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Become A Spanish Interpreter

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Working As A Spanish Interpreter

  • Interpreting the Meaning of Information for Others
  • Getting Information
  • Performing for or Working Directly with the Public
  • Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge
  • Communicating with Persons Outside Organization
  • Deal with People

  • $44,190

    Average Salary

What Does A Spanish Interpreter Do At Johns Hopkins Medicine

* Provide Spanish/English Interpretation for Spanish speaking patients.
* Part Time (20 hours)
* Evenings
* pm
* pm
* Diploma/Certificate/GED required
* One year of previous experience performing written and oral translation for a non
* English speaking population.
* Knowledge of medical terminology preferred.
* Successful completion of Cyracom language competency assessment.
* Works in patient care areas where there are no physical discomforts due to dust, dirt, temperature and the like
* Johns Hopkins Health System and its affiliates are drug-free workplace employers.
* Johns Hopkins Health System and its affiliates are an Equal Opportunity / Affirmative Action employers.
* All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, age, national origin, mental or physical disability, genetic information, veteran status, or any other status protected by federal, state, or local

What Does A Spanish Interpreter Do At University of Rochester

* The On
* Call/TAR Spanish Language Interpreter provides interpreting services for all clinical and professional University of Rochester Medical Center staff, patients and family members/significant others who are with the patient.
* All On
* Call staff must offer at least 14 hours per month to the Lead for Spanish Interpreters for overnight on-call coverage.
* When the minimum On
* Call requirement is met, scheduled work may be taken as per hospital needs and at the discretion of the Interpreter and the department Lead Scheduler.
* There is no requirement for the On
* Call interpreter to work a minimum number of scheduled hours.
* Specific Responsibilities:
* Completes scheduled training and other required staff activities.
* Yearly mandatory online policy and procedure training
* Yearly health updates
* Attends TAR/On
* Call staff meetings
* Other training/activities as necessary
* Completes all paperwork and administrative duties.
* eRecords completed at the end of each patient interaction
* On
* Call Interpreter log book
* Monthly On
* Call preference calendar
* Yearly certification updates (if applicable)
* Professional development transcript
* Other paperwork as necessary
* Performs clinical duties.
* During On
* Call shifts, interpreter carries a pager assigned by the hospital responding to all pages immediately.
* Interpreter interprets all assignments, whether prescheduled or On
* Call, in a timely and professional manner in accordance with hospital policy

What Does A Spanish Interpreter Do At Transperfect

* Performing accurate and complete over-the-phone consecutive English
* Spanish interpreting
* Adhering to ethical and professional best practices
* Adhering to industry and corporate confidentiality guidelines
* Using technology, language tools and job aids effectively Requirements
* Available to work a minimum of 35 hours per week
* OPM Background and/or Security Investigation required
* Ability to work scheduled shift from home and commute to on-site training in Tucson

What Does A Spanish Interpreter Do At Confidential

* i.e. when not interpreting, you may be required to translate or transcribe source materials/documents and/or perform quality control functions on documents/materials completed by other linguists.
* Perform as required, administrative duties related to tasks.
* Such duties may include, but are not limited to, placing log sheets, line sheets, duplicating tapes and/or summaries into binders, coping and stapling related

What Does A Spanish Interpreter Do At Johns Hopkins Medicine

* Provides interpreter service of the Hispanic population in all patient areas.
* PRN (as needed)
* Rotating Shift
* Some weekend work
* Diploma/Certificate/GED required
* One year of previous experience performing written and oral translation for a non
* English speaking population. ; Knowledge of medical terminology preferred.
* Successful completion of Cyracom language competency assessment.
* Works in patient care areas where there are no physical discomforts due to dust, dirt, temperature and the like
* Johns Hopkins Health System and its affiliates are Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action employers.
* All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity,sex, age, national origin, disability, protected veteran status, and or any other status protected by federal, state, or local

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How To Become A Spanish Interpreter

Although interpreters and translators typically need at least a bachelor’s degree, the most important requirement is that they be fluent in at least two languages (English and at least one other language). Many complete job-specific training programs. It is not necessary for interpreters and translators to have been raised in two languages to succeed in these jobs, but many grew up communicating in the languages in which they use for work.

Education

The educational backgrounds of interpreters and translators vary widely, but it is essential that they be fluent in English and at least one other language.

High school students interested in becoming an interpreter or translator should take a broad range of courses that focus on English writing and comprehension, foreign languages, and computer proficiency. Other helpful pursuits for prospects include spending time in a foreign country, engaging in direct contact with foreign cultures, and reading extensively on a variety of subjects in English and at least one other language. Through community organizations, students interested in sign language interpreting may take introductory classes in American Sign Language (ASL) and seek out volunteer opportunities to work with people who are deaf or hard of hearing.

Beyond high school, people interested in becoming interpreters or translators have numerous educational options. Although many jobs require a bachelor’s degree, majoring in a language is not always necessary. Rather, an educational background in a particular field of study can provide a natural area of subject-matter expertise.

Training

Interpreters and translators generally need specialized training on how to do their work. Formal programs in interpreting and translating are available at colleges and universities nationwide and through nonuniversity training programs, conferences, and courses.

Many people who work as interpreters or translators in more technical areas—such as software localization, engineering, or finance—have a master’s degree. Those working in the community as court or medical interpreters or translators are more likely to complete job-specific training programs or certificates.

Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations

There is currently no universal certification required of interpreters and translators beyond passing the required court interpreting exams offered by most states. However, workers can take a variety of tests that show proficiency. For example, the American Translators Association provides certification in 27 language combinations involving English.

