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Become A Street Cleaner

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Working As A Street Cleaner

  • Performing General Physical Activities
  • Handling and Moving Objects
  • Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Material
  • Getting Information
  • Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates
  • Outdoors/walking/standing

  • $18,783

    Average Salary

Example Of What A Street Cleaner does

  • Clean gutters dump trash out of trash cans.
  • Cleaned building floors by sweeping, mopping, scrubbing, or vacuuming.
  • Operated back hoe, Street Sweeper, Dump Truck, and Skid Steer Labor
  • Shoveled refuse into movable container that was pushed from place to place.
  • Maintain cleanliness of public facilities, keep gutters clear to prevent sidewalk flooding.
  • Operated street sweeper and other machinery to clean sidewalks, curbs, and roadways.
  • Picked up trash Cut grass Emptied trash barrel Wacked weeds in various areas Swept the street Replaced trash bag
  • Picked up paper and similar rubbish from lawns, flower beds, and highway median strips, using spike-tipped stick.
  • Summer job for the City of Brockton * cleaned the city streets.
  • Excelled customer service skills and great ability to understand customers' needs.
  • Clean and clear debris from culverts, catch basins, drop inlets, ditches, and other drain structures.
  • Emptied trash bins and trained new and incoming W.E.P workers accordingly.

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How To Become A Street Cleaner

Most janitors and building cleaners learn on the job. Formal education is not required.

Education

Janitors and building cleaners do not need any formal educational credential. However, high school courses in shop can be helpful for jobs involving repair work.

Training

Most janitors and building cleaners learn on the job. Beginners typically work with a more experienced janitor, learning how to use and maintain equipment such as vacuums, floor buffers, and other tools. On the job, they also learn how to repair minor electrical and plumbing problems.

Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations

Although not required, certification is available through the Building Service Contractors Association International, the International Executive Housekeepers Association, and ISSA—The International Sanitary Supply Association. Certification can demonstrate competence and may make applicants more appealing to employers.

Important Qualities

Interpersonal skills. Janitors and building cleaners should get along well with their supervisors, other cleaners, and the people who live or work in the buildings they clean.

Mechanical skills. Janitors and building cleaners should understand general building operations. They should be able to make routine repairs, such as repairing leaky faucets. 

Physical stamina. Janitors and building cleaners spend most of their workday on their feet, operating cleaning equipment and lifting and moving supplies or tools. As a result, they should have good physical stamina.

Physical strength. Janitors and building cleaners often must lift and move cleaning materials and heavy equipment. Cases of liquid cleaner and trash receptacles, for example, can be very heavy, so workers should be strong enough to lift them without injuring their back.

Time-management skills. Janitors and building cleaners should be able to plan and complete tasks in a timely manner.

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Street Cleaner jobs

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Street Cleaner Typical Career Paths

Street Cleaner Demographics

Gender

  • Male

    74.4%
  • Female

    23.3%
  • Unknown

    2.2%

Ethnicity

  • White

    74.6%
  • Hispanic or Latino

    17.2%
  • Asian

    6.6%
  • Unknown

    1.3%
  • Black or African American

    0.4%
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Languages Spoken

  • Spanish

    100.0%

Street Cleaner

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Street Cleaner Education

Street Cleaner

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Top Skills for A Street Cleaner

MunicipalStreetsFlowerBedsSimilarRubbishCleanStreets-WorkHighwayMedianStripsMovableContainerTrashCansShovelsRefuseTrashBinsDropInletsCatchBasinsClearDebrisActivateRotaryBrushesCityStreetsDeadEndStreetsWEPDumpTruckCustomerServiceSkillsCleanSidewalksDirtTrap

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Top Street Cleaner Skills

  1. Municipal Streets
  2. Flower Beds
  3. Similar Rubbish
You can check out examples of real life uses of top skills on resumes here:
  • Picked up paper and similar rubbish from lawns, flower beds, and highway median strips, using spike-tipped stick.
  • Sweep refuse from municipal streets, gutters, and sidewalks into piles and shoveled refuse into movable containers.
  • Clean gutters dump trash out of trash cans.
  • Gathered and disposed of trash and recycling and lined trash bins with bags.
  • Clean and clear debris from culverts, catch basins, drop inlets, ditches, and other drain structures.

Top Street Cleaner Employers

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