6%

Unknown

1.4%

Black or African American

0.5%
Show More
Languages Spoken

Spanish

66.7%

Khmer

16.7%

French

16.7%

Solderer Education

Schools

Tri-County Technical College

12.5%

University of Phoenix

8.3%

Mt. Hood Community College

8.3%

ARCLabs

4.2%

ITT Technical Institute-Tampa

4.2%

Greenville Technical College

4.2%

Bryant and Stratton College

4.2%

Moorpark College

4.2%

Baker College

4.2%

State University of New York Broome Community College

4.2%

College of Lake County

4.2%

University of Maryland - University College

4.2%

Front Range Community College

4.2%

State University of New York Buffalo

4.2%

Ross Medical Education Center

4.2%

Del Mar College

4.2%

Macomb Community College

4.2%

Blue Mountain Community College

4.2%

Drexel University

4.2%

Johnson County Community College

4.2%
Show More
Majors

Electrical Engineering

18.6%

Electrical Engineering Technology

11.9%

Psychology

10.2%

Business

10.2%

Medical Assisting Services

5.1%

Health Care Administration

5.1%

Nursing Assistants

3.4%

Precision Metal Working

3.4%

Computer Networking

3.4%

Graphic Design

3.4%

General Studies

3.4%

Automotive Technology

3.4%

Nursing

3.4%

Criminal Justice

3.4%

Accounting

3.4%

Ethnic, Gender And Minority Studies

1.7%

Management

1.7%

Engineering Technology

1.7%

Drafting And Design

1.7%

Medical Technician

1.7%
Show More
Degrees

Other

41.7%

Associate

19.0%

Bachelors

19.0%

Certificate

10.7%

Diploma

8.3%

License

1.2%
Show More
Job type you want
Full Time
Part Time
Internship
Temporary

Real Solderer Salaries

Job Title Company Location Start Date Salary
Solderers and Brazers .07 M & A Welding Company, LLC. Hackberry, LA Oct 26, 2016 $48,627
Solderers and Brazers .07 Welding Works International Hackberry, LA May 07, 2016 $48,627
Solderers and Brazers .07 Welding Works International Ingleside, TX Mar 24, 2016 $44,599
Solderers and Brazers .07 AVC International, LLC Ingleside, TX Jan 28, 2016 $44,599
Solderers and Brazers .07 Cesar's Enterprises, Inc. Ingleside, TX Mar 01, 2016 $44,599
Solderers and Brazers .07 AVC International Workforce LLC Ingleside, TX Jan 01, 2015 $41,427
Solderers and Brazers .07 Welding Works International Ingleside, TX Apr 01, 2015 $41,427
Solderers and Brazers .07 Cesar's Enterprises, Inc. TX Jul 15, 2014 $40,822
Solderer Kiewit Offshore Services, Ltd. TX Apr 01, 2012 $26,275
Solderers and Brazers .07 de-Val Construction Brownsville, TX Jan 28, 2016 $26,046

No Results

To get more results, try adjusting your search by changing your filters.

Show More

Top Skills for A Solderer

CircuitBoardsSurfaceMountComponentsPCBSMTMachinePCBoardsElectronicAssemblyIPCMechanicalAssemblyHandToolsSolderJointsISOFinalInspectionAssemblyLineElectronicComponentsOshaComputerSkillsNecessaryRepairsTorchTipsDataChartsResponsibilitiesi

Show More

Top Solderer Skills

  1. Circuit Boards
  2. Surface Mount Components
  3. PCB
You can check out examples of real life uses of top skills on resumes here:
  • Operated 'Fuchs' brand pick and place machine for oven soldering of circuit boards.
  • Solder, rework and repair of PCB's, Conformal Coating of PCB's.
  • Wire B Solder Inspection PC Boards for electrical test assembling Engineering Department
  • Set and loaded metal pallets individually in pre-production placement of printed circuit boards in electronic assembly.
  • Certified on IPC-A-610 and IPC-J-STD-001.

Top Solderer Employers

Show More