Federal courts provide judiciary certification for Spanish, Navajo, and Haitian Creole interpreters, and many states offer their own certifications or licenses for these languages.

The National Association of the Deaf and the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf jointly offer certification for general sign language interpreters. In addition, the registry offers specialty tests in legal interpreting, speech reading, and deaf-to-deaf interpreting—which includes interpreting among deaf speakers of different native languages and from ASL to tactile signing.

The U.S. Department of State has a three-test series for prospective interpreters—one test in simple consecutive interpreting (for escort work), another in simultaneous interpreting (for court work), and a third in conference-level interpreting (for international conferences)—as well as a test for prospective translators. These tests are not considered a credential, but their completion indicates that a person has significant skill in the occupation.

The International Association of Conference Interpreters offers information for conference interpreters.

The Certification Commission for Healthcare Interpreters offers two types of certifications for healthcare interpreters: Associate Healthcare Interpreter, for interpreters of languages other than Spanish, Arabic, and Mandarin; and Certified Healthcare Interpreter, for interpreters of Spanish, Arabic, and Mandarin.

The National Board of Certification for Medical Interpreters offers certification for medical interpreters of Spanish.

Other Experience

A good way for translators to learn firsthand about the occupation is to start working in-house for a translation company. Doing informal or volunteer work is an excellent way for people seeking interpreter or translator jobs to gain experience.

Volunteer opportunities for interpreters are available through community organizations, hospitals, and sporting events, such as marathons, that involve international competitors.

Paid or unpaid internships are other ways that interpreters and translators can gain experience. Escort interpreting may offer an opportunity for inexperienced candidates to work alongside a more experienced interpreter. Interpreters also may find it easier to begin working in industries with particularly high demand for language services, such as court or medical interpreting.

Whatever path of entry new interpreters and translators pursue, they should develop mentoring relationships with experienced workers in the field to build their skills and confidence and to establish and expand a network of contacts. Mentoring may be formal, such as that received through a professional association, or informal, such as that engaged in with a coworker or an acquaintance who has experience as an interpreter or translator. Both the American Translators Association and the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf offer formal mentoring programs.

Advancement

After interpreters and translators have enough experience, they can move up to more difficult assignments, seek certification, and obtain editorial responsibility. They can also manage or start their own business.

Many self-employed interpreters and translators start their own business by first establishing themselves in their field. They may submit resumes and samples to different translation and interpreting companies and work for companies that match their skills with a job. Many then get work on the basis of their reputation or through referrals from existing clients.

Important Qualities

Business skills. Self-employed and freelance interpreters and translators need general business skills to manage their finances and careers successfully. They must set prices for their work, bill customers, keep records, and market their services in order to build their client base.

Concentration. Interpreters and translators must have the ability to concentrate while others are speaking or moving around them.

Cultural sensitivity. Interpreters and translators must be sensitive to cultural differences and expectations among the people whom they are helping to communicate. Successful interpreting and translating is a matter not only of knowing the words in different languages but also of understanding people’s cultures.

Dexterity. Sign language interpreters must be able to make quick and coordinated hand, finger, and arm movements when interpreting.

Interpersonal skills. Interpreters and translators, particularly those who are self-employed, must be able to get along with those who hire or use their services in order to retain clients and attract new business.

Listening skills. Interpreters must listen carefully when interpreting for audiences to ensure that they hear and interpret correctly.

Reading skills. Translators must be able to read in all of the languages in which they are working.

Speaking skills. Interpreters and translators must speak clearly in all of the languages in which they are working.

Writing skills. Translators must be able to write clearly and effectively in all of the languages in which they are working.

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Spanish Interpreter jobs

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Real Spanish Interpreter Salaries

Job Title Company Location Start Date Salary
Spanish Interpreter/Liaison Dentistry VCU Richmond, VA Oct 01, 2013 $50,877
Spanish Interpreter/Liaison VCU Dental Faculty Practice Association Richmond, VA Oct 01, 2010 $41,300
Spanish Interpreter Accipio Language Services Lexington, KY Aug 15, 2013 $40,697
Spanish Interpreter/Liaison VCU Dental Faculty Practice Association Richmond, VA Oct 01, 2010 $37,500

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Top Skills for A Spanish Interpreter

SpanishSpeakingPatientsHospitalStaffCustomerServiceSimultaneousInterpretationFinancialInstitutionsHealthcareProvidersClinicsEnglish/SpanishInterpretationServicesEmergencyCallsSocialServicesPhoneCallsLegalDocumentsInsuranceCompaniesMedicalAppointmentsViceVersaMedicalTerminologyEthicalCodesMedicalStaffGovernmentAgencies

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Top Spanish Interpreter Skills

  1. Spanish Speaking Patients
  2. Hospital Staff
  3. Customer Service
You can check out examples of real life uses of top skills on resumes here:
  • Facilitate understanding between clinic staff and Spanish speaking patients.
  • Interpret for hospital staff and patients of mental and physical health clinics, document appointments, billing, attend meetings.
  • Documented, investigated and filed their verbal requests regarding medical treatment or customer service.
  • Provide simultaneous interpretation between lawyers and their clients in English and Spanish for cases involving Family law and child custodial issues.
  • Worked closely with financial institutions such as Chase, BB&T, FIS Global and other major institutions.

Top Spanish Interpreter Employers

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Spanish Interpreter Videos

How to Become a Spanish Interpreter

A Day in the Life of an Interpreter

A Day in The Life: Interpreters

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